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#31 Wilfrid

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 07:24 PM

Time Out has a coffee issue this week. We've been talking on other threads about the spread of jargon, and you'll find example after example of marketing through discourse in these pages. I mean, coffee may be getting better, but it's still coffee. We've just found great new ways of talking about it.

Techniques, for example:

In this straightforward practice, hot water is flowed over coffee grinds—creating a pure, delicate extract that brings the bean’s flavor profile into clear focus. Although it sounds easy, getting this right requires some skill: A barista moistens the grinds so that they release their gases (this is called 'blooming'), before covering them with a slow and steady stream of water, poured in concentric circles.


link

I mean, where to start? This is a description of ...but:

* This is "practice," right? Like yoga practice. It's not just pouring hot water over grounds to make a cup of coffee.

* "Flow" is used, possibly for the first time, as a transitive verb.

* "...sounds easy". Yes. Yes, it does.

* "moistens the grinds so that they release their gases". I can confirm that. If you pour hot water on coffee grounds, you get this smell of coffee. Works every time.

* "poured in concentric circles". I don't even believe that. I admit, that sounds difficult. I wonder if you start with a large circle and get smaller, or vice versa.

Pfui.

#32 StephanieL

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 08:39 PM

I'm so glad tea is still largely ignored, thus being spared this level of preciousness/pretentiousness.

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#33 Behemoth

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 08:49 PM

Along with skiing and schnapps, good attitude-free espresso is one of the main reasons I love living in Munich.
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#34 SLBunge

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 09:02 PM

* "Flow" is used, possibly for the first time, as a transitive verb.

I wish this really was the first time for this usage of "flow". I hear "flow" as a transitive verb almost as often as I hear "architect" used as a transitive verb. Bah.
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#35 cstuart

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 09:08 PM

I'm so glad tea is still largely ignored, thus being spared this level of preciousness/pretentiousness.

I take it you've never been to a Lupicia or other "high end" tea shop?

#36 cstuart

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 09:12 PM

Time Out has a coffee issue this week. We've been talking on other threads about the spread of jargon, and you'll find example after example of marketing through discourse in these pages. I mean, coffee may be getting better, but it's still coffee. We've just found great new ways of talking about it.

Techniques, for example:

In this straightforward practice, hot water is flowed over coffee grinds—creating a pure, delicate extract that brings the bean's flavor profile into clear focus. Although it sounds easy, getting this right requires some skill: A barista moistens the grinds so that they release their gases (this is called 'blooming'), before covering them with a slow and steady stream of water, poured in concentric circles.


link

I mean, where to start? This is a description of ...but:

* This is "practice," right? Like yoga practice. It's not just pouring hot water over grounds to make a cup of coffee.

* "Flow" is used, possibly for the first time, as a transitive verb.

* "...sounds easy". Yes. Yes, it does.

* "moistens the grinds so that they release their gases". I can confirm that. If you pour hot water on coffee grounds, you get this smell of coffee. Works every time.

* "poured in concentric circles". I don't even believe that. I admit, that sounds difficult. I wonder if you start with a large circle and get smaller, or vice versa.

Pfui.

This really comes from the Japanese, down to the concentric circles (you start in the middle). There was actually a guy on egullet a few years ago who would post videos from some coffee scientist (or something) in Japan demonstrating this, or a very similar, technique.

#37 Stone

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 09:15 PM

Risotto has to be stirred counterclockwise. Unless you're south of the equator.

#38 alice

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 09:17 PM


Time Out has a coffee issue this week. We've been talking on other threads about the spread of jargon, and you'll find example after example of marketing through discourse in these pages. I mean, coffee may be getting better, but it's still coffee. We've just found great new ways of talking about it.

Techniques, for example:

In this straightforward practice, hot water is flowed over coffee grinds—creating a pure, delicate extract that brings the bean's flavor profile into clear focus. Although it sounds easy, getting this right requires some skill: A barista moistens the grinds so that they release their gases (this is called 'blooming'), before covering them with a slow and steady stream of water, poured in concentric circles.


link

I mean, where to start? This is a description of ...but:

* This is "practice," right? Like yoga practice. It's not just pouring hot water over grounds to make a cup of coffee.

* "Flow" is used, possibly for the first time, as a transitive verb.

* "...sounds easy". Yes. Yes, it does.

* "moistens the grinds so that they release their gases". I can confirm that. If you pour hot water on coffee grounds, you get this smell of coffee. Works every time.

* "poured in concentric circles". I don't even believe that. I admit, that sounds difficult. I wonder if you start with a large circle and get smaller, or vice versa.

Pfui.

This really comes from the Japanese, down to the concentric circles (you start in the middle). There was actually a guy on egullet a few years ago who would post videos from some coffee scientist (or something) in Japan demonstrating this, or a very similar, technique.


I took a video of the Chemex technique at EMP a little while back. It was pretty dramatic with the whole tableside show, and there were lots of curious onlookers at other tables haha.

#39 Wilfrid

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 09:20 PM

This really comes from the Japanese, down to the concentric circles (you start in the middle). There was actually a guy on egullet a few years ago who would post videos from some coffee scientist (or something) in Japan demonstrating this, or a very similar, technique.


I have a dollar says making coffee by pouring hot water over the grounds is a pretty old and pretty general method. Without all the frills, I mean.

#40 alice

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 09:23 PM

I'm so glad tea is still largely ignored, thus being spared this level of preciousness/pretentiousness.

I wonder if it's just a matter of time before there is some third wave tea movement in NY. Ruth Reichl just wrote something about annoying "high-fallutin'" tea terms like "monkey-picked" and "large leafed."

#41 prasantrin

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 09:25 PM

I took a video of the Chemex technique at EMP a little while back. It was pretty dramatic with the whole tableside show, and there were lots of curious onlookers at other tables haha.


Using a Chemex is like using those plastic Melita drip cones. Not really much to it, so I don't really understand the attraction of it (although I spent 11 years in Japan, and pretty much everyone there makes coffee that way, so I'm used to it).

I want to eat dinner with the guy in the background. I like the way he tears little bits from his roll but schmears what appears to be a ton o' butter on them. He's my kind of bread-eater!

#42 g.johnson

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 09:33 PM


This really comes from the Japanese, down to the concentric circles (you start in the middle). There was actually a guy on egullet a few years ago who would post videos from some coffee scientist (or something) in Japan demonstrating this, or a very similar, technique.


I have a dollar says making coffee by pouring hot water over the grounds is a pretty old and pretty general method. Without all the frills, I mean.

Shoving the beans up your bum having been found to be socially awkward and much less refreshing.
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#43 Orik

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 09:44 PM

Unless you're a Jacu bird.

You'd think pouring water over coffee was an age old method, but you need to recall that the common method in the US was to pour dirty water over coffee and then burn and oxidize the result for several hours.
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#44 Wilfrid

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 09:52 PM

You'd think pouring water over coffee was an age old method, but you need to recall that the common method in the US was to pour dirty water over coffee and then burn and oxidize the result for several hours.


We're really talking about the sixteenth century.

#45 cstuart

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Posted 13 December 2010 - 10:17 PM


This really comes from the Japanese, down to the concentric circles (you start in the middle). There was actually a guy on egullet a few years ago who would post videos from some coffee scientist (or something) in Japan demonstrating this, or a very similar, technique.


I have a dollar says making coffee by pouring hot water over the grounds is a pretty old and pretty general method. Without all the frills, I mean.

I'm of course talking about the frills.