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The 2012 Growing Season


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#31 Daniel

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 04:15 PM

leaving for l.a tomorrow. alas, because of global warming a large number of big heirlooms (purple cherokee, paul robeson, italian heirloom) look poised to be ripe for the picking a few days after that. i am seriously considering picking them before leaving for the airport tomorrow and taking them with me. they're almost ready and can finish ripening off the vine. what's the tsa's position on large tomatoes in carry-on baggage?


You should be good. Just don't can them or jar them.
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#32 memesuze

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 04:40 PM

Our squash plants look pretty bad. Practically overnight the stalks and the leaves went from looking good to completely droopy. I've been trying hard to keep them watered without overwatering. Unfortunately, I'm just the substitute gardener while N is away so I don't really know what I'm doing.

It's been a while since I grew squash, but this sounds like squash vine borer to me. GG?
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#33 SLBunge

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 04:46 PM


leaving for l.a tomorrow. alas, because of global warming a large number of big heirlooms (purple cherokee, paul robeson, italian heirloom) look poised to be ripe for the picking a few days after that. i am seriously considering picking them before leaving for the airport tomorrow and taking them with me. they're almost ready and can finish ripening off the vine. what's the tsa's position on large tomatoes in carry-on baggage?


You should be good. Just don't can them or jar them.

Yep.
Suffocating under a pile of cheese curds.

#34 GG Mora

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 08:45 PM


Our squash plants look pretty bad. Practically overnight the stalks and the leaves went from looking good to completely droopy. I've been trying hard to keep them watered without overwatering. Unfortunately, I'm just the substitute gardener while N is away so I don't really know what I'm doing.

It's been a while since I grew squash, but this sounds like squash vine borer to me. GG?

Hard to say. I've not yet had to deal with squash vine borer, but it seems to me they'd take down one stretch of vine at a time, not all the plants overnight. More likely drought stress or some kind of virus (which can be insect-borne, most likely by cucumber beetles). I have to say that, in 25 years of vegetable gardening here in Vermont, I've seen a dumbfounding uptick in the number and variety of insect pests in the last 5 or 6 years. I think a lot of that has to do with the milder winters. When the ground freezes solid 4 feet deep for 4 or 5 months, there's not much that can survive in it. That doesn't happen much any more, so eggs for all kinds of plant-eating bastards hang out all cozy in the dirt and then hatch just in time to fuck up the garden.

#35 StephanieL

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 11:43 PM



Our squash plants look pretty bad. Practically overnight the stalks and the leaves went from looking good to completely droopy. I've been trying hard to keep them watered without overwatering. Unfortunately, I'm just the substitute gardener while N is away so I don't really know what I'm doing.

It's been a while since I grew squash, but this sounds like squash vine borer to me. GG?

Hard to say. I've not yet had to deal with squash vine borer, but it seems to me they'd take down one stretch of vine at a time, not all the plants overnight. More likely drought stress or some kind of virus (which can be insect-borne, most likely by cucumber beetles). I have to say that, in 25 years of vegetable gardening here in Vermont, I've seen a dumbfounding uptick in the number and variety of insect pests in the last 5 or 6 years. I think a lot of that has to do with the milder winters. When the ground freezes solid 4 feet deep for 4 or 5 months, there's not much that can survive in it. That doesn't happen much any more, so eggs for all kinds of plant-eating bastards hang out all cozy in the dirt and then hatch just in time to fuck up the garden.

Considering the high temperatures and general lack of rain over the last couple of weeks here, I'm putting my money on drought stress. No one else has squash plants so I can't tell if it's an insect or virus problem.

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#36 mongo_jones

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 12:11 AM

leaving for l.a tomorrow. alas, because of global warming a large number of big heirlooms (purple cherokee, paul robeson, italian heirloom) look poised to be ripe for the picking a few days after that. i am seriously considering picking them before leaving for the airport tomorrow and taking them with me. they're almost ready and can finish ripening off the vine. what's the tsa's position on large tomatoes in carry-on baggage?


actually, they're ready to eat now. but i'm taking them with me to l.a anyway!

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#37 GG Mora

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 02:27 PM


leaving for l.a tomorrow. alas, because of global warming a large number of big heirlooms (purple cherokee, paul robeson, italian heirloom) look poised to be ripe for the picking a few days after that. i am seriously considering picking them before leaving for the airport tomorrow and taking them with me. they're almost ready and can finish ripening off the vine. what's the tsa's position on large tomatoes in carry-on baggage?


actually, they're ready to eat now. but i'm taking them with me to l.a anyway!

Posted Image

What are those beautiful little flamey-stripey ones?

#38 Daniel

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 02:36 PM

Those are some nice ta-may-tas, Mongo.
Ason, I keep planets in orbit.

#39 mongo_jones

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 04:14 AM

The pretty stripey ones are red zebras.

They made it safely to l.a. We ate one of the large Italian heirlooms and the Paul Robeson at dinner tonight. The Robeson was indistinguishable from any black krim I've ever eaten--meaning good--and the Italian heirloom is nothing special, but not bad.

Apologies for the proper sentence case in this post. iPhone's don't understand.

my annoying opinions: whisky, food and occasional cultural commentary

 

current restaurant review: house of curry (sri lankan in rosemount, mn)

 

current whisky review: glen ord 28

 

current recipe: white bean curry with green peppers

 

 

facts are meaningless. you could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true!
~homer simpson


 


#40 StephanieL

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 03:25 PM

I pulled out all of the dead squash plants yesterday. It looks like some new ones are coming up, though, and our Jerusalem artichoke plant is thriving.

"Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." --John Steinbeck

 

"Insanity runs in my family.  It practically gallops."--Arsenic and Old Lace

 


#41 GG Mora

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 03:21 PM

I pulled out all of the dead squash plants yesterday. It looks like some new ones are coming up, though, and our Jerusalem artichoke plant is thriving.

If they all wilted and died, it was probably a bacteria or virus.

#42 Abbylovi

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 04:38 PM

Is there anything you can do to combat that or nurse the plant back to health?
It is better to have beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.

#43 StephanieL

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Posted 21 July 2012 - 05:43 PM

Is there anything you can do to combat that or nurse the plant back to health?

I don't know. I'd written N to ask what I should do and she said to pull them out if things got worse. They were completely shriveled up by the end.

"Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." --John Steinbeck

 

"Insanity runs in my family.  It practically gallops."--Arsenic and Old Lace

 


#44 GG Mora

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Posted 31 July 2012 - 01:13 PM

Successes in spite of an overwhelming bug population.

#45 Abbylovi

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Posted 31 July 2012 - 03:25 PM

Incredibly impressive GG.

So my cherry tomato plant is huge (around 6 ft) and producing like crazy but some of the branches and leaves have gone brown. My brandywine is also huge, around the same size and producing greenery like crazy but so far only 3 (large) fruit have set. I haven't fertilized in about a month, could that be it?
It is better to have beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.