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#16 Vanessa

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Posted 26 January 2005 - 11:14 PM

You could say that. It may be that next time I get a lamb like this (and I will) I shall cook the leg on the bone and/or the rolled shoulder in one piece. That's just not what I wanted to be doing with them this time. Cooking large pieces of meat is rather the exception for me and has the greater potential for waste.

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#17 g.johnson

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Posted 26 January 2005 - 11:18 PM

You could say that. It may be that next time I get a lamb like this (and I will) I shall cook the leg on the bone and/or the rolled shoulder in one piece. That's just not what I wanted to be doing with them this time. Cooking large pieces of meat is rather the exception for me and has the greater potential for waste.

v

HF-W's slow cooked shoulder can be successfully reheated. And his shepherd's pie uses left over rare roast lamb and is delicious.
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#18 winesonoma

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Posted 26 January 2005 - 11:36 PM

At the market today Lamb Shanks $6.99 a pound! I shall have to start hunting on my own. :lol:
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#19 Vanessa

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Posted 26 January 2005 - 11:57 PM

You could say that.  It may be that next time I get a lamb like this (and I will) I shall cook the leg on the bone and/or the rolled shoulder in one piece.  That's just not what I wanted to be doing with them this time.  Cooking large pieces of meat is rather the exception for me and has the greater potential for waste.

v

HF-W's slow cooked shoulder can be successfully reheated. And his shepherd's pie uses left over rare roast lamb and is delicious.

I'm not denying all that. But I also don't see why dishes made from minced lamb should be made from inferior lamb. Or that something made from a whole joint is necessarily superior or less wasteful of a good piece of meat than dividing it up and making different use of it.

Although due to negative childhood experiences I'll probably be 80 years old before I go within a million miles of a shepherd's pie of any kind.

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#20 Vanessa

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Posted 28 January 2005 - 11:31 PM

The first portion of minced lamb shoulder became Iraqi Uruq. I was none the wiser than anyone until the dish was cooked and eaten. These are meat patties made with a small amount of wholewheat yeasted batter mixed into the minced meat with chopped onion, ground cumin, s&p and egg and left to ferment further. Then dollops dropped into a frying pan and fried until browned both sides.

This creates a very light, tender patty. Most interesting.

Iraqi recipes coming from Nina Jamil-Garbutt's Baghdad Kitchen, published in the UK in 1985.

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#21 helena

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Posted 28 January 2005 - 11:52 PM

Really sounds interesting - how was the flavor though? Not sour at all?
"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#22 Vanessa

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Posted 29 January 2005 - 09:12 AM

When I said ferment I meant like bread dough is left to rise, so no chance of sourness. And no real sense of the presence of dough in there apart from a few crispy edges - it was only roughly a rounded tablespoon of wholewheat flour, 1/4 teaspoon of yeast vs. 6oz of lamb so the dough proportion is small but has this strange effect of lightening the mix. First the flour/yeast/water is left for an hour or so to rise, which it didn't as too liquid and I was worried it wasn't working, then mixed with the meat etc and left about a couple of hours and this time there was a real effect - the whole mixture changed consistency and I realised it had worked perfectly.

The patties cook quite flat due to the loose mix.

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#23 Rail Paul

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Posted 29 January 2005 - 07:28 PM

The NY Daily News has a recipe for lamb in this week's editions. It looks fairly complicated, with panko, beets, etc, but seems like it could be done quickly if you advance prepare the roasted beets of the couscous. Bordelaise, couscous, and panko.

Macadamia-Crusted Australian
Lamb Chops with Bordelaise Sauce
Serves 4
The Sunburnt Cow, 137 Avenue C, (212) 529-0005


Lamb Recipe
Dreams come in all sizes, shapes, and colors.

#24 Vanessa

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Posted 29 January 2005 - 10:22 PM

Some of the flank/rib part is cut in pieces and marinating in salt, paprika, vinegar, chopped onion & garlic, bay, clove, thyme overnight for Ensopada de Carneiro, a Portuguese lamb stew from an astounding 1200-page tome on Portuguese cooking: O Livro de Pantagruel, of which I have the 55th edition from 1997. (Oh sorry, I forgot that only French cuisine has been codified :lol: ) Carneiro is in fact mutton rather than lamb (borrego).

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#25 Vanessa

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 10:01 PM

Ensopada bubbling quietly away: pieces of lamb breast taken out of marinade; browned in mixture of lard, butter and olive oil; smattering of flour blended in; marinade added back along with stock, sliced carrot, sliced potatoes, salt.

Lamb bones plus the usual suspects are becoming a stock at the back of the stove.

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#26 helena

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 10:05 PM

Got some lamb but can't find any definite information about this particular cut. It's called london broil or top round.
The only recipe is in Valenti's book and calls for marinating in yogurt overnight and then grilling.
There are couple of recipes for lamb rump can they be used? Although the rump looks different - grained across where the top grain is along like a flank.
"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#27 omnivorette

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 10:45 PM

Got some lamb but can't find any definite information about this particular cut. It's called london broil or top round.
The only recipe is in Valenti's book and calls for marinating in yogurt overnight and then grilling.
There are couple of recipes for lamb rump can they be used? Although the rump looks different - grained across where the top grain is along like a flank.

This may be my ignorance, but I have never heard of lamb referred to as london broil or top round. Only beef... ?
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#28 omnivorette

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 10:48 PM

I just came across this:

http://www.tvsp.org/retail-cuts.html
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#29 helena

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 10:48 PM

No you're completely right - at least none of the reference books i have mention this as a lamb cut but this is what the label says, and it looks like a london broil/round :lol:
"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#30 omnivorette

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 11:07 PM

Maybe it's mislabeled? I have an idea. Cut off a corner and pan-fry it and see if it tastes like beef or lamb (or smells like it). You have me curious now.

Maybe it's a lamb steak? Eyebrows loves them. I just do them in a cast iron griddle pan...
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid