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#31 helena

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 11:19 PM

i just called the store - the butcher told me it's the same cut as the one in beef.
I'll try to make a pic.
"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#32 Vanessa

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 11:37 PM

Could it be something like this? What I'd call a cheffy cut, not something you'd generally get in a butcher.

A reason to be cheerful - spoonful of the ensopada liquid before going to bed. How can something so simple be so tasty? The meat still needs a bit of time to break down that sinewy stuff you get on the breast.

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#33 omnivorette

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Posted 30 January 2005 - 11:41 PM

Does it look like this?

http://www.meatnz.co...n/lamb_3210.htm

Or this? (scroll down, lower right)

http://www.catellibr...vice_lamb_1.asp
"It seems a positively Quixotic quest to defend food from being used as any kind of social signifier, as if it could avoid the fate of each other component of our everyday lives." -Wilfrid

#34 helena

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Posted 31 January 2005 - 12:05 AM

I made pix now but i need to wait until Alex gets back home to download them to my laptop. Judging from the pictures above it seems like it's cut from a top round as for cutlet looking like a flank steak.
"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#35 helena

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Posted 31 January 2005 - 03:03 AM

Posted Image
"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#36 Vanessa

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Posted 01 February 2005 - 08:19 AM

Lamb stock completed this morning. I finished simmering it last night and left overnight to cool down. This morning strained and the fat had solidified enough without refrigeration to strain itself out as well. Usually I would now boil down further to concentrate before freezing but on tasting it seemed quite lamby enough - unusually flavourful for a stock at this stage. Decanted into plastic containers and froze. A very dark colour it is considering there was no roasting of the bones - perhaps due to use of a red onion (I don't peel onions for stock).

I've really enjoyed this animal. No question that I'll be acquiring another one in some months time and having more fun.

v
...it actually comes down to what thrills you - Hugh Johnson

authenticity is a fog that recedes just when you think you may be getting near it - R Schonfeld

The most political act we do on a daily basis is to eat - Prof J Pretty

this city without boundaries we all share - zigzackly


#37 Liza

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Posted 12 March 2008 - 12:05 PM

I thought we had a mutton thread?

Anyhoo, here's this:
http://lifeandhealth...2264245,00.html

“And another thing. You don't have to "move on" either. Not until you're ready. People say, Oh, you should be grateful. They say, Oh, it's time for you to move on. I'm like, What are you, a cop with a nightstick? I'll move on when I'm done playing the blues on my harmonica, thank you very much.

Really, people will tell you all kinds of garbage. Don't believe it.

You don't have to move on until you're ready.”

#38 SRD

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 05:57 PM

For us, lamb shoulder (on the bone) is for roasting, stud with rosemary and garlic, then Gas6/7 for 20 minutes, then 20 minutes a pound at gas 4/5. Rest for 10 minutes before carving. We like our lamb pink. The remainder is minced for shepherds pie.
Leg of lamb is usually butterflied and BBQ'd, preferably using Elizabeth Luard's version of furria-furria. Scallions, halved if of the large continental variety, and soused in olive oil before BBQ'ing, are an excellent accompaniment.
The neck fillet can be chunked for kebabs or fried whole and cut into medallions with a suitable gravy.
We rarely bother with chops.
The best lamb I've eaten was Essex salt marsh lamb which came from The Food Company in Essex http://www.thefoodco...o.uk/index.html closely followed by a tiny shoulder from a Soay sheep grown at Norwood Farm, Norton St Phillip in Somerset http://www.soilassoc...33;OpenDocument .
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#39 flyfish

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 10:06 PM

We are having lamb tomorrow. I am glad we bought it earlier in the week; the stores were jammed today. You;d think they'd been closed for a week rather than just yesterday. It's a boneless roast; I don't know what Mr. Fly is planning to do with it but I will report back.
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#40 Squeat Mungry

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Posted 22 March 2008 - 11:08 PM

I love to eat lamb but rarely cook it. Today I bought a boneless leg which I'll be cooking tomorrow for a small gathering at my neighbors' house. I'm not sure, but I think I'm going to try to follow Judy Rodgers' instructions in the Zuni Cafe Cookbook. That means seasoning it now, I think, and a simple roast tomorrow. I'll report.

Happy holiday (whichever you celebrate, or not) everyone!
It is a pretty poem, Mr. Pope, but you must not call it Homer. -- Richard Bentley

#41 Squeat Mungry

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Posted 23 March 2008 - 01:37 AM

Okay, so I trimmed and seasoned the lamb according to Rodgers' directions. Yay. It will be roasted tomorrow.

But now I'm left with about half a pound of fat/trimmings and maybe 3/4 cup of blood. No bones = no stock, right? So what do I do with this extra stuff?
It is a pretty poem, Mr. Pope, but you must not call it Homer. -- Richard Bentley

#42 tsquare

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Posted 23 March 2008 - 01:41 AM

I'm cooking Marcus Samuelsson's Za'atar Roasted Leg of Lamb, from "The Soul of a new cuisine." Seems very familiar flavor-wise, with black olive oil paste, sesame, anchovies, rosemary, garlic...

#43 SeaGal

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Posted 23 March 2008 - 01:57 AM

QUOTE(Squeat Mungry @ Mar 22 2008, 04:08 PM) View Post
I love to eat lamb but rarely cook it. Today I bought a boneless leg which I'll be cooking tomorrow for a small gathering at my neighbors' house. I'm not sure, but I think I'm going to try to follow Judy Rodgers' instructions in the Zuni Cafe Cookbook. That means seasoning it now, I think, and a simple roast tomorrow. I'll report.

Happy holiday (whichever you celebrate, or not) everyone!



QUOTE(Squeat Mungry @ Mar 22 2008, 06:37 PM) View Post
Okay, so I trimmed and seasoned the lamb according to Rodgers' directions. Yay. It will be roasted tomorrow.

But now I'm left with about half a pound of fat/trimmings and maybe 3/4 cup of blood. No bones = no stock, right? So what do I do with this extra stuff?

I think Rogers' method of pre-salting/seasoning is brilliant. I haven't tried it with lamb, but if it's anywhere near as good as the rack of pork treatment, you're in for a treat. Next time you buy boneless, see if the butcher has any bones (lots of stores sell the lamb bones when they're boning out a lot of legs) and you can make a nice lamb stock. No good ideas for trim and blood. Wait a minute, how did you end up with 3/4 cup of lamb blood, anyway?
Jan
Seattle, WA USA

"But there's tacos, Randy. You know how I feel about tacos. It's the only food shaped like a smile....A beef smile."
--Earl (Jason Lee), from "My Name is Earl", Episode: South of the Border Part Uno, Season 2

#44 Squeat Mungry

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Posted 23 March 2008 - 02:07 AM

Well it was half a cup at least, I was surprised at how much blood there was.

Next time I will ask for bones. Thank you!

I'm looking forward to the roast. Judy Rodgers' methods have so far proved infallible for me.
It is a pretty poem, Mr. Pope, but you must not call it Homer. -- Richard Bentley

#45 SeaGal

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Posted 24 March 2008 - 10:53 PM

QUOTE(Squeat Mungry @ Mar 22 2008, 07:07 PM) View Post
Well it was half a cup at least, I was surprised at how much blood there was.

Next time I will ask for bones. Thank you!

I'm looking forward to the roast. Judy Rodgers' methods have so far proved infallible for me.


So, how did it turn out?
Jan
Seattle, WA USA

"But there's tacos, Randy. You know how I feel about tacos. It's the only food shaped like a smile....A beef smile."
--Earl (Jason Lee), from "My Name is Earl", Episode: South of the Border Part Uno, Season 2