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How the Hipsters Killed the Market


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#1 joethefoodie

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 11:07 AM

From the Missoulian, posted by a cheffy friend of mine.

 

How the Hipsters...

 

Sipping on their lattes, deep in conversation, they care more about the scene than the cilantro. They might purchase a breakfast taco, but no basil. Maybe a pint of strawberries, but no rhubarb. And in their unhurried schmoozing they clog the aisles like arterial plaque, impeding the flow of serious shoppers looking for actual produce. When you factor in the strollers, sometimes two abreast, and perhaps an impromptu reunion from the previous night’s jam band concert, it’s a recipe for gridlock. And that’s if you can even get to the market in the first place, because parking absolutely sucks. The serious produce shoppers, according to the Post, would sooner just go to the store than deal with the festive throng. And the millennials, statistically, are more likely to go out to eat.

 

 



#2 voyager

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 01:29 PM

From the Missoulian, posted by a cheffy friend of mine.

 

How the Hipsters...

 

Sipping on their lattes, deep in conversation, they care more about the scene than the cilantro. They might purchase a breakfast taco, but no basil. Maybe a pint of strawberries, but no rhubarb. And in their unhurried schmoozing they clog the aisles like arterial plaque, impeding the flow of serious shoppers looking for actual produce. When you factor in the strollers, sometimes two abreast, and perhaps an impromptu reunion from the previous night’s jam band concert, it’s a recipe for gridlock. And that’s if you can even get to the market in the first place, because parking absolutely sucks. The serious produce shoppers, according to the Post, would sooner just go to the store than deal with the festive throng. And the millennials, statistically, are more likely to go out to eat.

 

 

Who'da thought: a review of Ferry Plaza in the Missoulian!


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#3 Daniel

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 02:39 PM

I feel the same way about the old folks at Zabar's and Citarella.. It's 6 o clock at night, why the hell do you wait until rush hour to do your shopping... You are retired, you don't need to be on our ridiculous work day schedule.. 

 

It's a free economy, there seems to be enough for both the Meat Market and the Plant Market.. No doubt, young people are annoying and cook less. 


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#4 voyager

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 02:43 PM

I feel the same way about the old folks at Zabar's and Citarella.. It's 6 o clock at night, why the hell do you wait until rush hour to do your shopping... You are retired, you don't need to be on our ridiculous work day schedule.. 

 

+1      Same with those who shop and have hair done on weekends when they have all week to do it. 


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#5 Wilfrid

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 03:02 PM

"Get outta da way." :D

#6 Steve R.

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 03:03 PM

That's why we retirees eat dinner by 6pm. We're trying to stay out of the way & not interfere with the youngstas.

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#7 joethefoodie

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 03:16 PM

Personally, I like Union Square around lunchtime in the summer. That's when there's the greatest "scenery." And I myself don't have much problem shoving through the throngs and throwing a few elbows. My real wish is that people leave their dogs at home, as I think it's really not that much fun for the mutt.



#8 taion

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 03:19 PM

Pretty sure the root issues with parking far predate the hipsters...


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#9 Orik

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 03:38 PM

There's been an ongoing process of markets being transformed from pure retail to retail + dining / snacking that's driven by a combination of nobody cooking and tourists. The nyc greenmarkets are in a tough spot because they're not allowed to do that, but of course you see it in Chelsea Market and in many places in Europe because the same demographic and suburban big box driven processes affect everyone. 


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#10 joethefoodie

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 04:37 PM

There's been an ongoing process of markets being transformed from pure retail to retail + dining / snacking that's driven by a combination of nobody cooking and tourists. The nyc greenmarkets are in a tough spot because they're not allowed to do that, but of course you see it in Chelsea Market and in many places in Europe because the same demographic and suburban big box driven processes affect everyone. 

 

Right.  I hope they don't change the "rules" for nyc greenmarkets to allow cooking, other than the demo stuff they already allow.



#11 Sneakeater

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 04:54 PM

Not trying to stir up any pots, but this was exactly Suzanne's complaint about the New Amsterdam market.


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#12 Suzanne F

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 04:58 PM

Not trying to stir up any pots, but this was exactly Suzanne's complaint about the New Amsterdam market.

 

Thanks for remembering.

 

 

There's been an ongoing process of markets being transformed from pure retail to retail + dining / snacking that's driven by a combination of nobody cooking and tourists. The nyc greenmarkets are in a tough spot because they're not allowed to do that, but of course you see it in Chelsea Market and in many places in Europe because the same demographic and suburban big box driven processes affect everyone. 

 

Right.  I hope they don't change the "rules" for nyc greenmarkets to allow cooking, other than the demo stuff they already allow.

 

+1

 

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#13 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 05:14 PM

 

There's been an ongoing process of markets being transformed from pure retail to retail + dining / snacking that's driven by a combination of nobody cooking and tourists. The nyc greenmarkets are in a tough spot because they're not allowed to do that, but of course you see it in Chelsea Market and in many places in Europe because the same demographic and suburban big box driven processes affect everyone. 

 

Right.  I hope they don't change the "rules" for nyc greenmarkets to allow cooking, other than the demo stuff they already allow.

 

I think that's really shortsighted.  If markets need prepared food to work, then we should encourage that.  You just don't want to manage it to the detriment of the farmers.


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#14 Anthony Bonner

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 05:14 PM

Not trying to stir up any pots, but this was exactly Suzanne's complaint about the New Amsterdam market.

yeah, and she's still wrong about it.


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#15 Melonius Thunk

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 11:53 AM

 

There's been an ongoing process of markets being transformed from pure retail to retail + dining / snacking that's driven by a combination of nobody cooking and tourists. The nyc greenmarkets are in a tough spot because they're not allowed to do that, but of course you see it in Chelsea Market and in many places in Europe because the same demographic and suburban big box driven processes affect everyone. 

 

Right.  I hope they don't change the "rules" for nyc greenmarkets to allow cooking, other than the demo stuff they already allow.

 

Chelsea market is a total disaster for anyone who want to buy food.  It is thronged with 30 something tourists taking photos of everything, blocking the way and filling the chairs.  The Lobster Place has more lookers than buyers.  Taking pictures of fish and bumping into shoppers. The line for the loo is about 30 minutes.  I shop like a hunter--find it buy it and leave.  But the pleasure of shopping there has diminished over the years despite the good stuff.


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