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Roasted Dry Aged Duck Breast, Spiced Apples, Tangerines


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#1 Rail Paul

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 06:42 PM

NJ restaurant supplier Fossil Farms has re-launched its website and retail store in Boonton.  They have an interesting recipe for Roasted Dry Aged Alina Duck Breast, Spiced Apple Butter, Tangerine Marmalade, served with a wilted lettuce.  They are also launching a catering operation, which I don't believe they've had in the past.

 

(Full disclosure, one of the principals is married to one of my former co-workers. I've always been delighted with the products I've selected there.)

 

I noticed that they no longer carry the Mangalitsa pork from Mosewood Farm, up in Branchville

 

 

http://www.fossilfarms.com/chef-nick-cataldo


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#2 Suzanne F

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 10:15 PM

I was hoping they'd explain the "dry aged" part somewhere, since I've never heard of such a thing for poultry and I'm curious. But in the recipe, you just remove the breast and cook it, and the website says nothing (that I could find) about aging ducks.


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

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#3 Wilfrid

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 11:53 PM

Roberta's (and then Blanca) were serving long-aged duck, and I assume dry rather than wet aged.

I know I had it at Blanca.

#4 Rail Paul

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 12:29 AM

My father in law used to age duck and pheasant. Sometimes in the fridge for a week, sometimes hanging in the attic in winter.
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#5 voyager

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 12:30 AM

I was hoping they'd explain the "dry aged" part somewhere, since I've never heard of such a thing for poultry and I'm curious. But in the recipe, you just remove the breast and cook it, and the website says nothing (that I could find) about aging duck...

 

Is duck prosciutto not dry aged, albeit salted?  http://www.saltedand...ast-prosciutto/


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#6 Suzanne F

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 01:30 AM

I wouldn't consider duck prosciutto (of which I currently have a piece) the same. This recipe just starts with removing the breast from the duck, then later you salt it and sauté it; no aging mentioned.

 

If anyone knows the how of duck breasts are aged, please do tell. TIA.


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#7 AaronS

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 03:38 AM

I think the duck on the roberta's tasting menu was dry aged. it was really, really good.

#8 Orik

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 01:08 AM

I wouldn't consider duck prosciutto (of which I currently have a piece) the same. This recipe just starts with removing the breast from the duck, then later you salt it and sauté it; no aging mentioned.
 
If anyone knows the how of duck breasts are aged, please do tell. TIA.


The breast comes from a whole duck that's been dry-aged. It's perhaps incorrectly assumed the reader can figure this out.

As for duck prosciutto, there are two distinct classes of product - breast (preferably from force fed duck) that's been rubbed in a modest amount of curing salts and then hung for some weeks, and the massively salted near-jerky you see often around your parts.
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#9 Suzanne F

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 01:22 PM

 

I wouldn't consider duck prosciutto (of which I currently have a piece) the same. This recipe just starts with removing the breast from the duck, then later you salt it and sauté it; no aging mentioned.
 
If anyone knows the how of duck breasts are aged, please do tell. TIA.


The breast comes from a whole duck that's been dry-aged. It's perhaps incorrectly assumed the reader can figure this out.

As for duck prosciutto, there are two distinct classes of product - breast (preferably from force fed duck) that's been rubbed in a modest amount of curing salts and then hung for some weeks, and the massively salted near-jerky you see often around your parts.

 

 

So "dry aging" is what used to be called "hanging"? Sheesh. And it's done for farmed birds, not just wild?


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#10 Wilfrid

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 02:44 PM

That's an interesting question, because I don't know what the difference in the process might be, but I have the impression that dry aging lasts a lot longer than the typical couple of days for hanging.



#11 paryzer

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 03:44 PM

Chef John McGannon has an  interesting article and video on dry aging ducks. After seeing the video, I don't think I could ever eat a NON dry aged duck again.

 

"The first thing we need to understand is what waterfowl are- they are the equivalent to Olympic athletes. When you think about it, all they do is migrate thousands of miles only to return a couple of months later. Have you ever wondered why their muscles are so dark? Well they have this process called “re-oxygenation,” it allows them to fly for hundreds of miles at a time – they have twice the amount of capillary blood than a land animal. Hence the deep dark almost eggplant color of their flesh. This extra blood keeps their heart and lungs supplied with the needed oxygen during these long flights.

This is great for the birds but not so much for us. The capillary blood that's in your muscle structure is the broken down bi-product of what you eat. So, if you’re a duck eating aquatic plant life out of the bottom of a muddy slough and that flesh is consumed in its fresh state it's going to taste like the bottom of a muddy slough.

The only NATURAL way to remove this excess blood AND breakdown this highly developed muscle structure is through “DRY AGING.”

 

http://www.outdoorne...fowl-dry-aging/


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#12 Rail Paul

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 04:47 PM

That's a very useful video, thanks for linking it.


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#13 Rich

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 05:26 PM

Found some dry-aged kale in my veg bin yesterday.



#14 Suzanne F

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 05:49 PM

Found some dry-aged kale in my veg bin yesterday.

:gold:

 

Re paryzer's quote and the video: Again, that's WILD birds. Who does this with farmed ducks? Is it necessary, since they have lived a relatively easy life?


I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#15 Wilfrid

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 06:16 PM

I suspect most of the dry-aged ducks on New York menus (EMP used to have one, Roberta's) are farmed ducks.  Wild ducks are really very noticeably different in size, taste, and texture.  Very rarely seen in New York restaurants.

 

That video troubles me a little, because the intention seems to be to rid game of the blood which is the vehicle for the "gamey" flavor.  A "mild" result, he says.