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#1 Stone

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 06:41 PM

Simple stuff, right?  Not for me.

Whether cooking long grain or short grain, my end result ranges from glop to overly-sticky.

I cook it on the stove top.  Rinse the rice.  Add with water (usually 1:1.5 rice to water).  Bring to a boil. Cover and reduce to a simmer.  Cook until done.

 

Is there an easier/better method that doesn't involve buying a rice cooker or an instapot?

 



#2 Behemoth

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 08:22 PM

I dunno, what I do is similar but I've been quite happy with the results: 

 

1. rinse -- this means swirling the rice in repeated amounts of water, until water runs clear. I definitely notice a difference between when I take my time and when I'm in a hurry. 

2. water to rice ratio: i.5 works for some types of rice but not all. More failsafe for me has always been the "water up to first knuckle" method. At this point I can just eye it. 

3. bring to boil, cover and simmer on very low heat for 15 minutes, fluff with fork, re-cover, and let sit for another 5 minutes.

 

Wierdly, my (German) SIL cooks rice in a large amount of water for 15 minutes then drains it. I was skeptical but it's not bad. (Slightly different texture though.) 

 

 

Hm, but maybe my rice is sticky by your standards? I don't know, I usually make it for asian food where some stickiness is good. If you want grains to be separate, you can toss the rice in a little warm oil or butter at the beginning, before adding cooking water (that would be the Lebanese way). Or you can add a tbsp of butter with the water (I do this sometimes with basmati). 


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#3 Stone

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 08:51 PM

Perhaps a little butter.  I try to get separate grains, like basmati.

 

Oh -- does basmati rice have to come from India (or a particular part) to get the real good basmati flavor?  I've bought some domestic basmati recently, and it tastes like rice.



#4 joethefoodie

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 09:41 PM

The rinsing (and draining) is important...you could be carrying an extra 1/4 or 1/2 cup of water if you don't drain well.  

 

I like a 1:1.5 ratio, but (real) basmati can take a little less...1:1.25 maybe.  Nothing wrong with a little butter (or olive oil) and salt.

 

Cook 15-17 minutes at the lowest possible simmer. Then, before I fluff, I actually lift the lid up, cover the pot with a clean kitchen towel and re-cover the pot.  Let it sit there for 10 minutes, then fluff and eat.

 

The boiling water (aka pasta method) works well, especially if you're using the rice for a rice salad or something along those lines.



#5 AaronS

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 09:56 PM

I've found some of my pots make much better rice than others, not sure what the pattern is.

#6 joethefoodie

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 11:12 PM

I literally have the most success with a old $25 T-Fal 2-quart pot, with a glass lid that has a tiny little hole in it to let steam out.

 

It's like one in this set...T Fal

 

Edited to change the 3-quart to the 2-quart that I actually use.



#7 voyager

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 11:35 PM

Truc: a two tine fork from a carving set is great for fluffing rice or anything that you want to separate into single grains.

 

I cook rice in a 1 qt Le Creuset.    Bring to a boil, turn flame down too extra low, stir then cover and cook for 15 minutes.   Fluff, recover and let steam another 10 to 15.    Works with pearl and long grain including basmati.    We like pearl or Japanese rice "clumpy", but long grain separated.     I always use the rice to water proportions suggested on the bag.   I cut the cooking instructions panel from the bag and leave it with the rice in a glass snap-lid jar so I never have to guess.


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#8 Orik

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 12:40 AM

1.25 or even less for basmati, which you often don't need to rinse. Small pot. That's it.

Short grain I either do donabe (long soak, quick cook), rice cooker, risotto or paella-ish, never really tried to cook it in a pot.
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#9 splinky

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 05:46 AM

sounds like too much water and too large of a pot. also, you can microwave basmati rice and get really nice separate grains


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#10 voyager

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 10:40 AM

sounds like too much water and too large of a pot

 

Whose?


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#11 Chambolle

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 12:57 PM

Rice cooker ... surely a cheapo one

 

It's late and I don't want to wait ... but I like good eats

 

How much of a difference in taste and time to cook for cooking by pushing the normal button vs the fast button ?

 

I need an answer within the amount of time it takes to measure and wash rice ... but I'm a thorough washer ... 4-5 minutes maybe 10 cuz I'm first opening a bottle of sake ... maybe a GT2 ... but they go fast

 

eta - This rice from Niigata Prefecture and yes, bought at Omotesando  N'ESPACE



#12 Chambolle

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 01:12 PM

Alright GT3 is on track ... and that goes pretty damn fast too

 

And if I don't here anything by then it's probably not going to matter all that much anyway ... and I'll just go for speed



#13 prasantrin

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 01:27 PM

I use the "fast" setting, and I don't notice a difference but if there is a difference, when you're hungry fast is good enough.

 

You use 180ml of rice (there should have been a scoop that came with the rice cooker) and then when it's in the pot, fill with water up to the first line in the pot. Oh, wait, you didn't ask about that. But I told you anyway.



#14 Chambolle

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 01:36 PM

It's been on FAST for 15 minutes now ... I'll tell you when it's done ... the sake's good though !

 

2 cups of rice ... water ... bottled water even, not bad eh? ... poured just less than 1/2" above rice, I'd say ... no supplied scoop AFAIK ... but you know these FF Tok rentals, right Pras ... it's a total crap shoot ... I'm gonna take this to the Supper thread ...



#15 Chambolle

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Posted 09 October 2019 - 01:45 PM

Pras ! 

 

I've used it before ... twice ... only on fast .. but I never looked at before ... it's now counting down til BLAST OFF ... twas at 7 now 6 ... minutes !

 

Buckle up !