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#16 joethefoodie

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 07:11 PM

My first batch of pre-holiday cookies. I don't necessarily bake holiday cookies, but I like to bake cookies for the holidays. And one day last week it was cool enough to turn my oven on. So...

 

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Crispy oatmeal cookies with fleur de sel.



#17 prasantrin

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 07:19 PM

Crispy oatmeal cookies? Care to share your recipe? Every recipe I've tried is cakey, and I dislike cakey cookies. But crispy oatmeal is one of my favorites!

#18 Behemoth

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 11:02 PM

The Braune Kuchen dough has been in the fridge since November 1st. Next weekend I'll make the stollen as it needs 2 weeks storage, and maybe the gingerbread so I have less to do later. Weekend of 23rd I will do absolutely nothing Christmas related, but the weekend after that is 1st Advent aka hardcore baking weekend. Er, unless we're off skiing which I fear we may be.In which case I guess I will be baking on weeknight evenings. I don't think I'll change much if anything from the ones I did last year. 

 

@Pras -- have you tried oatmeal lace cookies? 


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#19 joethefoodie

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Posted 13 November 2019 - 02:16 PM

Crispy oatmeal cookies? Care to share your recipe? Every recipe I've tried is cakey, and I dislike cakey cookies. But crispy oatmeal is one of my favorites!

Sure - this is from the WaPo, and it was basically stolen from Cook's Illustrated, with one or two minor changes (I've changed the changes back in RED).  I think technique is pretty important for these; i.e. bake one sheet at a time; use Quaker Oats real old-fashioned oats (not instant, not quick cooking, etc.); and let the cookies cool completely on the sheet pan on a rack.  That said...

 

SERVINGS: 2 DOZEN COOKIES INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup flour (140 grams)
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, or 1/4 tsp table salt
  • 14 tablespoons (1 3/4 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature but still cool (about 65 degrees)
  • 3/4 cup sugar  (1 cup sugar, 200 grams)
  • 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar  (55 grams)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats (2.5 cups - Quaker)
  • 2 cups unsweetened shredded coconut  (feh - leave this out as coconut has no business being in oatmeal cookies)
      fleur de sel or similar for sprinkling on cookies prior to baking

 

Position an oven rack in the middle of the oven; preheat to 350 degrees. Line 3 large baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone liners.  Use parchment!

 

Whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl.

 

Combine the butter and sugars in the bowl of a stand mixer or hand-held electric mixer; beat for about 20 seconds on medium-low speed until just combined, then increase the speed to medium and beat for about 1 minute, until light and fluffy. Scrape down the sides of the bowl.

 

Reduce the speed to medium-low, then add the egg and vanilla extract; beat for about 30 seconds, until fully incorporated. Scrape down the sides of the bowl.

 

Reduce the speed to low, then add the flour mixture and beat for about 10 seconds, just until incorporated. Gradually add the oats and coconut; beat for about 20 seconds. Use a flexible spatula to give the dough a final stir so that no pockets of flour or oats remain.

 

Divide the dough into 24 equal portions, each about 2 tablespoons (or use a #30 cookie scoop). (I weigh the dough to 32 grams per cookie).  Use the palms of your hands to roll the portions into balls; place them on the baking sheets, spaced about 1 1/2 inches apart (8 dough balls per sheet). Use your fingertips to gently flatten each ball to a thickness of 1/2 inch.

 

Bake 1 sheet at a time for 7 minutes, then rotate the sheet front to back. Bake for 6 to 9 minutes, until golden brown. The cookies will spread.  (They should be brown and crispy at edges, a little soft in middle; I find this takes close to 16 or 17 minutes, and as they cool, they will crisp up even more!)

 

Transfer the baking sheet to a wire rack to cool completely (on the sheet) before serving or storing. Repeat to use all of the dough.



#20 Behemoth

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Posted 17 November 2019 - 09:37 PM

Stollen done and packed away until 1. Dec.

Now for Thanksgiving...


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#21 StephanieL

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Posted 19 November 2019 - 04:09 AM

N is going to make this cake for New Year's.  It'll be a nice change of pace after a month or so of fruit and spice desserts.


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#22 Behemoth

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Posted 19 November 2019 - 10:32 PM

Gingersnaps! But mainly because I substituted caramel cookies in my pumpkin pie crust last year and wasn't happy with the crumb. 


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#23 Orik

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Posted 20 November 2019 - 01:55 AM

In Japan we had a tradition of making a dozen or so Christmas cakes around this time of year, feeding them until late December, and giving them away to friends with the warning that each thin slice has about a shot of rum in it. You could always tell who had poor impulse control the next morning. 


sandwiches that are large and filling and do not contain tuna or prawns

#24 Evelyn

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Posted 20 November 2019 - 03:50 AM

In Japan we had a tradition of making a dozen or so Christmas cakes around this time of year, feeding them until late December, and giving them away to friends with the warning that each thin slice has about a shot of rum in it. You could always tell who had poor impulse control the next morning. 

 

Care to share the recipe? I have a few friends whose impulse control I would like to test  :ph43r: