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Cardoons


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#1 tanabutler

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 05:14 PM

After having the delicious cardoon soup at Boulette's Larder, I want to get some cardoons now...and this morning I found this nice post by a blogger.

Ironically, Mariquita doesn't do any local farmers markets, just the one in San Francisco.

#2 Farid

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 05:56 PM

Clifford Wright on artichokes and cardoons

It will be the purpose of this article to support the argument that the artichoke does not grow wild, that it was developed from the cardoon by the Arabs or Berbers, and that it was unknown in the Greco-Roman world.1


unfortunately this Arab/Berber doesn't have any recipes for either.

#3 Guest_Suzanne F_*

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 06:57 PM

When I first brought home cardoons, I found a recipe in New Food of Life by Najmieh Batmanglij, a book of "Ancient Persian and Modern Iranian Cooking" for Khoresh-e kangar: a stew of cardoons, onions, meat (I believe I used beef, although lamb, veal, and chicken are also listed as possiblities), flavored with turmeric, parsley, mint, verjuice, and saffron. It was delicious, and worth all the work of cleaning the cardoons as described in the Sardine blog.

#4 tanabutler

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 07:57 PM

Clifford Wright on artichokes and cardoons

It will be the purpose of this article to support the argument that the artichoke does not grow wild, that it was developed from the cardoon by the Arabs or Berbers, and that it was unknown in the Greco-Roman world.1


unfortunately this Arab/Berber doesn't have any recipes for either.

Whoa. That man is SMART.

Thanks for that link, Farid.

#5 Farid

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 08:13 PM

Clifford Wright on artichokes and cardoons

It will be the purpose of this article to support the argument that the artichoke does not grow wild, that it was developed from the cardoon by the Arabs or Berbers, and that it was unknown in the Greco-Roman world.1


unfortunately this Arab/Berber doesn't have any recipes for either.

Whoa. That man is SMART.

Thanks for that link, Farid.

He's my fwend. Totally cool man, down to earth, funny, easy going. Oddly the writers I know who actually know about food tend to be really nice, friendly and open to learning.

Tana, you can add cardoons to a number of my Algerian recipes. The lamb with olives, couscous with seven vegetables, white bean stew, harira, just to name a few.

Cardoons are REALLY good.

#6 Guest_Adam_*

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 11:23 AM

T- the last time I was in Italy I bought some interesting local veg, including cardoons, and cooked them very simply and served them with lemon and olive oil.

In Tuscany there are a very common winter veg (you see them in peoples gardens ever-where in the country), they are often used to make a sort of thick eggy souffle or fritters.


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#7 Guest_Suzanne F_*

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 02:32 PM

That looks wonderful. What is the veg at the right, the thin, dark green stringy one?

#8 Guest_Adam_*

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 03:08 PM

The green grassy stuff is agretti. It is quite succulant (like samphire) and tastes like good green beans. One of the earliest greens in Italy.

#9 helena

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 04:01 PM

i made cardoon gratin recently from Babbo cookbook - it was very nice but it was a PITA to clean them (stinging) and they boiled unevenly (i used the Schneider's suggestion to cardoons them after the boiling).

Now i am looking at the Wolfert's recipe for leeks simmered in olive oil and she suggests the technique works well with cardoons though i suspect they should be parboiled anyway?

"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#10 Suzanne F

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Posted 12 October 2007 - 09:30 PM

Oh, yes, that's a tasty one, that gratin. Even Paul, who has a pathological fear of cream, liked it.

Not sure about the parboiling -- I think I did the first time I cooked them, but not since. But I did learn to wear gloves when trimming them. Those mothers HURT! angry.gif

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#11 helena

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Posted 13 October 2007 - 12:23 AM

Suzanne, thanks for an invaluable tip on gloves!
And speaking of cardoon recipes i just stumbled on Pino Luongo's cardoon risotto with white truffle - but even w/o truffle it sounds pretty neat - cardoons are parboiled then half of them are pureed into a broth while the rest is sliced.
"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#12 Suzanne F

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 01:04 AM

Gonna have to try that! Thanks!!

I don't actually know what a handbasket is -- but whatever they are, singer-songwriters are in the first ones going to hell. -- Sneakeater, 29 March 2018 - 12:06 AM

 

notorious stickler -- NY Times
deeply annoying and nitpicking -- Molly O'Neill, One Big Table


#13 helena

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Posted 14 October 2007 - 01:19 AM

Janet Mendel's excellent Cooking from the Heart of Spain (imho way more interesting that her previous spanish cookbook that is more traditional) has a recipe for a cheezy (manchego cheezy of course) artichoke gratin cooked in cazuela, and gives a pretty vague sketch for a cardoon variation - "they need to be peeled, then cooked slowly until very tender".
Well, i'm trying this asap.

"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#14 Elissa

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 10:41 PM

Love Wolfert's coddled leek recipe - is that the one you mean helena?

I had cardoons once (and most deliciously) with a Bagna Cauda at Otto.
i find it wildly amusing because i'm mildly drunk. -helena

#15 Behemoth

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 11:26 PM

Cardoons are stewed in olive oil in Lebanon, IIRC most people hire someone to peel them. I don't have a recipe but it is probably similar to what they do with green beans.
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