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#1 Liza

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 12:40 AM

Heaps of thanks to Priscilla for sending me what has become a valued tool - the Happy Baby food grinder. No batteries, no plugs. Just a tiny food mill that roughly purees everything. Par example: we had edamame - Jack had pureed edamame. It's small and compact and hand powered and we can take it anywhere.

Ok. That and our microplane grater.
“And another thing. You don't have to "move on" either. Not until you're ready. People say, Oh, you should be grateful. They say, Oh, it's time for you to move on. I'm like, What are you, a cop with a nightstick? I'll move on when I'm done playing the blues on my harmonica, thank you very much.

Really, people will tell you all kinds of garbage. Don't believe it.

You don't have to move on until you're ready.”

#2 Cathy

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 02:15 PM

Definitely the microplane grater. I also go through a lot of parchment paper (lining the pan before roasting vegetables).

Heatproof spatulas have become indispensables. And though I don't need it often, I wouldn't be without my food mill - especially for puréeing raspberries into sauce.
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#3 g.johnson

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 02:21 PM

Big knife.
The Obnoxious Glyn Johnson

#4 Wilfrid1

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 02:25 PM

The vegetable peeler sold by the English geezer out of a box on Union Square for five bucks. It's pretty good.
Elect-a-lujah

***Every Monday***At the Sign of the Pink Pig.

If the author could go around the place hitting random readers with a rubber hammer, the Pink Pig would still be worth a visit.

#5 Guest_Adam_*

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 04:27 PM

Microplane
Japanese ginger grater (no more threads etc)
Garlic crusher
Cork screw

#6 Cathy

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 04:44 PM

Thanks, Adam, I forgot to mention the ceramic ginger grater.
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#7 Liza

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 04:59 PM

Thanks, Adam, I forgot to mention the ceramic ginger grater.

Details, please. I just use my microplane grater for ginger, too. Works very well.
“And another thing. You don't have to "move on" either. Not until you're ready. People say, Oh, you should be grateful. They say, Oh, it's time for you to move on. I'm like, What are you, a cop with a nightstick? I'll move on when I'm done playing the blues on my harmonica, thank you very much.

Really, people will tell you all kinds of garbage. Don't believe it.

You don't have to move on until you're ready.”

#8 Priscilla

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 05:04 PM

Liza, we depended upon our Happy Baby food grinder lo those 12ish years ago. I am so glad Baby Jack is benefiting. A wonderful tool. Mummy and Daddy enjoying handmade skinny fresh pasta with Marcella Hazan's touch of the roast sauce? So does Baby, courtesy of the Happy Baby. Mummy and Daddy enjoying quite-trad shashlik? So does Baby, & etc.

Otherwise: Tongs, three lengths (you heard!), locking, stainless steel, & etc. Heatproof spatulas, check. (So nice of W-S to have pink ones a couple of springs ago.) Microplane, check. Non-stick saute pans. Not-non-stick saute pans. This one 6-qt. All-Clad Master Chef large-diameter saucepan that gets called into use all the time, not deep not shallow, but Goldilocksly just right.

My ginger grater, my PRESENT ginger grater, since I broke the white ceram one a few years ago, is an anodized aluminum with spikey-spikes affair, and man, does it grate ginger LAMF. I love it. No fibers, little (ginger) juice reservoir at the one end, aaah, beeyootiful.

#9 Guest_Adam_*

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 05:09 PM

Thanks, Adam, I forgot to mention the ceramic ginger grater.

Details, please. I just use my microplane grater for ginger, too. Works very well.

Japanese Porcelain Ginger Grater are a flat piece of ceramic with loads of little ceramic teeth/ pyramids. Reduces even the most stubborn giner to puree with no fuss.

Advantages:

Seperates the flesh from the strings
Rinses perfectly clean under a running tap, no issues with cleaning out the strings like with the microplane.

Disadvantages:

Only does puree

#10 helena

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 06:10 PM

Two food processors;
Thai stone mortar;
Coffee grinder for grinding spices;

Most precious cooking vessel: clay cazuela.
"farangs are full of surprises. It's the erudition that impresses her, not the quality of the evidence." Bangkok 8

#11 Cathy

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 06:11 PM

Thanks, Priscilla, I forgot to mention the spring-loaded tongs. Two lengths.

Oh, and the grill brush: one side wire bristles, the other heavy-duty-scrubby stuff.
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#12 Priscilla

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 07:00 PM

Wow Cathy I could use such a two-sided grill brush. The Janus head of grill brushes. I shall look when next in Home Depot, hopefully before I reach the edge of despair after fruitlessly searching for the thing I went in there fto get. A game of minutes.

I consistently advocate no wire brush, believing that it scratches and causes excessive sticking, but I am consistently ignored by the one wire-brush-brush-brushing, WHILST I am so advocating.

A heavy-duty scrubby thing on a stick, I can wrap my mind around. Course the Mad Wire Brush Wielder's point is always the same, dropping a new grill on the old Weber costs all of $12 or similar and so what if we replace it a couple times a year.

#13 Cathy

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 08:52 PM

Sigh. Of course the brush I like has been discontinued, which I discovered while googling for a picture and a source.

It had a handle instead of a long stick, and the wire brush and scrubby deal were angled so it was easy to use one or the other.

I knew I should have bought five last time I saw them in a housewares store. :angry:
You're only as good as your grease.


When working with high heat, the first contact between the cooking surface and the food must be respected.

-- Francis Mallman







#14 scamhi

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 09:37 PM

some great stuff on this thread.
Happy Baby Grinder...mine is 17years old :lol: product has been on the market for a while

microplane grater...got that too.

steel spring loaded tongs, yes

only have a single sided grill brush :(

ceramic ginger grater...does the job, kind on fingers

le creuset heat resistant spatula and spoonula, get used almost every day

stainless steel scraper for moving chopped small things to the saute pan

screwpull foil cutter, clean cut of the wine's foil top cheap and helpful

Perfex pepper mill, last a lifetime

#15 Priscilla

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 11:20 PM

Instant-read thermometer how could I forget my beloved instant-read thermometer.