Jump to content


Photo

Currently Reading...


  • Please log in to reply
5379 replies to this topic

#5371 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 08 November 2019 - 06:17 AM

Nobody is going to stop me from doing that.

Nobody.
Bar Loser

MF Old

#5372 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 86,539 posts

Posted 10 November 2019 - 12:53 AM

Doesn’t that just self-correct if you’re online? Let’s try.

Bulldog. Drummond.
Bulldog. Drummond.

#5373 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 86,539 posts

Posted 10 November 2019 - 12:53 AM

Yep.

#5374 Sneakeater

Sneakeater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 64,525 posts

Posted 10 November 2019 - 02:00 AM

And then I override it. Probably without effect. But it makes me feel better to try.
Bar Loser

MF Old

#5375 StephanieL

StephanieL

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,361 posts

Posted 10 November 2019 - 04:13 AM

Just finished reading Deborah Blum's The Poison Squad, about the extraordinary efforts of Harvey Washington Wiley and his team at the Department of Agriculture to get poisons, preservatives, and adulterations out of the US food supply.  The 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act, which in effect was only a starting point, is a result of all his labors.

 

Whatever you think about what's in our food now, we can be more or less assured that what the label says is what's in it, even if that label is a list of chemicals as long as your arm.  Basically, from the beginning of the 19th century until a few decades into the 20th century, unless you were wealthy or grew your own food and raised your own livestock, probably everything you ate had been tampered with or adulterated or an outright fake.  How about some formaldehyde in milk?  Maybe you'd care for some rope in that ground pepper?


"Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." --John Steinbeck

 

"Insanity runs in my family.  It practically gallops."--Arsenic and Old Lace

 


#5376 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 86,539 posts

Posted 19 November 2019 - 02:53 AM

Very belatedly, the Beckett trilogy. The virtuoso stylistic changes between Molloy’s, Moran’s, and Malone’s testimony. I’ve read Pinget more than Beckett in the last few years, but I think Pinget would acknowledge his friend’s influence.

#5377 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 86,539 posts

Posted 25 November 2019 - 11:26 PM

Between Fantoine and Agapa, early work by Pinget where he is avowedly playing games with narrative and language. A short collection of very short pieces, surreal and often very funny.

Foursome, Carolyn Burke’s new book about Stieglitz, O’Keefe, Strand, Salsbury, and the invention of the American avant-garde. Highly readable.

#5378 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 86,539 posts

Posted 29 November 2019 - 02:35 AM

“Home to Roost” a Nero Wolfe novella.

This is my ongoing project to read three Wolfe novellas each year, on my birthday, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. That should make them last about as long as I care.

Of course I could just read all the novels again.

#5379 Neocon maudit

Neocon maudit

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,970 posts

Posted 04 December 2019 - 01:37 AM

I seem to read one 'contemporary' novel a year. Last year it was Normal People. This year, to take advantage of an Amazon discount, I bought Early Work, though it will be a week before it's in my [un-Prime] hands. Anyone tried it?



#5380 Wilfrid

Wilfrid

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 86,539 posts

Posted 04 December 2019 - 05:53 PM

Carlos Ruiz Zafon, The Prisoner of Heaven on my overnight to Barcelona. A sequel to the big selling The Shadow of the Wind which I read on last year’s Barca trip.

His characters walk Barcelona block by block, which I find appealing, but I can’t recommend it. It’s the even lighter version of Umberto Eco Lite. Not great writing, and I doubt if it’s the translator’s fault. He knows his history, but the way he tells it leaves it flat.

The Seven Churches by Milos Urban, set in Prague, although overwrought, does the Eco thing better.

But I have Mercè Rodoreda next in the pile.