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Ron Johnson

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Posts posted by Ron Johnson

  1. A dissecting aortic aneurysm is very hard to repair once it starts rupturing. This is the same thing that killed the actor John Ritter despite the fact that he was across the street from a hospital when he collapsed.

    Holbrooke was quite the diplomat. RIP.

  2.  

    And, totally unrelated to what my friend said, and only somewhat substantiated-a rumor heard more than once--seems an Auburn booster made a very substantial donation to Cecil Newton's church. A church the booster had never set foot in.

    That is SEC innovation right there. Brilliant.

    (Checks to see who funds Tebow's dad's missionary work)

     

     

    ETA: Really surprised to hear Malzahn is turning down 3 mil. year for the head job at Vandy. Wonder what else he sees out there.

     

    no one likes to lose, but I'd take 3M a year to be the SEC doormat.

  3. Salad of arugula simply dressed with olive oil, lemon juice and sea salt, topped with quarters of still warm, roasted beets and crumbles of chevre.

     

    Roasted leg of lamb studded with garlic cloves and rosemary sprigs served with caramelized brussel sprouts and potato gratin.

     

    epoisses and asher blue cheese from sweet grass dairy with pickled figs.

     

    assortment of homemade christmas cookies.

     

    2005 Beaucastel CdP

  4. I'd prefer they both go. I'm just looking out for their best interests, since the NCAA isn't quite done with Auburn yet :ph43r: .

    ooohhh. do tell . . .

  5. Might make a difference whether you're talking about the plaintiffs' side or the defense.

    certainly this is true to an extent in that the plaintiff's side is completely unaffected by economic conditions. The reason why I would extend this to the defense side is that if we are still filing cases at the same volume, then they are still defending the same number of cases for which they can still bill, bill, bill. As for whether their clients, such as pharmaceutical companies, are now paying them a lower rate as the result of the recession I have no idea. But, the large firms here that do complex litigation have not laid off associates as we have seen with firms that handle more corporate and transactional work.

     

    again I ask Nathan, do you practice in complex litigation, or is this yet another example of you opining on topics based on things you've heard from others?

     

    I practiced in antitrust and complex contract litigation (and that's exactly the way the firm's website referred to our practice group). I didn't realize you were talking about personal injury (I'm unfamiliar with "complex litigation" as being a synonym for it...apparently we're talking apples and oranges here). I'm perfectly willing to believe that PI has been unaffected by the economic situation.

     

    I am not talking about stand-alone PI cases, those are not complex litigation. I am speaking of national, mass tort cases such as pharmaceutical, medical device, and toxic exposure cases, most notably when they are litigated as part of an MDL. As to why it is termed "complex litigation" I would direct your attention to the Manual for Complex Litigation-Fourth Ed. by West Publishing.

     

    I assume that you do have familiarity with the concept of mass torts and how they have zero relation to the economic situation of the country.

  6. Fuuuuuuuuuuuck

     

    On the plus side the list of places worse than Gainesville is pretty small, but both Starkville and Lubbock are on it.

     

    Actually just go google Starkville right now.

     

    First thing I read "Realtors rushing to Dan Mullen's house"

    I assume that this is in response to news that Urban is quitting?

  7. Ron may not HAVE a cycle time. People don't stop getting injured in bad economies. That's the point: HIS practice may be fairly recession-proof. The question is what's happening with his adversaries.

    this is correct.

  8. Might make a difference whether you're talking about the plaintiffs' side or the defense.

    certainly this is true to an extent in that the plaintiff's side is completely unaffected by economic conditions. The reason why I would extend this to the defense side is that if we are still filing cases at the same volume, then they are still defending the same number of cases for which they can still bill, bill, bill. As for whether their clients, such as pharmaceutical companies, are now paying them a lower rate as the result of the recession I have no idea. But, the large firms here that do complex litigation have not laid off associates as we have seen with firms that handle more corporate and transactional work.

     

    again I ask Nathan, do you practice in complex litigation, or is this yet another example of you opining on topics based on things you've heard from others?

  9. New car has xm radio.. I hsve been playing the Grateful Dead Channel non stop.. Occasionally., I will take a break and listen to the Springstein Channel.. But, yeh, it's been a lot of Dead lately.. I prefer the 60's stuff with Pigpen.. They were a great blues band back then..

    My wife just got a car with satellite radio, and as soon as I get in I flip on the Dead channel. Drives her crazy because I sing along to every song, and I can't sing.

  10. Next time in Paris do yourself a favor and go to Le Duc. It's a somewhat expensive, very old school fish and seafood restaurant that serves some of the most perfect examples of the genre you'd find anywhere - sole meuniere, homard with orange butter, raw bass, sea urchins, oysters, everything just really extraordinarily good and the service is just fine.

    Agree completely. This is a favorite that is very close to where we stay in the 14th. Lunch is a good deal.

  11. They would certainly have problems if they poisoned a houseful of diners, but individual cases of food poisoning are hard to pin on a specific source (or indeed sauce).

    The duty owed to a social guest is very different than that owed to a business invitee. Another issue is insurance. Out here in the Middle, those who own homes have homeowners policies that cover a remarkable variety of liability claims, even ones that do not happen on the premises. For NY'ers who rent and have a renter's policy, I don't know, but doubt, that it would provide coverage for accidental poisoning of dinner guests. However, if they are running a business that was not disclosed to the carrier there is probably an exclusion that voids the coverage.

     

    If these are private, invitation-only type affairs, then what right does the city have to inspect?

  12. Joey, did ya ever hang around a gymnasium?~

     

    Joey, do you like movies about gladiators?~

     

    Joey, have you ever been in a Turkish prison?~

     

    Have you ever seen a grown man naked?~

     

    :lol:

  13. A wee bit of tripe and strozzapreti, elegantly paired with the crunch of herbed bread crumbs and some sweet tomatoes from San Marzano, goes for $28.

     

    That is ridiculous.

  14. The problem with making rules is that once you start it's hard to know when to stop, and inevitably there are inconsistencies throughout. So, I can go to my market and buy a dozen raw oysters from warm Gulf waters and take the chance of getting something nasty in my intestines, but I cannot take the same risk with raw milk cheese. Make sense? Of course not. I do think that a sensible warning as Paul suggested would make sense in the case of cheese, but as Ori points out, the same would be ridiculous for things like fruits and vegetables.

  15. Has anyone else caught any of the Great Migrations by National Geographic ? It's narrated by Mr. Baldwin and highly recomended.

    It was on the other night and I purposely avoided it. These shows always have the obligatory "survival of the fittest" segment where a mother animal watches her deformed baby slowly die from malnutrition or get eaten by wolves while the producers of the show maintain a "professional detachment".

     

    I just can't take those scenes.

    There aren't many of those, in fact they have this great zebra segment where (yes the mother dies) and the father ditches his other girlfriends and comes to the rescue of the baby.

     

    alright, but if I cry you are in a big trouble!

  16. Has anyone else caught any of the Great Migrations by National Geographic ? It's narrated by Mr. Baldwin and highly recomended.

    It was on the other night and I purposely avoided it. These shows always have the obligatory "survival of the fittest" segment where a mother animal watches her deformed baby slowly die from malnutrition or get eaten by wolves while the producers of the show maintain a "professional detachment".

     

    I just can't take those scenes.

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