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plattetude

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Posts posted by plattetude

  1. My wife and I took a leisurely ferry ride up the East River to the new Mekelburg's for a low-key decadent birthday lunch yesterday (with a low-key decadent whiskey tasting at Kings County Distillery).

     

    The apple/butternut squash bisque with foie gras "Oreo" was orgasmic. The cracklin's "l'amuse" was pretty killer too, and the meatloaf -- how do you make a meatloaf sandwich that rich and decadent feel so light and airy?

     

    And that babka beer....

     

    Good stuff! GOOD STUFF!

  2.  

    Looks like they won't reopen until spring, 2019.

     

    Per their FB page:

     

    Remember those new coasters we talked about yesterday? The ones that say ‘Born in a hurricane, forged in a fire’? Well, we’re all staring hard at them today. One of the biggest consequences of the fire – and some new red tape and legal issues that have arisen – is, unfortunately, the extension. Or, more accurately, its opening date. We’ve been forced to postpone it until next Spring.

     

    Yeah, to be clear, they're open now. This references the expansion into the building next door.

  3. Kinda creepy.

     

    So, Rod Hull, an Australian comedian, made his name wielding a life-sized emu glove puppet. Called Emu.

     

    Again, no ventriloquism. Hilarity ensued when Rod would field a couple of questions from an interviewer, after which Emu would go berserk, gripping them by the neck with his beak and hurling them to the ground. Remembering the puppet wasn't real, you realised it was just Hull being strangely violent. Women got the treatment too.

     

    So he ended up with a kids show, surrounded by lots of little children (like Barney). Very disturbing.

     

    He died falling off a roof, trying to fix his TV aerial.

     

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qauIYjHPzss

    I remember him from The Hudson Brothers Razzle Dazzle Show back in the early 70s. That's a throwback all right.

  4. stillwater artisanal ales micro a citra focused pale ale - 4.9% abv, brewed at two roads in connecticut. stillwater has a pretty good track record with low abv beer, my favorite beer of theirs (not that the saisons they were supposed to stick to at first are bad) is yacht, a low abv hoppy lager that's the one of the two good "american style lagers" I've ever had. this is a pretty good session ipa, which is probably the beer style that has the lowest success rate in my experience. it tastes like slightly sweet citra with no bitterness, and there's some malt in the finish, which probably doesn't sound that exciting, but a lot of hoppy beer in this abv range tastes off to me in a way that this doesn't. some of their newer releases made me think that this might be closer to the new england style, which isn't really the case.

    I've been really happy with some of the Stillwater offerings -- they have a subtlety that's hard to find in this age of ever-more-extreme beers. Almost grabbed a 4-pack of Micro yesterday (and also considered grabbing The Cloud, which seems like it might be a pleasantly quaffable "Imperial IPA" -- have you tried that?).

  5. I wrote a paper about colorizing back in my college days, when Ted Turner started doing it like crazy. The one positive thing that came of the the colorizing process was that they'd have to create a fresh and pristine black and white print to start from, so it was ultimately a huge benefit in restoring films that were otherwise languishing.

     

    But yeah, the end goal? Gross.

  6. A rare, forbidden splash of grapefruit juice in discouraged mixed drinks hasn't killed me yet. Might grapefruit liqueur cross a line?

     

    I gave up grapefruit long ago when I started taking Lipitor/atorvastatin. I miss it terribly. But statins have been great for lowering my blood cholesterol.

     

    I also now drink only socially, after years of daily cocktails or wine hammered my liver too hard. I'm annoyed that my tolerance and alcohol-trivia knowledge has dropped. But having more energy has been a bonus. In two years I've had great liver-panel tests, have lost thirty pounds, and can work out much more, all without sacrificing the delicious fatty foods that make those statins so helpful.

     

    Today, the kind host of a party happening next week has asked if I can have pamplemousse liqueur. But I find no gastroenterologist-mixologists writing online about whether that has more, less, or equal furanocoumarins than the juice itself. Any ideas?

    I can't speak to the questions on grapefruit/pamplemousse liqueur impact on your GI stuff, but I can offer this: Campari+lime can emulate grapefruit quite nicely. In fact, I doctored up a variation on a Hemingway daiquiri (which I dubbed "Hemingway Mocquiri") that takes advantage of that substitution for those times you want a grapefruit hit but don't (or can't) have grapefruit around:

     

    2 oz white rum

    1 oz fresh lime

    1/4 oz Campari

    1/4 oz Maraschino liqueur

    • Like 1

    Gigs

    I think I ruined a few people's evenings by telling them I last saw her 27 years ago.

     

    Truly, "All I Wanna Do" is a really interesting song, from the Talking Heads intro. She's playing a new song now which isn't as good.

    24 years ago, I saw her open for Crowded House on the "Together Alone" tour at Roseland. She memorably did a bit about her stint with Michael Jackson.

  7.  

     

    What...what is this? :o

     

    a very specialized, micro-regional food product. Likely unknown beyond a 25 square mile area from South Orange to Madison, right along the railroad

     

    It was known in Trenton, too, 60 years ago.

     

    I saw this style of sloppy joe on a lot of lunch menus in Center City Philly back when (early/mid '90s). Not sure if it's still a thing there, but seemed like it was part of the local food culture back then.

  8. I went to the theater once with some uneaten White Castle burgers in my pocket. Think I got away with it.

    Is that where Pete Wells got the idea for his Shake Shack review?

  9. I'll give a muted shout-out to Rum House, run by the Ward III team. It's certainly got more cred in the cocktail list than you'd expect given the vibe and location. Bonus, since it's attached to the Edison, it's open through the afternoon and into the evening. It does certainly get a mixed crowd that's not as cocktail savvy as the proffer could support.

     

    (The rum-based Negroni Leoni, with a hit of mezcal, is pretty fantastic.)

    • Like 1
  10. OK, so here's a question: what classical composer wrote the biggest pop hit? (It isn't Bernstein.)

     

    NOTE: I don't mean something like a Bach or Beethoven piece being turned into a pop song; I mean a song written as a pop song by the composer.

    This has gone unanswered. Hmm. Calling it a "pop hit" implies relatively recent provenance? Like, post-60s?

  11. Okay, I'll bite. I like Sweeney Todd because it walks a fine line between (errr, among) viscerality, pathos, and humor in both the book and the score. And the score is richly thematic and powerful, with plenty of earworms if you listen to it enough. (As with all music; anything can be an earworm if you listen to it enough.) Johanna? Check. Pretty Women? Check. Not While I'm Around? Check. A Little Priest? Check.

     

    The score offers knowing winks to music geeks like the "swing your razor wide, Sweeney" line taken from the Dies Irae. The score veers from Bernard Herrmann stridence and chills to lush, romantic paeans to, you know, razors to music hall jokery, yet still coheres.

     

    And the orchestrations. THE ORCHESTRATIONS. Brilliant brass choirs, contrapuntal vocal lines, breathless string arpeggios (okay, strings don't breathe, right).

     

    True, it's no Starlite Express, but then, what is?

  12. I do count eight from My Fair Lady, seven or eight from West Side Story. But there's nothing in My Fair Lady to touch "America" or "Tonight."

     

    West Side Story, of course, is bad Sondheim. Which means bad Sondheim is better than the best of all but half a dozen other Broadway lyricists.

     

    Not to mention it was his first Broadway show, at age, what, 25? Plus a lot of the more suspect lyrics were actually Bernstein's, but Bernstein didn't want to deprive Sondheim of a solo lyricist credit on his first big show.

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