Jump to content

oakapple

Members
  • Content Count

    9,316
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by oakapple

  1. You are also in the enviable position of being able to experience the real thing with some frequency.
  2. oakapple

    Picholine

    One thing I like about Lincoln is that you can order just one or two dishes, so it feels like less of a commitment than Picholine.
  3. oakapple

    Burgers in NY

    Grub Street has an interview, "What Can a Burger Teach Us About Creativity?" To those who believe the burger was perfected ages ago, and shouldn't change, I suppose the answer would be: nothing.
  4. Unless he's suddenly been seized by a fit of generosity, Stulman always had some of the worst wine mark-ups in the city. He made Chevalier's cocktails look under-priced.
  5. Stulman long ago became king, queen, and prince of the self-serving justification, but this one takes the cake:
  6. oakapple

    Louro

    All I'm saying is it's atypical, and therefore, we probably do not have the full story. Practically no one closes on a Thursday in June because their rent is going up in August.
  7. I disliked Marta for this very reason. I shouldn't be looking at rolling luggage unless I'm eating in an airport lounge. No one brings luggage into Chevalier. But anyhow, that would be a pretty lame reason to avoid a restaurant you'd otherwise be eager to frequent. In Per Se's early days, there were a few people who said they'd never go because it's in a shopping mall. I thought that was a pretty sorry excuse for a reason — assuming you were otherwise interested.
  8. You can bring up the easy point that Chevalier is in a horrible hotel, but that's not quite as true for Cafe Boulud or The Modern. Chevalier has its own street entrance. You never have to see the hotel. But on the off-chance that you entered through the hotel lobby first, I can't imagine what you'd see that would strike you as horrible. (The much-maligned lounge, which attracts a completely different clientele, is on a different foor.) That sort of question doesn't have a normative answer. I mean, there are people who have Daniel in their "regular rotation", and there are many
  9. oakapple

    Louro

    Leases are usually for a particular number of calendar months or years, so closing on Thursday, the 4th of June, is a bit unusual. once you know you are closing and liquidating, and if you aren't generating a ton of cash, you might as well close once the decision is made. Yes, but restaurants that announce they're closing usually see an uptick in business, from regulars who want one last visit, and the weekends are the most lucrative days. It is pretty unusual for a restaurant to close on a Thursday. ETA: The closing announcement for Ouest, just announced, is more like what yo
  10. oakapple

    Rebelle

    It's a figure of speech.
  11. oakapple

    Louro

    Leases are usually for a particular number of calendar months or years, so closing on Thursday, the 4th of June, is a bit unusual.
  12. oakapple

    Rebelle

    If he has, he's been remarkably quiet about it.
  13. oakapple

    Rebelle

    Oh, I totally agree. There are plenty of excellent restaurants that have become check-off-the-box-so-you-can-say-you've-done-it restaurants. Many of the S. Pellegrino places get most of their revenue from that type of guest. (Not that Chevalier is in Noma's class.) I think Sneakeater was saying that he wished there was a place with Chevalier's food that he could add to his rotation.
  14. oakapple

    Rebelle

    This was obviously a rogue server. I cannot imagine the whole staff has been trained to do this. I liked it better than Pearl & Ash.
  15. oakapple

    Rebelle

    We had dinner here last night. I certainly see the relevance of the comparison to Chevalier. The food here is not on as high a level, but it's plenty enjoyable. And this is a restaurant you could realistically put in your "regular rotation", whereas it's harder to imagine doing that at Chevalier, for a number of reasons. Capiello had a very drinkable 2000 Bordeaux on the list for $59, and how many places have that? Our server quickly earned the nickname "Johnny Upsell". Has Jeffrey Chodorow's son gone into the service industry? He even looked a bit like a young Chodorow. The menu h
  16. Hungry City is the successor to $25 & Under. To the best of my recollection, that feature never migrated to the blog and was never discontinued. There was a while (post-Meehan) that it was jobbed out to a variety of freelancers, before Ligaya won it full-time.
  17. That piece describes the change mostly as a re-organization of the way the information was presented (i.e., moving it to the more-frequently visited section pages). But in a lot of cases, and this includes Diner's Journal, the Times simply discontinued the coverage. Of course, I do realize that traditional newspapers are struggling. We don't have a Constitutional right to any more food / restaurant coverage than the paper feels it can profitably provide.
  18. And at the risk of sounding like a broken record..... The weekly norm for the NYT used to be two starred reviews per week, as it was until Ruth Reichl took over for Bryan Miller. Reichl stopped doing this altogether. Bruni revived the double-review, but filed them only occasionally. Sifton and Wells have done likewise.
  19. When Bruni started, he posted a review a week, plus a Diner's Journal every week, plus a Critic's Notebook every quarter. He didn't take a week off from reviewing when he posted one of the latter. The Diner's Journal moved to the blog about two years into Bruni's tenure, but he still used the blog in a very similar way, and with a very similar frequency, as the printed DJ used to be. Over the course of his tenure, his use of the blog gradually subsided. Sifton stopped using it almost entirely, and the blog was eventually discontinued as part of a broader purge of unprofitable NYT blogs.
  20. No review posted. I sympathize with the poor guy. He clearly put a ton of effort into that article. Such back-breaking work.
  21. oakapple

    Burgers in NY

    As I said upthread, the magazine exists to be read. Most of us have read at least a portion of it. Mission accomplished. The S. Pellegrino Top 50 list (announced yesterday) is a very similar idea — fifty being just a nice round number. I've never been able to comprehend where Eater got the number 38. Anyhow, even they do not claim that it's the 38 most essential restaurants. In fact, the NY list deliberately excludes all of the four-stars and others in that price range—and not because they consider them inessential. I do think you could make such a list in almost every city worth talki
  22. oakapple

    Burgers in NY

    This. I'm just not buying into the notion of an "important" burger. A "very good" burger? Sure. In the law, an "important" appellate decision is a decision that is cited within many others. Given the amount of references to it, the DB Burger meets that test, and there are a few others on the list that do. Obviously, once you get beyond the top handful, it's just a list of interesting burgers to consider, if you're the sort who really likes burgers.
  23. oakapple

    Burgers in NY

    NYM is particularly addicted to the listicle format — and not just for food. And their food coverage doesn't just do it for burgers. They have multiple issues a year like this.
  24. oakapple

    Burgers in NY

    It's funny. I've known a number of people who've tried that burger. They do it once and never have another. Sort of like kissing the Blarney Stone. You do it so you can tell people you did it. I've had it twice and probably will again. It's a repeatable treat, at least for some. So are the ones at Spotted Pig and Minetta (all IMHO). By the way, there are plenty of culinary destinations that people only do once. Practically the entire S. Pellegrino list is like that, for many of the people who visit those places.
×
×
  • Create New...