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oakapple

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Everything posted by oakapple

  1. oakapple

    Dovetail

    Of course, by the same argument Gordon Ramsay and Gilt shouldn't have the same rating as Little Owl, either. Not to tout my own rating system, but I use half-stars for that—and I gave Dovetail 2½. It basically means, "I would have given three stars, but for...." Your comment, though, reminds me of what some people said after Bruni gave two stars to Sripraphai: that people would go there expecting a "two-star experience," and would be disappointed. I am still waiting to read even one account of someone to whom that actually happened. But I agree, Dovetail misses out on many of th
  2. oakapple

    Dovetail

    My views (report here) are similar to Wilfrid's, though I don't think there was an UWS grading curve here—especially given that three critics independently arrived at the identical verdict. I thought that the food was in the expected range for a NYT three-star restaurant. If the identical dishes were served at Café Boulud or Veritas, I wouldn't be disappointed. (Craft and Bouley are a little harder to compare, because the style at those places is so fundamentally different.) But the ambiance and service are way, way below what you'd expect at a three-star restaurant. As I noted in my
  3. I haven't dined at Milos, but if you like that kind of food, my favorite is Thalassa in TriBeCa. No one would call it inexpensive, but I don't think it's over-priced, and I've never had a bad meal there.
  4. oakapple

    Momofuku Ko

    The thing I'm wondering is: when does the site "roll over" to the next day? Midnight would be sensible and civilized. Three a.m. (the same time as that red phone rings in the White House) would be dirty pool. Random times would be diabolical.
  5. oakapple

    Momofuku Ko

    Apparently the site, http://reservations.momofuku.com/, was briefly available. A number of people registered and made "reservations," believing (or perhaps hoping against hope) that they really counted. It was only a beta test. At some point, presumably within the next day or so, the Momofuku team will erase all the test data and open it up for real.
  6. You'd be surprised how infrequently I get turned away from the bar at Picholine. What's even funnier, the first time I went to Bar Boulud, it was because I was turned away at Josephina. I've never gone to Picholine for the bar menu, but my sense is that it's an extremely small space. Bar Boulud appears to be carrying the prices of a two-star restaurant, which in this town ain't cheap anymore, not counting the homely neighborhood places that have gotten a bonus star from Mr. Bruni.
  7. I don't think it will be quite so packed after the pre-opening excitement dies down. But the fact is, in that neighborhood, you're taking your chances just about anywhere if you don't have a reservation. I can't tell whether reviewers came in expecting a Daniel/Café Boulud type of experience. No restaurant should have to apologize for offering simpler pleasures, as long as it's priced appropriately. If you believe Frank Bruni, then that's what most people want these days anyway.
  8. Not true. Hudson Square was what that area was called before the tunnel entrance sort of destroyed it as a neighborhood. By the way, a number of Manhattan neighborhood names are inventions of the real estate industry. I am pretty sure TriBeCa was one of these. At one time, it was called the "Lower West Side," which made it sound like the then-seedy Lower East Side; hence, the new name.
  9. I probably didn't express myself clearly enough. I'm not suggesting that Bruni's DJ posts are print articles that got spiked. What I'm saying is that the DJ is an outgrowth of his print beat. It doesn't have—and it could never have—an existence independent of his main job, which is to write restaurant criticism for the Wednesday food section. Quite a few of his blog posts have explicitly said, "Here's a bit more about X that I didn't have room for in the newspaper." Admittedly, his blog posts sometimes have a breezier style than the print medium would allow, though not by much. A lot of B
  10. The Times "Caucus" blog is like all of the paper's blogs, including Diner's Journal: an extension of the hard-copy newspaper that allows them to include more material than they had room for in print. There are some substantial politics blogs that happen to have a mainstream media publisher, but have more of a resemblance to traditional blogging. Andrew Sullivan is the leading example. His blog has moved around at various times, but it has always been his voice, and clearly separate from anything his publisher du jour puts out in hard copy. A Guardian article on politics bloggers might very wel
  11. A lot of traditional print outlets these days produce web-only content. A blog is a neutral description of what something is, and has nothing to do with who is paying for it. The difference, though, is that Grub Street reads like a blog, whereas Diner's Journal reads like it's the overflow for what the newspaper didn't see fit to print.
  12. You've lost me there. Grub Street and Diner's Journal don't have many similarities. Grub Street has a good 7-8 posts per day, and the guy writing it (Ozersky) doesn't appear in print. Ozersky also has the classic "irreverent blogger" personality down pat. In every way, he's a typical blogger, albeit sponsored by a traditional print magazine. At Diner's Journal, the average is less than one post per day, and many of those posts have both the rhythm and the tone of a newspaper article. Since Bruni and all of the other contributors also write for the newspaper, Diner's Journal has the feel o
  13. That location does indeed show up as "Tribeca" on some maps. Just how the British would put it.
  14. oakapple

    Terroir

    I was there last night too, during its first "packed" interval. I arrived at around 6:45 and left about an hour later. I don't think this is the kind of place where people will linger a long time, so even when it's crowded I suspect the bar seats will rotate fairly quickly. At least, that was my observation last night. The disadvantage of visiting on the first night is that service is sometimes just a bit dicombobulated. But the advantage is that the full chef/ownership team is there. With two other very fine restaurants in their portfolio, I can't imagine that Canora and Grieco will be a
  15. oakapple

    Elettaria

    I think you're seeing the demand for whatever happened to open 15 minutes ago.
  16. oakapple

    The Bruni Thread

    Well, Eater put out a $500 bounty, winnable by anyone could provide solid evidence for where Restaurant Liebrandt is going. Best evidence was the old Montrachet space, but I walk by there fairly regularly and have never seen any signs of activity since it closed.
  17. oakapple

    The Bruni Thread

    These are the key lines: I don't honestly believe that WD-50 just did something to cross the line from two stars to three. Wylie has always been Wylie. Maybe Frank finally gets it. Or maybe, by dumb luck, Wylie has just happened to land on a set of reliable creations that, for now, have captured Frank's fancy.
  18. oakapple

    The Bruni Thread

    I'm on the record with a three-star prediction, as well. His re-reviews usually come with a change of rating, and I just can't see him demoting it.
  19. oakapple

    The Bruni Thread

    I do too, but remember he has disliked these types of restaurants in the past. That's the riddle here. He has never had a good word to say about this type of food in New York, or pretty much anywhere else, except El Bulli. But a demotion almost always comes with a credible argument that the restaurant has slipped. It's hard to see how he would argue that, since Wylie is still in the kitchen every night, and he's still doing pretty much what he has always done. If he demotes it, the reasoning would amount to: "I like molecular gastronomy less than William Grimes did."
  20. Except for ADNY, it is quite possible that Frank Bruni has never dined at a Ducasse establishment either. The Daily News is not the sort of paper that's going to fund a trip to France for Danyelle. After a few weeks of almost acceptable prose, today she turned in one of her worst clunkers ever.
  21. oakapple

    Momofuku Ko

    This should be good. I'll bet that online system will have teething pains. And imagine the fun to be had watching innocent diners entering a half full place only to be turned away on the grounds that the empty seats will soon be occupied by phantom on line customers. I'm not quite sure why Chang would invent his own online reservation system, when systems already designed by others are available. He's a chef, not a computer programmer. I am sure there will be a credit card guarantee. When you have only 14 seats, you can't afford to have a party of 4 skip out on a reservation with no
  22. oakapple

    The Bruni Thread

    For the purposes of this article, he used a two-year horizon.
  23. oakapple

    The Bruni Thread

    You omitted one little point. The survey said that the NYT "slipped from first place in the 2003 survey to sixth". That's a far cry from Rich's claim that the paper isn't even in the top hundred.
  24. oakapple

    The Bruni Thread

    I guess that never happens to him in New York. I wonder why.
  25. oakapple

    The Bruni Thread

    The words "latest fiasco" should be reserved for situations that truly warrant them. The McCain article certainly qualifies. But in this article, the only complaints seem to be the use of the word "abreast" and a few too many first-person pronouns. It's fair to say that Bruni does cover the restaurant scene. He may not be the most insightful critic, but this article is a big step in the right direction. He should have done it a long time ago. He actually got out and saw what was going on in the rest of the country, and he did it without dining at a single Italian restaurant.
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