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oakapple

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Everything posted by oakapple

  1. This November 2015 piece in Eater discussed the changes, which were then a proposal. In a brief search, I could not discover whether the proposal either went into effect, or was successfully opposed, but I think we would've heard if a restaurant like Charlie Bird had to gut its wine list. The proposal, thinly veiled in the name of consumer protection, is really just a gambit on the part of commercial middlemen to limit the other sources a restaurant can buy from. The trouble is, a lot of wines you see on top lists are simply not available — or, not in meaningful quantities — from tradition
  2. That is about 40 minutes longer than I would offer to wait.
  3. Yes, it was. Cru's wine list was two books — one red, one white — each the size of a good sized city telephone directory. Was that law changed? I know it was under discussion; didn't know it happened. How sad. As if we really need the state to protect us from restaurants like Cru and Veritas.
  4. It depends, too, on what you consider "making it". Cru had a six-year run, which is better than average for a restaurant.
  5. The broad wine list available by the half-bottle is a very old idea, too. And there's a false dichotomy in his assumptions: If you're taking the financial leap to sample a skin-contract orange wine for the first time — perhaps a Fontanasanta Manzoni Bianco, a luscious cross between a pinot bianco and a riesling — do you want it paired with an avant-garde creation with foams and flowers? Or do you want it paired with a pork and onion pie at Pasquale Jones? I see. If I'm not at a pizzeria, then I must be at an avant-garde restaurant with foams and flowers.
  6. And, because I know you were dying to have this answered....
  7. Jody Williams and Rita Sodi are a talented couple, snagging three of the top five.
  8. NYM is back with another of their silly best-of lists. Today, it's Best West Village Restaurants: I Sodi Buvette The Spotted Pig Sushi Nakazawa Via Carota Wallsé Annisa High Street on Hudson Té Company Barbuto Frankie's 570 Spuntino Taïm Sevilla Joe's Pizza
  9. I agree that Eater doesn't have the NYT's space limitations. Nevertheless, they are still time-, money-, and stomach-constrained. They can only eat so much, and are granted far less of a budget than Pete Wells with which to do it. They also share the same ultimate objective as the NYT, which is to be read. Burgers that suck don't make for interesting reading, except perhaps from a cameo during the annual shitshow week. That is, unless someone famous puts out a burger that sucks. A burger fail by David Chang would be granted all the space it deserves—and more.
  10. It still strikes me as a totally post hoc analysis, bearing in mind that many others have covered approximately the same "beat" while sharing none of those views.
  11. If that were true, people would have been saying so, long before the dust-up of a couple months ago. As far as I can tell, the people at Eater who work with him on a regular basis, were shocked when they found out about his past. As others have noted, he is very much an Ozersky wanna-be (though not as good). No one ever suggested that Ozersky had comparable political leanings. We now know that Ozersky apparently was aware of Nick's past. I can only assume that Josh was satisfied that Nick was no longer pitching his tent with his old buds.
  12. How often do you read a zero-star NYT review, in relation to the number of zero-star restaurants that exist? Very rarely. And it's for the same reason. With the very limited time and space available, it makes no sense to call attention to those that suck. Almost always, when the NYT issues a zero-star review, it's a restaurant that is somehow newsworthy. Wells doesn't go traipsing through the boroughs, looking for lousy restaurants no one ever heard of. It works that way with burgers, too. I do think Chowhound was responsible for the fetishization of basic food. Having said that, b
  13. Ozersky didn't spring from the womb fully formed as the food writer he became. I remember when he was just posting on eGullet, like the rest of us. Right now, Solares writes at the level expected for Eater. Whether he will ever reach Ozersky's level...I don't know. Probably not, since most people don't. A lot of Ozersky's recommendations were awfully strange, and in some cases ethically compromised, but he was always at least entertaining and original.
  14. oakapple

    Roberta's

    I certainly agree that as soon a NY restaurant has any kind of success, the chef or team usually starts thinking about expansion. But I don't feel this explains the city's lack of extraordinary restaurants. There are (perhaps) some who think Blanca IS an extraordinary restaurant. It's a candidate, anyway. And Blanca only exists because Roberta's existed. I don't think anyone ever claimed the original Torrisi was "extraordinary", in the sense of the type of restaurant that is scarce in NYC. If you bought the Torrisi hype train — which I did not — it was the best $45 prix fixe in to
  15. oakapple

    Roberta's

    The full quote refers to: "a cross section of serious eaters, including Gucci- and Vuitton- trimmed uptowners, devotees from Queens and New Jersey who pull up in white Cadillacs and black Continentals, blue-jeaned artists and bearded bohemian types, union officials, politicians, judges, out-of-town buyers with showroom models and theater personalities." This isn't precisely the Roberta's crowd, but isn't just limited to Cadillacs from the suburbs, either. Odeon opened in 1983, Landmarc in 2004; both well after Sammy's.
  16. oakapple

    Roberta's

    A lot of Roberta's patronage comes from outside the neighborhood. Beyond those choosing to go elsewhere in Bushwick, are those choosing not to go to Bushwick at all. By the way, Sammy's Roumanian was once cool.
  17. I actually rather liked Quality Italian the one time I went. No, it's not Michelin Star dining, but I don't want that every day.
  18. I will be a little bit more charitable. Most people do not feel that they need to have "truly good food" at every meal out, and will allow their dining decision, at times, to be guided by other criteria. We had many versions of this discussion when Ssäm Bar was at its apex. You could recognize that Chang was doing great stuff, but still choose not to go there very much, because of the location, the lines to get in, the uncomfortable stools, etc., etc. People like us are highly atypical.
  19. I would be pretty happy to be offered a list like that.
  20. You know, there are a ton of restaurants in midtown that do quite well, but get zero foodie press. It isn't just out-of-towners patronizing them. I visit these restaurants sometimes, because I work in midtown, and they are convenient. It becomes quickly apparent from the bar conversation, that a lot of their clientele consists of people who work in the area.
  21. An odd thing just occurred to me. If you ask someone [familiar with the industry] to name NYC's most successful restaurateurs, the name Michael Stillman doesn't spring to mind. And yet, he has done rather well for himself.
  22. oakapple

    Juni

    It didn't feel in any sense "imported" to me. I could understand that complaint more about SHO, since Hergatt had no NY presence before it opened; the Setai was obviously an international chain; and the décor, as Platt put it, featured "the kind of random trinkets ­(Chinese calligraphy brushes, necklaces from Tibet) that you find in anonymous international-airport hotels in places like Singapore and Dubai." The flip-side of "out-of-place" is the tendency of all new restaurants to follow one of a handful of established models, which makes them "of-this-place," and usually not terribly inter
  23. oakapple

    Juni

    Thanks. I don't have much time to look at the board anymore, but the news about Juni made me think that there'd probably be an interesting discussion here.
  24. oakapple

    Juni

    That's what I meant by "stopped trying." It's the same reason why Laurent Tourondel went the steakhouse route. He'll install a menu that lesser talents can execute in his absence, and move onto the next consulting gig. It's not even remotely intended to represent his best work.
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