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oakapple

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Everything posted by oakapple

  1. Wilfrid feels, as I do, that the outing was proper. Others disagree. That's what open debate is about.
  2. Except that it's a well-nigh non-existent rule. The fact that some think it exists, does not make it exist. People believe in UFOs too. I assume the writer can live with nasty comments at the bottom of an article, if that's the hell you are referring to.
  3. I don't see how a blog is fundamentally different from its pre-Internet equivalents that have been around for centuries, such as anonymous newspapers and pamphlets. Every message board commenter decides how "anonymous" he wants to be. Sneakeater isn't anonymous at all in restaurants. But if I addressed him here by his real name (which I do know), I can assure you he would be extremely unhappy. He doesn't want his message board posts to return on an Internet search, if a client googles him. Others are more serious about readers not knowing who they are, which was why it seemed like
  4. What's different about the Internet, is that there are millions of people contributing to discussion boards with names like "taion" and "Sneakeater". There isn't really a pre-Internet equivalent of this phenomenon. I agree that there is a strong newly-minted norm that we don't expose these folks' identities. EVGrieve much more closely resembles any number of pre-Internet public figures who attempted (with varying success) to conceal their identities. He is no more entitled to the expectation of anonymity than anyone ever was.
  5. What I am saying, is that pseudonymity is not new to the Internet. There is a long history of people concealing their names so that they can take unpopular positions; there is also a long history of them being outed. If you make yourself a public figure on controversial issues, you have to assume that someone will try to discover your identity, and unless you have been very skillful about concealing it, they will probably succeed.
  6. Sorry....no, with extreme prejudice. Once he makes himself a public figure, he is not entitled to retain his anonymity. Others who favor his viewpoint might extend him that courtesy. There's no guarantee that everyone will — and in fact, it's probably for the best that someone decided it was time to challenge that. (Of course, had he not put his name into a publicly accessible database linked to his domain name, he might not have been discovered, but that's how it goes.)
  7. The Internet didn't invent the pseudonym. It's an ancient practice. When you make yourself a public figure, people are going to try to figure out who you are.
  8. "Doxxing" would be if I researched and disclosed the identity of taion, Sneakeater, mongo_jones, or someone like that. I don't think EVGrieve is entitled to the same level of privacy that they are.
  9. As the story noted, EVGrieve has itself frequently been responsible for "outing" people who'd apparently gone to some lengths not to be outed. I therefore think he had about the weakest conceivable case for arguing that anonymity is a standard Internet courtesy.
  10. oakapple

    Peter Luger

    Sammy's is buying them all. I doubt it, but in all seriousness, Luger used to purchase only strip loins, to which it added rib steaks a few years ago. That still leaves a lot of cow that has to go somewhere.
  11. oakapple

    Blanca

    Food left standing starts to degrade almost immediately. Even a cold dish that has been sitting out for 10–15 minutes isn't exactly what it was when first plated.
  12. oakapple

    Blanca

    People object because it's an alteration to the usual social compact. We have come to expect that restaurants will charge us only for what we were served; but that operas do not re-start to accommodate late patrons. It's the same reason why some people think it's terrible to have to pay in advance for a "ticket" to a restaurant, even though they'd gladly purchase a ticket to a concert. I like "counter-style" dining — my wife actually prefers it over old-skool fine dining — but there has been a real loss of service, compared to what the traditional high-end places do.
  13. oakapple

    Blanca

    Obviously, they erred in not telling you. But I tend to agree with Sneakeater, and unfortunately this is pretty much a constant with these counter-only places. If you arrive late, you can't make up the courses you missed; and you're still charged for them, because the restaurant can't do anything with the unused food.
  14. oakapple

    Blanca

    Pete Wells awards three stars, correcting an earlier two-star review that most people considered erroneous. (Due to a bug on the NYT website, the earlier review shows as three stars, but it definitely wasn't at the time.)
  15. I have heard about that. A white napkin can leave behind bits of lint that could be visible on a black outfit. There might not be many restaurants anymore that can accommodate such a request, but it's not unheard of.
  16. It's a little unclear – to me, at least – exactly what occurred. Elasser says: "I eventually agreed to answer some questions via email for the story, but only once I felt convinced that the outlet wasn't trying to out me. I was ultimately wrong." The words, I felt convinced that the outlet wasn't trying to out me, fall a little short of, They promised not to out me. The reporter says, "I didn’t want to publish a piece if it would hurt his personal life, or if he would shut the blog down as a result." And: "I wouldn’t write a story about who he was if it meant he’d stop publishing."
  17. Yes, and Grey Goose in one cocktail becomes Grey Goose in every cocktail. "Bonsoir" to one guest becomes "Bonsoir" to every guest.
  18. When Pete Wells reviewed it just three months ago, the magic trick was still in the repertory. ETA: I now see he was referring to a date quite a while ago, and not contemporaneous with the review.
  19. Not Orik, but.... I think the traditional four-stars — those that serve a 3- or 4-course prix-fixe — have a sizable number of regulars and quasi-regulars. Jean Georges isn't on the SP list at all, and it is generally full every night. It's not achieving that entirely with global gastro-tourists and "mom's 75th birthday" dinners. I do think Eleven Madison Park is now 80%+ a tourist and special-event restaurant. That $225 menu is too exhausting for anyone to be dropping in regularly to try it, even assuming they have no issue with the cost. (I do realize you can order à la carte at the b
  20. I'm with Wilfrid: I can't see why anyone would think that EVGrieve is entitled to anonymity. Others who apparently knew or suspected who he was, elected not to "out" him, which was their choice. But the information was there in plain sight (as Flock's piece describes). The EVGrieve website is currently privately registered, but in the past, the blogger had registered it under his own name. That little mistake was all it took to unmask him. Which shows it's really hard to be truly anonymous on the Internet, if someone is determined enough to find you.
  21. I think that if you had a dead-certain proposition for the next EMP, you could get the financing. The trouble is the low success rate of such endeavours.
  22. As far as I know, EMP was fairly static during Heffernan's 7-year tenure. It had two NYT stars and was not on track for any level of Michelin. I can very well imagine that Danny Meyer had to be dragged kicking and screaming every step of the way --- although, to his credit, he ultimately agreed.
  23. oakapple

    Peter Luger

    This is an interesting point. On any given day, there could be two dozen places in NYC with steaks better than Luger's average, but predicting where those steaks will be is a crapshoot.
  24. Well, my hypothesis is quite simply that no one can open EMP or Le Bernardin today. What backs me up, is that no one has opened a "restaurant like that" successfully in NYC in the last 5–7 years, aside from a few cases of chef brand extensions, and there aren't even very many of those. So the odds of Chevalier succeeding were always going to be low, even if all the purportedly obnoxious social signifiers weren't there. Indeed, as I understand you, they were doomed before the restaurant even opened, because the hotel called itself "Baccarat". EMP, for now the 15th time, did not open as
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