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Heritage Apple Varieties


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Cummins Nursery (Geneva NY) has a wide selection of heritage apple offers for those who are interested in starting their own orchards. The grower's stock was seriously impacted by the exceptional cold of the winter 2005-2006, which reduced budding stock. Cummins also offers pear and several cherry types.

 

Cummins Site

 

Among the heritage varieties available are:

 

Edward VII on M.7

 

Ellison's Orange on G.16, M.9 and M.7

 

Elstar on M.7 (grafts) and G.16

Freyburg on G.30

Geeveston Fanny on G.16

Hardy Cumberland on M.7

Holiday on M.7

Laxton Superb on G.16, M.9 and MM.111

 

Another source for many kinds of berries is Here

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Another source for many kinds of berries is Here

I thought you were going to send a link to my house!

 

I'll admit that I have tasted many apples, and my favorite is still macintosh. Almost everything else tastes 'delicious' to me. NOT a fan.

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  • 7 months later...

I was about to start a new thread but then found this one. I love apples. I don't love baked goods featuring apples (except for a very flaky-crusted apple galette or similar) and I hate mealy apples even more than I hate liver, if that is possible. But a good crisp sweet and mildy sour apple is my idea of heaven.

 

Discovering new varieties. Elstars are wonderful to eat out of hand, as are Cox's Orange Pippins. I just bought some Boskoops, that are supposed to hold their shape well for baking. In the States I've had wonderful Jonagolds. I keep them in the fridge: they like the cold. I try to buy them from the person who grew them -- and more importantly from the current season. I've never had a truly great supermarket apple.

 

Elstars:

 

1400614501_f308167935.jpg

 

What are your favorites?

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I've been getting Honey Crisps that are terrific -- crisp, juicy, sweet and tart. Bought a small bag of Paula Reds a few weeks back; they turned wrinkly and dry before I'd gotten through half the bag. Went into the compost. :angry:

 

Oops...these aren't heritage varieties. Sorry.

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Bought a small bag of Paula Reds a few weeks back; they turned wrinkly and dry before I'd gotten through half the bag. Went into the compost. :angry:

I had that experience with Paula Reds this season too.

 

I have an apple tree in my back yard and this year for the first time since we moed in we actually had enough apples to make a pie--the apples are tart and tasty. The tree is old and in desperate need of a major pruning. We started doing dormant oil spraying in the winter, which has helped a lot. We have absolutely no idea what type it is. Anyone have any suggestions how we could find out?

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Fly, here in California one can contact the local Ag extension for identification. Might you have something similar up your way?

 

Edited to add link

 

Here is our Gravenstein apple, great for eating, baking, and sauce

 

P6270016.jpg

 

 

 

Here is the Cox's Orange Pippin, mostly for baking, but delicious eaten out of hand

 

P6270028.jpg

 

 

This year I made 19 quarts of apple sauce and froze bags portioned out for 15 apple crisps. I've never frozen them uncooked, so I'm not sure of the baked results. We bought the trees bare-root from an antique apple grower about 10 years ago.

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Do you have a university near you with an agriculture school? In the U.S. this would be part of one of the land-grant universities, like Cornell or Rutgers. I don't know what the equivalent would be in Canada, but I'm sure there is something similar. You could take a picture of your tree, a picture of a whole apple, another of the apple cut in half and a spray of leaves, send the photos to the pomology department and ask for help in identification.

 

There are also many websites with pictures of all kinds of apples. Just Google something like "apple varieties." Yours may be there.

 

(ed., Alexandra beat me to the post)

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It occurred to me after I pressed send that we have the nation's largest Experimental Farm not very far from where I live, not to mention the federal department of Agriculture headquarters. D'oh!

 

(When I was a kid and we drove past the local experimental farm, I always kept an eye peeled for three-headed cows...)

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