Jump to content

Truffles - what did I do wrong?


Recommended Posts

truffle paste is better than truffle oil which can be ghastly sometimes. the truffle peelings are ground with a porcini(i think..i could be wrong) mushroom paste and other good stuff.

 

balex, preserved truffles can be tasteless...use only the outerpeel...in all likelihood, it is summer truffles that had been preserved fortified with truffle oil etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 42
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

The question is whether they are always tasteless... these weren't summer truffles.

 

they shouldnt be....unless its a jar of preserved truffles that has been laying around for more than two-three days after opening it.

 

eta: i hope you didnt discard the juices..afterall, the truffle has been soaking in it as a method of preservation. ideally truffles need to be preserved in fat or alcohol. the fat is usually butter. but most whole preserved truffles are cooked as one piece and rest in the cooking stock. its a pity really...the best way to appreciate a truffle is to have it soon after it is unearthed..hence the appeal.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you get a chance see Chaplin's "Woman of Paris , a wonderful silent he directed (but not starred in) circa 1924. Wealthy Parisian playboy Adolphe Menjou orders black truffles cooked in champagne at a fancy "society" restaurant. There is a sign card that comes up describing the dish, along with actual tableside truffle cooking, all done with characteristic Chaplin humor. It's an interesting little side note in a film that also includes a scene in the same restaurant, but in the kitchen, with a full brigade of chefs cooking, a closet of hanging game, and the chef impugning the smell of the petty bourgeois who stink up his kitchen with their awful perfume.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all

 

Thanks again for your replies. Specifically:

 

- It wasn't a preseved truffle, it was 'fresh' (see picture)

 

- I have none left now, it was only a small truffle and I cut up the lot of it, but any bits and pieces I had left over I pushed into an opened bottle of truffle oil.

 

- I did slice them raw over warm pasta, and they didn't taste of anything. I suppose we'll never know if they would have tasted better cooked! However I do remember thinking they didn't give off much of an aroma while I was slicing. They were also quite crunchy, as some other posters have pointed out.

 

Still, you live and learn.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The question is whether they are always tasteless... these weren't summer truffles.

 

they shouldnt be....unless its a jar of preserved truffles that has been laying around for more than two-three days after opening it.

 

eta: i hope you didnt discard the juices..afterall, the truffle has been soaking in it as a method of preservation. ideally truffles need to be preserved in fat or alcohol. the fat is usually butter. but most whole preserved truffles are cooked as one piece and rest in the cooking stock. its a pity really...the best way to appreciate a truffle is to have it soon after it is unearthed..hence the appeal.

 

I would be interested to hear of any positive experiences people have had with store-bought preserved black truffles. If there is a good supply somewhere then I would like to know about it, as the three or four times I have bought jars of black truffles they have all been a very poor shadow of the real thing, thought the juice sometimes has a slight odour. The tasteless one I just had was from a Perigord company; I bought it in Harrods.

Any good brands out there? e.g. Fauchon?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I would be interested to hear of any positive experiences people have had with store-bought preserved black truffles. If there is a good supply somewhere then I would like to know about it, as the three or four times I have bought jars of black truffles they have all been a very poor shadow of the real thing, thought the juice sometimes has a slight odour. The tasteless one I just had was from a Perigord company; I bought it in Harrods.

Any good brands out there? e.g. Fauchon?

 

Fauchon anything hasn't been very good for a long time now, so I wouldn't trust them. I was given a small can of preserved truffles directly from the Pébeyre themselves. They said this was of really good quality, and coming from them I might just believe. I'll wait till I get back to the US and will try it and let you know.

 

Speaking of truffles, I got a great lesson, albeit accidental one, in distinguishing Brumale from Melanosporum yesterday, after the trip to the Lalbenque truffle market. We bought a tiny basket from one seller. We sniffed a couple of them, and they were wonderful, so we bought the lot.

 

Then, in the car as we drove back to Agen I was playing with the truffles. ...pick one up and sniff...ooh :) lovely...another one...ooh even lovelier....then the biggest one of the lot...hmm...this one doesn't smell like the others...not bad exactly..and quite strong too...but there was a certain something different about it....to my nose it was green-ish and herbaceous. I made note of it in my head but pretty much blamed it on different soil....probably the soil, I thought.

 

We got back, left the truffles in a covered jar with some eggs, and made a lunch the next day of two smallish truffles with omelette and a green salad. The truffles were small but the perfum filled the vast kitchen. They were gorgeous, tight, white-ish veins that seem to grow darker as they are exposed to air.

 

Then at dinner we decided to make a braised rabbit with truffles, from the recipe recited to us by Madame Delon, a legendary pig trainer and truffle hunter. We were invited to meet her pig, the latest in the long line of her Kikis, and for some prunes and a conversation with her at her house. The chat veered toward the biggest problem facing the truffle market in France in many years, the infestation of Brumales, an inferior but much heartier specie that's taking over the native Melanosporum. We talked about the difference in appearances and scents, and how difficult it was to distinguish them while covered in dirt.

 

All those stuff were all theoretical to me, until we peeled and cut open the biggest truffle in the lot we bought. The different in the perfum became quite distinct from the other ones we ate earlier. The veining completely different, wider, deeper white veins that stayed white long after exposed to air and even after cooking, the herbaceous nose growing even stronger after touching heat. It wasn't bad exactly, at least this one wasn't, but it was clearly different. And I'd never forget it.

 

Funny I don't feel like I've been cheated. This lesson is priceless -the kind of side by side comparison that I'd never get to do otherwise, and now I shall never forget. Priceless.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The disappointing truffle from Harrods was Pebeyre as well -- with that red and black label-- but it could have been one of the "Brumale" ones, though it did taste like regular black truffle, just not very strongly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny I don't feel like I've been cheated. This lesson is priceless -the kind of side by side comparison that I'd never get to do otherwise, and now I shall never forget. Priceless.

 

Truffle purchasing lesson #18,384 - always insist on taking them one by one, letting them stand on their own for a few and then sniffing them. Otherwise you're almost guaranteed to get 50% crap. (and this is when buying from good sources)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...