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Rail Paul

Bar Boulud - UWS

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(Ooops. Out of the countless times I've been to Picholine, I did go there ONCE without also going to Lincoln Center.)

 

(Sorry.)

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Your honor, I will present my case and I humbly demand that you return a verdict of tres guilty. I further ask the court for the commensurate, appropriate and fair sentencing of Death by the Elmer Fudd FUD-reducing Firing Squad.

 

Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt are the root of all evil! Whether it be in charcuterie or the anticipated lines to eat charcuterie.

 

Hear me out. Hear me out.

 

If you lived where I lived, oh wise and handsome judge, you too would agree that we must once and for all start eliminating these credibility-lacking, if not outright lying, pesky PeakEaters from within our neighborhood's midst. His deceitful, pernicious and perjurious Picholine purely-performance-related-peak-eating rebuttal, even if quickly revoked, does great injury to this court. It should clearly carry the gravest of consequences, considering my careful prior BeakEating qualification, which unambiguously referred to this piece of damning evidence:

 

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...t&p=1315273

 

as opposed to this piece of pre-opera doo-doo:

 

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...t&p=1179586

 

And if the defendant dares to mount an all duck defense, based upon this piece of thievery:

 

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...t&p=1179599

 

please allow me to add robbery to his high crimes.

 

Further, your honor, let me show you how he shamelessly wastes this court's precious time while simultaneously insulting your mathematical skills, by somehow thinking that the rules of division have recently changed. 2 divided by 2 still does not equal 0, at least the last time that I checked.

 

Well, since the only times I'd be eating at that spot are pre- or post-Lincoln Center, yeah.

 

I can also honestly tell you that half the (two) times I've gone to Kefi, it was in connection with a Lincoln Center performance.

He belches forth a bunch of hot air to actually incriminate himself by admitting that half of his two GreekEating episodes were LC-performance-free, which damningly conflicts with prior testimony quoted above. I am not sure about the precedent in this court, but elsewhere, such environmental recklessness would be grounds for yet additional charges in numerous Global Warming-panicked states.

 

In summary, your honor, and before you jump up on your bench and start screaming towards me, I close by saying that I sense that we are dealing with an incurable SneakEating rodent that must be shot dead, sacrificed, chopped to bits and served up as an example of American justice, if not French pate.

 

 

(Note. I took some liberties only because I sense that the SneakEater has a sense of humor and he is actually more like an AntEater with a very thick skin.)

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Okay, now that we're done with that nonsense, we can carry on.

 

I remember distinctly the first time that I had one of Gilles Verot's products. It was one of his "specialty pates".

 

I was invited to a small dinner gathering dans le seizieme. I was going to meet mon amie's best friends. Chez les best friends. A married couple. Each was descended from one of Napoleon's generals, if you can possibly believe. Le mari was a count, his older brother, a duke. It was towards the beginning of my time spent in Paris. Yes, I was excited to say the least. It was a bit daunting even. What did a little civilian like me have in common with those of the blood of Napoleon's warriors. But the level of nervousness didn't stop there. Because generals often enter the field of politics. And this count's ancestor, like Bonaparte before him, did just that and eventually led the government for a bit, as I learned on the ride over. It was becoming a bit too daunting. What did a little voter like me have in common with those of the blood who lead nations. What did an American like me have in common with the French aristocracy.

 

Quite a lot, it just so happens! as you shall see.

 

After notre arrivee, but well before the food entree, I was offered un peu de pate.

 

And I accepted. And I tasted, spreading some on a crunchy baguette, with the beady eyes of the count upon me. "Mmmm", I murmured in reasonably fluent French. Without asking permission, I picked up another piece of pain, spread un peu plus de pate sur ce pain and I tasted again. "Mmmmmmmmmmm", I murmured at any even higher volume with the squinting eyes of the count focused my way. I noticed that a eerie silence weighed in the high-ceilinged salon. He was waiting for a more elaborate response. Minding my manners, I chewed thoroughly and swallowed completely before offering up my verdict: "J'adore ce pate!"

 

The count's glaring immediately transformed into an enormous grin, he turned to mon amie and he offered up his verdict: "J'adore cet homme! Il a de bon gout comme toi, ma cherie. Nous avons tous de bon gout!"

 

The count raised his wine glass, warmly looked at me and continued: "Chambolle, serieusement, de mon coeur, bienvenue chez nous, et salut!"

 

I thanked him. I raised my glass. I tasted. Carefully, slowly, analytically. I swallowed. I waited. I responded boldly and loudly, sequentially pointing at the wine then the count: "J'adore ce vin! J'adore cet homme!"

 

Good food. Good wine. It binds us all.

 

Oh, that pate. It was a special pate de compagne, freshly made. It had a richness, a luxuriousness and a moistness that it highly unusual in such products. It had a strong meatiness that was complemented with a harmonious balance of herbs and spices. What the count served that day was more closely related to a pork-based, perfectly-seasoned steak tartare than a dry, solid hunk of pate de campagne often found in the states.

 

It remains to be seen how Verot's super fresh products will hold up when transported to this side of the Atlantic.

 

 

 

Finally, here is a very nice article about M. Gilles Verot (unfortunately it is in French) that discusses how he prepares his fromage de tete, lists some of his mouthwatering andouilles, terrines et rillettes and quickly comments on his concern about a French charcuterie crisis:

 

La charcuterie est aussi un art.

http://www.lesechos.fr/luxe/048/ser_048_028_01.htm

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Contrary to Eater, Gastropoda, the listing in Time Out, and the Daniel web-site, still not open to the public.

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I am increasingly glad that I don't give a crap about this place, or others of its ilk. It's quite liberating, actually. The premise of most of them is to create a premise that will allow lots of people to rationalize spending disproportionately large amounts of money on an experience that is worth about one-quarter of what it costs.

The last time I ate some legendary food that actually delivered on its reputation was about a year and a half ago at Jaleo in D.C., when one could get jamon iberico de belotta. Now that merits a special journey.

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The recording at their listed number says middle of January. I guess they are cutting themselves some slack.

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Schrambling spotted people partying in there the other night. I was very surprised at the phone message.

yeah, but through holes in papered windows -that's not open to the public yet. eater just posted "a correction"

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Nice, do you know if they deliver yet? :) Ordering some pate and eating it in my drawls would make my life a little better then it is..

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so it opened yesterday and we stopped by to try some charcuterie on the way to dinner. it was busy although not packed around 6pm. we only looked at the charcuterie menu (although a fellow bar diner's lamb navarin looked scrumptious). the service seemed lost and had quite a few issues to work out. it was rather slow, too - we sat down at 6 and the food finally appeared at 6:45 (they were serving a large table 12+ ppl - why on the first night?). the wine selection is limited for the opening. not clear when it will be expanded. the wines we tasted were fine but not particularly thrilling.

 

Fromage de Tête “Gilles Verot” - best of the charcuterie menu options as far as i can tell. all charcuterie plates come with a little frisee salad (garnish, really), a couple cornichons and pickled pearl onions. And lightly toasted bread - very good but it comes separately from the pates and the wait can be noticeable (they come from different sources - crazy idea)

 

 

Pâté Grand-mère - quite good

 

Pâté Grand-père - very good, my second favorite after the tete

 

Provençal pulled rabbit - fine but unimpressive, none of the complexity or richness of other dishes

 

Tourte de Gibiers Au Genièvre pheasant, duck and partridge “en croûte” with sweetbreads, foie gras and juniper -expected it to bebetter - all these parts did not add up to a greater sum

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