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Chodorow Addresses the Times

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comments on his blog are turning really nasty, i'd say deathwatch it now - nasty, nasty comments sprinkled with Chodorow dirt digging including things like this:

http://www.realitytvworld.com/news/restaur...istory-2500.php

 

i think that after some initial you-go-boy rah-rah stuff, he'll be rather surprised by the hate. Lidnsey Lohan's mom's kisses notwithstanding

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comments on his blog are turning really nasty, i'd say deathwatch it now - nasty, nasty comments sprinkled with Chodorow dirt digging including things like this:

http://www.realitytvworld.com/news/restaur...istory-2500.php

 

i think that after some initial you-go-boy rah-rah stuff, he'll be rather surprised by the hate. Lidnsey Lohan's mom's kisses notwithstanding

 

You really hate Chodorow don't you?

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The ad cost $83,916 per the NY Sun per the Times advertising dept.

 

That's 4 rounds of drinks for a party of 5 at the restaurant.

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comments on his blog are turning really nasty, i'd say deathwatch it now - nasty, nasty comments sprinkled with Chodorow dirt digging including things like this:

http://www.realitytvworld.com/news/restaur...istory-2500.php

 

i think that after some initial you-go-boy rah-rah stuff, he'll be rather surprised by the hate. Lidnsey Lohan's mom's kisses notwithstanding

 

You really hate Chodorow don't you?

 

not at all. he has no idea what he started (and how it's already coming to bite him, see above) - but that was true of The Restaurant as well

 

another trainwreck

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As a Brit I don't know the individuals or the restaurant involved but the Chodorow letter confuses the concept of a "critic" with that of a "reviewer". These terms are often used interchangeably when they are not the same things at all. One might reasonably expect a critic to have a specialist knowldege of the field. But a reviewer is any Joe Schmo, and the concept of the reviewer is designed to communicate the experience that any Joe Schmo walking into the restaurant, or the movie, or whatever, would receive.

 

So the first thing to ask is: are people who write reviews of restaurants for the media, reviewers or critics? And even if they can be said to be "restaurant critics", that doesn't make them "food critics".

 

This distinction might not matter much to the restrauteur on the receiving end of a scathing review, but claiming that the reviewer should somehow have knowledge of his field puts him on dodgy ground.

 

Where he might justifiably claim the high ground is in the fact that so many restaurant reviewers seem to have agendas that are nothing to do with the restaurant they are reviewing-at least it's the case in the UK. So many restaurant reviews blather on about the reviewer him/herself for two thirds of the review, and little vindictive prejudices and petty niggles come out in these ramblings. It's as if editors believe that writing about the restaurant alone is not entertaining enough for the readership, so they have to make the reviewer part of the story.

 

(BTW I speak as someone who reviewed restaurants for three years in the 70s for What's On in London magazine) :)

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Somewhere, Josh DeChellis is on his knees giving holy thanks that he pulled out of this trainwreck in time with his name intact. Perhaps the smartest, career-saving decision on the NY restaurant scene this year.

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Somewhere, Josh DeChellis is on his knees giving holy thanks that he pulled out of this trainwreck in time with his name intact. Perhaps the smartest, career-saving decision on the NY restaurant scene this year.

yup. he goes after big-name talent to add substance, chef/food credibility (which, of course, also helps with PR). if i were to be cynical about it, i'd say he pretty much buys the name and then does what he wants, which is probably why Josh left - not every chef is willing to put his/her name on something they didin't sign on fo. interestingly, it doesn't seem to work in NY but this model has been successful in other cities. the latest partnership is with Zak Pelaccio in London. will be i teresting to see how it develops.

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I may be in the minority here, but I have had some good meals at China Grill. The Szechuan beef marinated in sake, lamb spare ribs, bananas in a box, and a dessert that looked like a plate of sushi but was actually made of chocolate confections was very good.

 

That said... I've never had kobe or wagyu beef....but it just sounds kinda gross.

 

All you connoisseurs... Is kobe beef all that??

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Bananas in a box was quite good.

 

Kobe beef is very different from what we're used to in the US. Most people like it, but many do not. Although I wonder if American restaurants prepare it the way I had it in Japan.

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The food in London is vile: bad food, snooty service, grossly overpriced.

 

Don't say that in front of Tuckerman, he'll get pissed at you for not asking him for recs.

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