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My client has random drug testing and drug testing for cause (anyone involved in an 'incident') so perhaps I should do the same. The poppyseed haze was several years ago and I still think I would pass a slice of that cake now...drug testing or not.

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Steven, my sister developed what her doctor termed a 'sensitivity' to shellfish over time:lobster, oysters, clams etc.---she gets violently ill--it is scary, I almost took her to the emergency room one night in Amagansett.

 

I got some sort of food poisoning, not sure exactly what, at a very good and now closed restaurant in lower Manhattan. As did the one other person at my table who had the same salad I had. I have never been, and never hope to be again, so sick. I lost over 15 pounds which then I could ill afford to lose as for weeks I subsisted on tiny sips and bites of Gatorade, rice, boiled potatoes and bananas.

 

A friend who is a physician told me that if I had taken parasitology I would never eat another oyster. I ignore him and eat them all the time, but never uncooked Gulf oysters.

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There is a big difference between sensitivity (aka allergy) to certain foodstuffs and foodborne illness (aka food poisoning). When one has a sensitivity, the symptoms are generally different, as they are systemic -- breathing, heart rate, etc. -- rather than focussed on the digestive system, although GI may get involved as well. And yes, it is possible to develop sensitivities in later life that one did not have earlier. A colleague many years ago knew he was sensitive to shellfish -- but because we were in Baltimore, decided that he had to at least taste a crabcake at lunch. When at dinner the pasta appetizer was garnished with shrimp, he wisely asked the servers to leave them off -- but did not ask if there was any other form of shellfish in the dish. There was -- shrimp stock in the sauce -- and he spent the night in a local hospital. And about 10 years ago, I realized that I could not eat skin-on hazelnuts: I felt my throat starting to close, and I started to have trouble breathing. It finally helped me understand why I felt uncomfortable after eating walnuts: nut skins. Quite different, though, from when I ate bad seafood -- that was only an intestinal reaction.

 

The range of food sensitivities seems to be growing; that is the bane of chefs who are now asked to leave out the garlic, or the mushrooms, or whatever. We've talked about that on other threads. Even though some people :P claim sensitivity to get out of eating something they just don't like, it is a very real problem for others.

 

And then there are things like Crohn's disease; don't know much about that, but I think it doesn't matter what one eats -- bad reaction to anything. (Please correct me if I'm wrong.)

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Crohn's is an autoimmune disease where the immune system goes after your innards. It hardly matters what you eat, although I suppose some things are tougher than others. But ultimately it is a battle between the innards and the T-cells, without allergy or food involvement.

 

Your immune system is easily able to discriminate between clams and oysters, or oysters and lobsters, or not, just as it chooses. For reaction or overreaction.

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I got food poisoning from the meat-and-three at a strip mall in Kihei. I had to crawl to the toilet, and spent the better part of the rest of the night in there. I didn't eat a proper meal for two days, and YES, I would do it again: I lost five pounds overnight. :P

 

My last bout of FP came on the morning we were to head home from Mexico last year - dropped five pounds that day and the next few - since I've gained some of it back, it must be time for another trip to Mexico - and guess what, I'm leaving on Tuesday :D

 

Maybe I'm cycling - FPfree the first trip, then FP, now on the third trip, if I avoid FP, I'll be a happy traveler.

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One especially memorable bout of food poisoning set in as I boarded a crowded flight, center seat in coach, going from Bangkok to London. What a long trip that seemed; and fruitless to wonder which of the splendid dishes I'd eaten over the previous week caused it.

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Does anyone know if it is possible to build up a tolerance for the things that might sicken one? (not talking about allergies here, just foodborne baddies -- rather like the way the guy in a Lord Peter Wimsey built up an immunity to arsenic so that he could do in Harriet Vane's lover, iirc, and the way the same ruse backfired in Phyllic C. Richman's novel)

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Does anyone know if it is possible to build up a tolerance for the things that might sicken one? (not talking about allergies here, just foodborne baddies -- rather like the way the guy in a Lord Peter Wimsey built up an immunity to arsenic so that he could do in Harriet Vane's lover, iirc, and the way the same ruse backfired in Phyllic C. Richman's novel)

I believe mongo has said that Indians in India have greater tolerance for these things which they lose when they live in the west for long periods.

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Does anyone know if it is possible to build up a tolerance for the things that might sicken one? (not talking about allergies here, just foodborne baddies -- rather like the way the guy in a Lord Peter Wimsey built up an immunity to arsenic so that he could do in Harriet Vane's lover, iirc, and the way the same ruse backfired in Phyllic C. Richman's novel)

I believe mongo has said that Indians in India have greater tolerance for these things which they lose when they live in the west for long periods.

Isn't this the 'don't drink the local water' situation? People build tolerance for the bacteria in local drinking water, but tourists get rabid Montezuma's revenge?

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I would think that building up a tolerance to something would eventually lead to harm. At some point your body would have more than it could tolerate of the offensive product, right?

 

By the way, as an interesting sidenote, Beethoven had toxic levels of lead in his body when he died.

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I would think that building up a tolerance to something would eventually lead to harm. At some point your body would have more than it could tolerate of the offensive product, right?

Bacteria and viruses are destroyed by the immune system. Most toxins are metabolised and/or expelled by the liver. That's not true of heavy metals though, which is why mercury, lead, etc. are such a concern.

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One especially memorable bout of food poisoning set in as I boarded a crowded flight, center seat in coach, going from Bangkok to London. What a long trip that seemed; and fruitless to wonder which of the splendid dishes I'd eaten over the previous week caused it.

 

Ah, you've just sparked my memory of this summer in Tunisia: got hit by the diarrhea stick while on a louage (shared cab) ride between Sbeitla and Kairouan... That was a long trip. Fortunately I kept myself amused by trying to remember how to say "I'm going to explode" in French, and fantasizing about killing myself.

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