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I've never made it before. Inspired by this last trip and kalypso's description of her sausage maker visit, I thought why not?

 

I had two pounds of ground pork from Prather Ranch and all the rest of the ingredients from DK's Cuisines of Mexico:

 

1/2 tea coriander seeds

3 whole cloves

1/2 tea peppercorns

1/2 tea oregano

1/8 tea cumin seeds (oh please, I used a whole teaspoon)

 

grind in a spice grinder/mill with

 

7 toasted ancho chiles

 

Add to ground pork along with:

4 cloves crushed garlic

2 tablespoons sweet paprika (I used smoked Spanish)

2 1/2 tea salt

2/3 cup "strong" vinegar.

2 oz vodka (optional, I passed)

 

She has you grind 2 lbs pork tenderloin abd 1/2 pound park fat. I just used the ground pork and it was fine.

Mix with your hands and let "set" for three days, stirring daily. the put in casings.

 

I don't think I'll make it to the casings stage. <burp> The aging from just yesterday made a good difference.

 

I found a recipe for the Verde in The Art of Mexican Cooking and I think I'll try that next. Obviously this isn't a "keeper" type sausage but does it differ much from Italian or Spanish? Is this pretty typical for a Mexican recipe? What is it about sausages? I love them!

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2/3 cup "strong" vinegar.

 

 

This is way too vague. The type of vinegar, por favor. The vodka would kill microbes but so would tequila or mescal.

 

I find a lot of recipes in the Mexican kitchen call for light, fruity vinegar or rice vinegar if there's no homemade pineapple vinegar, for example. I assume strong would mean traditional apple. I ignored Miss Kennedy and used Vilux Pear and I'm not sad I did.

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I've never made it before. Inspired by this last trip and kalypso's description of her sausage maker visit, I thought why not?

 

Mexican recipe? What is it about sausages? I love them!

 

Oh...my...god...you are my hero :blink: (reverent genuflecting since there is no emoticon for that)

 

A couple of months ago I purchased the grinder attachment for my Kitchen Aid with the intention of making chorizo. I haven't yet managed to get 'round tuit. My inspiration came, not from my visit to the chorizo maker in Toluca, but from a local restaurantuer here in SD who makes his own because the commercial stuff is so awful. I was going to use the DK recipe from her last book. I guess now I have no excuses. BTW, Rick Bayless has a recipe on his web site Frontera Kitchens for a red chorizo that doesn't need to be aged, nor does it need to be put in casings.

 

What's so great about sausages? Pork fat, baby, pork fat.

 

Strong vinegar? Cider or distilled would fit the bill. I, however, think RGs choice was inspired. Pork and pears, what's not to love.

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Do you think one could water down apple cider vinegar to get a lower percentage? 'Coz apples and pork, too. :blink:

 

The recipe calls for a strong vinegar so straight cider would be fine.

 

kalypso, I couldn't find the recipe on his site. Maybe it's in one of his books as well. I don't think I really need to bother with casings. I don't think these would last very long in terms of freshness and I'm eating it. I was thinking I'd vacuum seal them and try "aging" in my vacuum sealer's marinade box.

 

Does DK's Verde recipe in Art look good? I'll check out her regular recipe in Kitchen tonight. It's such a good cause.

 

Tonight for dinner was several tacos with a spoonful of cooked chorizo, LOTS of chopped romaine and some dry goat cheese that's closer to parmasan than anything else. Then some salsa. Works for me!

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kalypso, I couldn't find the recipe on his site. Maybe it's in one of his books as well. I don't think I really need to bother with casings. I don't think these would last very long in terms of freshness and I'm eating it. I was thinking I'd vacuum seal them and try "aging" in my vacuum sealer's marinade box.

 

On RBs web site there is a feature called Ask Rick. Someone asked him for a chorizo recipe last year, which is when I saw it. IIRC, that particular feature is archived. If so, try sometime between 2/06 and 8/06. There is also a pretty good recipe for Toluca-style chorizo in his first cookbook Authetic Mexican

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We have made chorizo sausages using our Kitchen Aid, following a Bruce Aidells recipe:

 

291412417_dc7f2575b2.jpg

 

(That beer was for the cook, not the sausage)

 

291881279_721d766057.jpg

 

291881269_7303c1640e.jpg

 

I have no idea how authentic the recipe was, but it was very good!

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Fly, please tell us more about this chorizo. Is the texture firm? Does it melt, like much Mexican chorizo, or does it hold its shape? Could you grill it and expect it not to melt away? And do you remember what's in it?

 

The sausages are beautiful!

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The red from Mexican Kitchen is

 

2 lbs ground pork

8 oz pork fat

35 guajillo chiles

2 cups mild white vinegar

6 cloves garlic

2 mex bay leaves

4 sprigs fresh thyme

4 sprigs fresh marjoram

1 tea dried Mex oregano

10 peppercorns

6 whole cloves crushed

3 whole allspice

2 tea seasalt

7 feet pork casings

string or corn husks.

 

tHE CHILES soak in vinegar after they are softened. That sounds very good.

The ties are made with cut up corn husks. they look very cute!

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Fly, please tell us more about this chorizo. Is the texture firm? Does it melt, like much Mexican chorizo, or does it hold its shape? Could you grill it and expect it not to melt away? And do you remember what's in it?

 

The sausages are beautiful!

Why, thank you, ma'am!

 

We didn't grill them but I would expect they could have held their shape okay (it did crumble readily when uncased). We fried them, used them in paella and also crumbled with eggs. A friend made sausage gravy with them too. I just checked and it wasn't Bruce Aidells at all, it was from a Mexican cooking book from the California Culinary Academy. It called for ancho, pasilla and Japonés chiles, coriander, oregano, ground cloves, cumin, paprika, garlic, white wine vinegar, and of course pork butt and salt. It made 3 1/2 pounds or thereabouts. I could post the recipe if anyone wants.

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With the ground pork I had left, I mixed it with some pure chile powder (why, Rancho Gordo brand, of course!), ground cumin, coriander, Mexican oregano (why, Rancho Gordo brand, of course!) and clove, salt, lime and a shot of wodka for Rebecca. I vacuum sealed this in the marinder. It was good!

 

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Taco with the chorizo, refried beans (why, Rancho Gordo brand, of course!), romaine lettuce, spring onion slices, dry goat cheese and Rio Fuego (why, Rancho Gordo brand, of course!) sauce.

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