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I've got Moose meat...


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My dear ol' Dad in Maine won a moose ticket in lasts year's license lottery, and actually bagged himself a moose!

 

He sent me (frozen), Moose shoulder, sausage (which he says makes a nice spaghetti sauce), and some short ribs. This is some very dark, almost purple meat.

 

I'm planning on making a Bourguignon with the shoulder. There's a very nice (although laborious) preparation for Beef Bourg. from Fine Cooking mag, March 2000. It's time consuming, and very technique-heavy, but that's not my issue. I've made this before with beef and it was sublime. I don't mind a bit spending all weekend cooking one dish- I love that kind of cooking.

 

My question is this: Do you think that the moose with be helped or hurt by Bourguignon-ing it? I'm operating on the assumption that wine makes all things better. I've made Elk Osso Bucco that involves a long wine braise that turns out very well, but I've never had moose before (I'm assuming that long braising is going to be the key to real edibility).

 

I'll also be using some rendered duck fat to brown the cubed moose in, as it's very very lean.

 

Dad's suggestion was crockpot + water + french onion soup mix.... but he's not much of a cook. And I don't own a crockpot.

 

Other suggestions? Keep in mind that "send me some" is not a reasonable suggestion ;-P

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Braising is a great idea. Marination in wine + alliums also good. This is some funky stuff, and you'll want not to be too shy with the juniper, bay, garlic, and etc.

 

Good tips, SFJoe. The Beef Bourg recipe I have marinates the meat in wine and sliced raw onion overnight as step one. You addressed my primary concern- the funkiness, so I'll up the bay leaf and alliums. Thanks!

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My dear ol' Dad in Maine won a moose ticket in lasts year's license lottery, and actually bagged himself a moose!

 

He sent me (frozen), Moose shoulder, sausage (which he says makes a nice spaghetti sauce), and some short ribs. This is some very dark, almost purple meat.

 

I'm planning on making a Bourguignon with the shoulder. There's a very nice (although laborious) preparation for Beef Bourg. from Fine Cooking mag, March 2000. It's time consuming, and very technique-heavy, but that's not my issue. I've made this before with beef and it was sublime. I don't mind a bit spending all weekend cooking one dish- I love that kind of cooking.

 

My question is this: Do you think that the moose with be helped or hurt by Bourguignon-ing it? I'm operating on the assumption that wine makes all things better. I've made Elk Osso Bucco that involves a long wine braise that turns out very well, but I've never had moose before (I'm assuming that long braising is going to be the key to real edibility).

 

I'll also be using some rendered duck fat to brown the cubed moose in, as it's very very lean.

 

Dad's suggestion was crockpot + water + french onion soup mix.... but he's not much of a cook. And I don't own a crockpot.

 

Other suggestions? Keep in mind that "send me some" is not a reasonable suggestion ;-P

 

Get the ribs,,, Get the ribs..

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Because of how lean it is, I would consider looking around for daube recipes -- I cooked a Paula Wolfert wild boar daube recipe that literally took five days of cooking, cooling, re-heating, etc. Lengthy yes, but well worth it. It is basically a stew but the act of constant slow heating (in clay, of course) cooling and re-heating tenderizes the meat.

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Not according to any of the recipes I have, have seen, or have used. This from About.com:

 

Larousse Gastronomique defines daube as "a method of braising meat...in red-wine stock well seasoned with herbs."

 

In terms of technique, a traditional Boeuf Bourguignon follows the daube template pretty closely. I'd be happy to be corrected if I am in error.

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I've had moose balls.

 

There are fall “game suppers” all over Vermont during hunting season, usuaally held as fundraisers at fire houses and grange halls. I've been to one, which is about all I need. I was pretty taken aback when I was offered moose balls. Turns out they were simply meat balls made with ground moose meat.

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