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I think Mario's is a winner, and it is one of two I use. The other is that of Nan, mother of a high school friend and the best cook I have ever known. She minces garlic, cooks it very slowly in olive oil, adds tomatoes and salt. Adding chopped basil or parsley optional. That's it. The quality and freshness of the ingredients is of course paramount.

 

I think tomato sauce is one of those things where the fewer bells and whistles there are, the better.

 

You could just can tomatoes and make the sauce as needed, since it is made so quickly and easily.

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I've been using Mario's very basic and easy recipe

 

What does Mario do?

 

I like Marcella's very gentle and soothing tomato sauce with onion and butter, especially with gnocchi. You put 2 lbs. of peeled, seeded coarsely chopped tomatoes in a pan with 5 Tb. of butter, 1 onion, cut in half and some salt and let it cook for 45 minutes or so. Mash up the tomatoes as necessary and discard the onion before serving. The sauce can also be put through a strainer if you want a more refined texture.

 

Marcella notes that this sauce can be frozen.

 

(I see that this is very similar in character, if not flavor profile, to Nan's.)

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I'm with Daisy on simpler is better.

 

Hazan's recipe is good.

 

2lb fresh toms / 2 cups canned

Whole peeled onion

5T butter

Salt to taste

 

Simmer till fat seperates. Remove onion.

 

I also strain it because I don't like seeds.

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Eyebrows makes wonderful tomato sauce every year, and we freeze it in plastic containers. He puts in onion, garlic, carrots, celery, fresh herbs, tomatoes....and a bit of hot pepper. He sautees the vegetables in olive oil before adding the herbs and tomatoes. He leaves it a bit chunky and is adamant about not cooking it too too long. He cooks it a bit more after the defrost. Mighty good on a winter's evening.

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Just an aside, but you probably know: if you are planning on canning tomato sauce or tomatoes, you need to ensure it is acidic enough; if not you will need to pressure can. Check for recipes in the Ball Blue Book or something similar.

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Just an aside, but you probably know: if you are planning on canning tomato sauce or tomatoes, you need to ensure it is acidic enough; if not you will need to pressure can. Check for recipes in the Ball Blue Book or something similar.

Ay. No, I didn't know that. How do I ensure that it is acidic enough?

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I've been using Mario's very basic and easy recipe

 

What does Mario do?

From my rusty memory:

 

Grate a carrot. Hand squeeze a couple cans of tomatoes. Add thyme, onion (?) and maybe garlic. Lots of olive oil of course.

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I love celery, but not in my tomato sauce. Mario's version is a very little diced onion and grated carrot, a little minced garlic, sweated in olive oil, tomatoes and a little salt added, cooked for about a half hour.

 

Edit: cross-posted with Abby

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Just an aside, but you probably know: if you are planning on canning tomato sauce or tomatoes, you need to ensure it is acidic enough; if not you will need to pressure can. Check for recipes in the Ball Blue Book or something similar.
Ay. No, I didn't know that. How do I ensure that it is acidic enough?

Add some vinegar or lemon juice. It can either be in the recipe or added to the jar before filling. It doesn't really take a lot, since some tomatoes are quite acidic on their own, but many are not so it is safer to add some.

 

Edited to add: check this out: http://www.freshpreserving.com/pages/tomat....php?type_id=30

 

Another recipe

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It is better I think to store a tomato puree with no fat in it, very plain. Then when you make the sauce you do the garlic and olive oil or onion and butter, or onion and pancetta etc. It is slightly less convenient, but I think the flavour is better and it is more flexible.

 

It also hugely depends on the type of tomato: how much juice they have.

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I roast my tomatoes first. Halve the tomatoes and lay them on a roasting sheet. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, fresh thyme if you have it, olive oil. Roast at 425 for 25-35 minutes, til they give up some liquid.

Towards the end of the roasting time, saute garlic, onion and rosemary (or herb of your choice if you got it) in olive oil in a large pot. Add the roasted tomatoes. (If you like, and I do, deglaze the roasting pan). The tomato skins will soon separate from the flesh and you can remove them with tongs. Simmer another hour or so.

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