Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Peter Creasey

Scrambled Eggs

Recommended Posts

Slow for scrambling, fast for omelets.

<_< Did Thunk start this? Al foil hat time. Oh, it was Peter! Been pondering this topic for three days. I picked up a special little Nordic Ware pancake pan at the museum flea market on Saturday and thought it might be useful for eggs, too. Looked up eggs in my Larousse Gastronomique. It says to cook omelets at high heat in a pan never used for anything else but omelets and fold it. Cook scrambled eggs at low heat and stirring constantly. And we've already discussed elsewhere water vs cream.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i played around with scrambled eggs quite a bit when i was writing "french fry." my favorite technique--and one i still use all the time--is to start the eggs over medium-low heat in a little bit of butter and then, when the eggs start to come together, start feeding in cubes of cold butter. this moderates the temperature so they don't overcook and it also forms an emulsion so the eggs are really creamy. personally, i don't like to add either cream of water to scrambled eggs. i find cream makes the eggs stick and masks the flavor. water is just "why bother." proper technique is the key to creamy eggs, not extra ingredients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i played around with scrambled eggs quite a bit when i was writing "french fry." my favorite technique--and one i still use all the time--is to start the eggs over medium-low heat in a little bit of butter and then, when the eggs start to come together, start feeding in cubes of cold butter. this moderates the temperature so they don't overcook and it also forms an emulsion so the eggs are really creamy. personally, i don't like to add either cream of water to scrambled eggs. i find cream makes the eggs stick and masks the flavor. water is just "why bother." proper technique is the key to creamy eggs, not extra ingredients.

 

Have you ever tried the technique where you just finish with a tablespoonful of heavy cream?

 

It really is a completely different thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
iwater is just "why bother."

The water is to add a bit of steam to an omelet, which is not stirred and pointless or rubberizes in scrambled eggs. Thanks for your input on this with the added cold butter. Will try that. Funny, to wax philosophical, how the simplest foods conjure complex techniques. The LG also brought back the subject of shirred eggs. Guess these went out of style when we stopped having scullery maids to scrub the cooking pots. Have not exprerimented with shirred or poached including flavors, chopped things like Jalapenos in the whites as they cook.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Save a bit of the raw beaten egg with some cream in it and mix this in just before removing the eggs from the pan. Makes them even creamier.

The goal is to have tiny curds of egg in a custard-like consistency. Only low heat will and frequent stirring will produce that result.

Creme Fraiche will work nicely stirred into the eggs shortly before they are "done."

 

No, I did not start this thread this time. I started several like it over the years, but that's the deal when you are an old-timer--been there, done that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Be sure to caramelize your morels thoroughly before you add the eggs, too.

 

and no shallot <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
iwater is just "why bother."

The water is to add a bit of steam to an omelet, which is not stirred and pointless or rubberizes in scrambled eggs...

But an egg already has so much water why do you need to add more for steam? Egg whites are ~90% water, so adding more water does nothing but dilute the flavor. Is there a cooking myths thread? I think the add water to eggs for steam needs to be in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got so hungry reading this thread. Scrambled two eggs, no added liquid, cooked at medium speed in a teflon-y wok, added a ripe tomato and some parsley and chives just before finishing. Grainy toast, strong tea. Perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But an egg already has so much water why do you need to add more for steam? Egg whites are ~90% water, so adding more water does nothing but dilute the flavor. Is there a cooking myths thread? I think the add water to eggs for steam needs to be in it.

 

Adding water makes omelettes fluffier. If you like them fluffy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Slow is the way to go. Fast is just a broken omelet.

 

snip

Well, I like big curds, so I guess that means I like a broken omelet. <_< All that constant stirring over low heat makes them too much like a too-thick custard sauce for me.

 

Relatively fast, but over heat no higher than medium-high, otherwise the bottom browns (aka burns): Beat eggs (Plus water sometimes; plus milk sometimes; plus no liquid sometimes. Always plus salt [adding it to the cooked egg doesn't give the dispersion I prefer]. Sometimes plus pepper. Sometimes mixed with a fork; sometimes with a rotary egg beater). Melt butter in pan. Pour in eggs. Let cook until bottom sets a little. Stir and turn over big curds. Remove from heat when still glistening. Eat.

 

Sometimes I mix in cottage cheese when I beat the eggs. Or I melt it in the pan before I add the eggs. Rye toast is best for sopping up the whey that leaches out. What can I say? A childhood dish that I refuse to give up. ;) Actually, soft goat cheese works well, too, but only beaten in first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To add further dilema, which eggs are best?

 

I love duck eggs for their extraordinary creamy texture, and these are suited for the slow cook method.

 

Free range chicken eggs are good for everyday scramble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made hangtown fry with duck eggs last year. Essentially, a duck egg omelette with chopped fatty bacon and oysters folded in at the last moment. <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
personally, i don't like to add either cream of water to scrambled eggs.

 

do i have to go to whole foods to find cream of water?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
personally, i don't like to add either cream of water to scrambled eggs.

 

do i have to go to whole foods to find cream of water?

Here in Vermont, it comes straight from the tap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...