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ADNY Caught in a cycle where they have to increase prices because they don't get enough customers thus discouraging new customers. Plus the food isn’t very good.   Pure Food and Wine If Roxanne

ADNY is not a loss leader for the whole Ducasse organization. I doubt that that many people would go to Ducasse's French/Italian establishments because they experienced a good meal at ADNY. If they a

Here are the details:   "SAM DE MARCO has closed FIRST, his 10-year-old restaurant at 87 First Avenue (Fifth Street). He will be the consulting chef at MOVIDA, a nightclub and lounge opening soon at

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11 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

It’s ironic, BTW, that offal, traditionally a source of cheap protein for poor people, is now, in America, a signifier of elite taste.  

And annoying because the price went up.

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6 hours ago, Orik said:

Broadly:

California - egg in a spoon over open flame

New York - habanada on a stick

Elsewhere - the food there has improved so much, really, it's almost edible now

Two (overlapping) cuisines in New Orleans.

Low country.

Southern/Soul food.

Coastal (New England, also Maryland I assume).

Wild west (Colorado, Texas and I don't mean Tex Mex).

Probably more.

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Oh, add BBQ, which is in a slightly different category--not a regional cuisine, but a cuisine which appears in different versions in different regions--but distinctly American.

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I hesitated on Maryland as I don't know it first hand, but yes seafood: I don't know if the style is particularly distinct from New England in one direction or Low Country in the other.

For all the other examples, I think it would be easy to compose a menu which obviously and distinctively reflected the region (as well as to a degree reflecting regional home cooking too).  This is probably also true of regions I know less well, like the midwest. 

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Non-rhetorical I-don't-think-I-know-the-answers questions that I'm asking cuz I'd really like to know what people think.

Do you think you could open a new Obricki's-style crab parlor in Baltimore and have it considered a premiere new restaurant?  Would Low Country cooking be what it is right now if people like Shaun Brock didn't "Brooklynize" it (for lack of a better word)?

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9 minutes ago, Sneakeater said:

Non-rhetorical I-don't-think-I-know-the-answers questions that I'm asking cuz I'd really like to know what people think.

Do you think you could open a new Obricki's-style crab parlor in Baltimore and have it considered a premiere new restaurant?  Would Low Country cooking be what it is right now if people like Shaun Brock didn't "Brooklynize" it (for lack of a better word)?

I don't think so. But, also, it has to start somewhere. Also, I think this comes of of an article on Brock (maybe the New Yorker one), there is a history of products like Kentucky hams being widely known and well regarded internationally in the 19th century that faded in the 20th. 

There are a lot of politics (both class and race) circling  this discussion, of course.

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2 hours ago, Wilfrid said:

Two (overlapping) cuisines in New Orleans.

Low country.

Southern/Soul food.

Coastal (New England, also Maryland I assume).

Wild west (Colorado, Texas and I don't mean Tex Mex).

Probably more.

There are a couple distinctive strains of restaurant cooking as I argued a few pages back.

Related and unrelated, there is also a PBS-NPR-Alice Walters-Farmer's Market-New American strain that is absolutely it's own kind of cuisine. Part of what Brock did was that he married 
"exotic" low country cooking with this familiar bourgeois American aesthetic. Or as Sneak says, he "Brooklynized" it.

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28 minutes ago, Sneakeater said:

Non-rhetorical I-don't-think-I-know-the-answers questions that I'm asking cuz I'd really like to know what people think.

Do you think you could open a new Obricki's-style crab parlor in Baltimore and have it considered a premiere new restaurant?  Would Low Country cooking be what it is right now if people like Shaun Brock didn't "Brooklynize" it (for lack of a better word)?

Eh, Patrick O'connel is the king of low country cooking.. But, really it's just a mixture of European and Southern Food which is a combination of Cajun and African Food.. 

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6 minutes ago, Daniel said:

Eh, Patrick O'connel is the king of low country cooking.. But, really it's just a mixture of European and Southern Food which is a combination of Cajun and African Food.. 

Inn at Little Washington current menu: https://theinnatlittlewashington.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/IALW_Sample_Dinner_Menu_20237.pdf

I don't think it's ever been "traditional" low country cooking, but he's sort of the master of traditional American haute cuisine, which is a lot of European and  mixture of some American traditions, as you said. He's not making "hoppin' johns" an acceptable bistro dish. It's a different thing. What Brock did is that he made those vernacular dishes acceptable for dressed up people in good bistros and fancy spaces. Which also put some of those trad places on the foodie tourist map.

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My contribution was to argue that there are such things as distinctive American cuisines (inevitably traceable back to overseas roots, if we're not talking about indigenous cuisine). They are represented in restaurants, sure, but that is incidental to my claim.

I can grasp the argument that there is no American cuisine other than Native American, because it all came from somewhere else, but that's a bit like saying there are no Americans other than Native Americans. It's an interesting gambit, but doesn't really get us anywhere. Food travels (see Sokolov).

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2 minutes ago, Wilfrid said:

My contribution was to argue that there are such things as distinctive American cuisines (inevitably traceable back to overseas roots, if we're not talking about indigenous cuisine). They are represented in restaurants, sure, but that is incidental to my claim.

Yes man, I was agreeing with you and adding on. 

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1 minute ago, Wilfrid said:

My contribution was to argue that there are such things as distinctive American cuisines (inevitably traceable back to overseas roots, if we're not talking about indigenous cuisine). They are represented in restaurants, sure, but that is incidental to my claim.

Certainly.

 

 

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