Jump to content

Recommended Posts

 

If I wanted a device that fits in my pocket I would have bought an iPod Touch.

 

 

A friend suggested that I get an iPod Touch based on my needs, but I recently read this blog post that makes me a little wary (she's returning her iPod Touch and getting Kindle Fire, instead). Granted, it's just one person's experience, but I second-guess my decisions very easily!

I am returning my Bosch dishwasher and getting a Ford Pinto instead.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • Replies 411
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Product page.   Zdnet is dubious: "Is the Amazon Kindle going to be a monthly fee nightmare?"   Curious to see how this does.    

I'm pretty sure you can read blogs on the Kindle.

Amazon just unveiled Kindle Matchbook.* Amazon will search all of your past book purchases, and if a "match" exists, allow you to buy the Kindle book for $2.99 or less. At the moment, only 6 of my p

For those who aren't aware, you can loan some Kindle books for 14 days. Go to your account on Amazon, "Manage Your Kindle". You'll see a list of your Kindle books and to the right of each an "Action" dropdown. Click it to see if "Loan this Title" appears (not all books are loanable). Apparently, the loaned title is unavailable to the lender during the 14 days, and disappears from the lendee at the end of the period.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is "loan" not properly a verb?

 

"Loan" is a noun; "lend" is a verb.

Merriam-Webster says "loan" may be a verb.

 

From the "Usage Discussion" section for loan:verb

 

The verb loan is one of the words English settlers brought to America and continued to use after it had died out in Britain. Its use was soon noticed by British visitors and somewhat later by the New England literati, who considered it a bit provincial. It was flatly declared wrong in 1870 by a popular commentator, who based his objection on etymology. A later scholar showed that the commentator was ignorant of Old English and thus unsound in his objection, but by then it was too late, as the condemnation had been picked up by many other commentators. Although a surprising number of critics still voice objections, loan is entirely standard as a verb. You should note that it is used only literally; lend is the verb used for figurative expressions, such as “lending a hand” or “lending enchantment.”
Link to post
Share on other sites

For those who aren't aware, you can loan some Kindle books for 14 days. Go to your account on Amazon, "Manage Your Kindle". You'll see a list of your Kindle books and to the right of each an "Action" dropdown. Click it to see if "Loan this Title" appears (not all books are loanable). Apparently, the loaned title is unavailable to the lender during the 14 days, and disappears from the lendee at the end of the period.

the lendable books probably correspond pretty closely to the list of kindle books available through amazon from public libraries. it's a clever way to get you to market the service to your friends. at the end of the loan period, your friend will be offered the opportunity to purchase the book, if they want to keep it, much the same as at the end of the the library loan. the best part for amazon is if your friend signs up for kindle in order to borrow books from you, the fine folks at amazon get marketing information on your friend that they might not have had a crack at before and the chance to sell them similar types of material in the future or perhaps a peek at your reading list since you may share taste in reading material

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...