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I've had one for a week now and i'm getting into it.. it's taken the place of the newspaper on my ride in to work, and I like that I can email myself documents to review on it, without having to drag hard copies of documents back and forth between the office and home. I'm thinking that it'll probably come in pretty handy for the two 18 hour plane rides coming up in July..

 

I can see Amazon doing a big push for this in the legal field when the larger size comes out. As it is, I'm already reading transcripts and cases on the smaller size..

 

 

this is interesting. what is the advantage of reading dep transcripts, etc. on a kindle versus my laptop?

lighter?

 

I hope it is more than that. the weight of my laptop is not enough to justify buying another device.

 

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Product page.   Zdnet is dubious: "Is the Amazon Kindle going to be a monthly fee nightmare?"   Curious to see how this does.    

I'm pretty sure you can read blogs on the Kindle.

Amazon just unveiled Kindle Matchbook.* Amazon will search all of your past book purchases, and if a "match" exists, allow you to buy the Kindle book for $2.99 or less. At the moment, only 6 of my p

How important do people find the wireless download to be?

 

S, Some people obviously feel it is important as they are willing to pay a much higher price (for what I think is an inferior product to the Sony) in order to have the capability.

 

The hookup to the PC is more than sufficient for my purposes.

 

 

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what is the advantage of reading dep transcripts, etc. on a kindle versus my laptop?

 

Ron, Better mobility, readability, battery usage... plus features to assist with the reading experience, including book marks, indexing, place keeping, etc., etc.

 

There is no comparison, in my view, between using a laptop and an ebook reader.

 

 

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In the guise of open-minded consideration, Nicholson Baker stomps the Kindle in this week's New Yorker. My reading of his intentions is colored, I admit, by my appreciation of his efforts some years agi to explain why physical hard copies of major library catalogues needed to be preserved from destruction. As it happens, scanning technology would now overcome many of the objections he rightly raised back then.

 

As far as the Kindle is concerned, apart from predictable inconveniences, academically inclined readers will run screaming from a machine where...indexes don't always work, there's a problem with endnotes, citations need to be to a scan-range rather than a page number - there are no page numbers :shriek: - and the loss or downgrading of illustrations seems to be a problem too.

 

Paper and ink is safe for a couple more years.

 

ETA: Per Ron's questions about transcripts, I think there's a problem with importing pdfs too - but I may have got that wrong.

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As far as the Kindle is concerned, apart from predictable inconveniences, academically inclined readers will run screaming from a machine where...indexes don't always work, there's a problem with endnotes, citations need to be to a scan-range rather than a page number - there are no page numbers :shriek: - and the loss or downgrading of illustrations seems to be a problem too.

 

Paper and ink is safe for a couple more years.

 

Technical difficulties aside, The two primary issues with kindle are the murder of used book and the ability of Amazon to take your books away from you (or to just go out of business). It remains to be seen if publishers also use digital readers to put an end to libraries.

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Technical difficulties aside, The two primary issues with kindle are the murder of used book and the ability of Amazon to take your books away from you (or to just go out of business). It remains to be seen if publishers also use digital readers to put an end to libraries.

 

Digital readers put an end to libraries, and the providers then go out of business, Kindle turning out to be appropriately named.

 

Not yet, anyway.

 

Even if Kindle worked well (and I have said often enough that the Complete New Yorker project, which I've only viewed on PC, works really very well), the books I want to read are unlikely to be available any time soon.

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Technical difficulties aside, The two primary issues with kindle are the murder of used book and the ability of Amazon to take your books away from you (or to just go out of business). It remains to be seen if publishers also use digital readers to put an end to libraries.

 

Digital readers put an end to libraries, and the providers then go out of business, Kindle turning out to be appropriately named.

 

Not yet, anyway.

 

Even if Kindle worked well (and I have said often enough that the Complete New Yorker project, which I've only viewed on PC, works really very well), the books I want to read are unlikely to be available any time soon.

 

What books are you looking for? We've had a Kindle for maybe a year or so. Works fine. My husband loves reading the classics - usually about 99 cents (sometimes free). Robyn

 

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How important do people find the wireless download to be? I was going to buy a Kindle for a friend who's moving to Australia and will be traveling a lot around Asia, but apparently they can't get wireless downloads in Oz; only usb.

 

If you're doing books - you can always download at home - and then read on the road. If you were doing something more time sensitive - you'd be kind of stuck. FWIW - the Kindle works on the Sprint network if I recall correctly. So wherever you can connect to Sprint - you can download wireless. Robyn

 

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What books are you looking for? We've had a Kindle for maybe a year or so. Works fine. My husband loves reading the classics - usually about 99 cents (sometimes free). Robyn

 

Rare stuff, long out print, hard to find in large libraries. Is there a site you can go to which tells you what's available on Kindle? I'd be curious to check that out.

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