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I've had one for a week now and i'm getting into it.. it's taken the place of the newspaper on my ride in to work, and I like that I can email myself documents to review on it, without having to drag hard copies of documents back and forth between the office and home. I'm thinking that it'll probably come in pretty handy for the two 18 hour plane rides coming up in July..

 

I can see Amazon doing a big push for this in the legal field when the larger size comes out. As it is, I'm already reading transcripts and cases on the smaller size..

 

 

this is interesting. what is the advantage of reading dep transcripts, etc. on a kindle versus my laptop?

I feel more comfortable reading the Kindle on the subway than I do on my laptop. Also, the screen is much better to read on than my laptop. First thing in the morning and late in the evening I'm not so into staring at the laptop.

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Product page.   Zdnet is dubious: "Is the Amazon Kindle going to be a monthly fee nightmare?"   Curious to see how this does.    

I'm pretty sure you can read blogs on the Kindle.

Amazon just unveiled Kindle Matchbook.* Amazon will search all of your past book purchases, and if a "match" exists, allow you to buy the Kindle book for $2.99 or less. At the moment, only 6 of my p

What books are you looking for? We've had a Kindle for maybe a year or so. Works fine. My husband loves reading the classics - usually about 99 cents (sometimes free). Robyn

 

Rare stuff, long out print, hard to find in large libraries. Is there a site you can go to which tells you what's available on Kindle? I'd be curious to check that out.

 

amazon.com

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What books are you looking for? We've had a Kindle for maybe a year or so. Works fine. My husband loves reading the classics - usually about 99 cents (sometimes free). Robyn

 

Rare stuff, long out print, hard to find in large libraries. Is there a site you can go to which tells you what's available on Kindle? I'd be curious to check that out.

 

I think the Kindle Amazon Store has a full listing, but you'd still be typing in entries and hitting search (i.e. it's not one long list that you can glance through).

 

eta: I don't know if these duplicate some of the amazon stuff, but this page has more listings (for free books), including a link for the Project Gutenberg.

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Rare stuff, long out print, hard to find in large libraries. Is there a site you can go to which tells you what's available on Kindle? I'd be curious to check that out.

 

Wilfrid, If you're interested, there are lots of sites that provide ebooks in formats that can be downloaded to the Sony eReaders.

 

 

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What books are you looking for? We've had a Kindle for maybe a year or so. Works fine. My husband loves reading the classics - usually about 99 cents (sometimes free). Robyn

 

Rare stuff, long out print, hard to find in large libraries. Is there a site you can go to which tells you what's available on Kindle? I'd be curious to check that out.

 

There's a Kindle Store on Amazon. So you can check there and see what's available. My husband and I usually use Alibris for hard to find/out of print books. But sometimes the prices are ridiculous (e.g., I was trying to buy some OOP menu readers a while back - and they wanted $50 for them) - so you just have to wait until one comes up where the price is right. Robyn

 

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In the guise of open-minded consideration, Nicholson Baker stomps the Kindle in this week's New Yorker. My reading of his intentions is colored, I admit, by my appreciation of his efforts some years agi to explain why physical hard copies of major library catalogues needed to be preserved from destruction. As it happens, scanning technology would now overcome many of the objections he rightly raised back then.

 

As far as the Kindle is concerned, apart from predictable inconveniences, academically inclined readers will run screaming from a machine where...indexes don't always work, there's a problem with endnotes, citations need to be to a scan-range rather than a page number - there are no page numbers :shriek: - and the loss or downgrading of illustrations seems to be a problem too.

 

Paper and ink is safe for a couple more years.

 

ETA: Per Ron's questions about transcripts, I think there's a problem with importing pdfs too - but I may have got that wrong.

A stupid article by a not stupid man. Will elaborate later.

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usually use Alibris for hard to find/out of print books.

 

Robyn etal,

 

There are numerous ebook sites with new and old ebooks, including quite a few that have free ebooks. These ebooks can be downloaded by Calibre (a free software package) and stored on the Sony eBook Reader for reading.

 

For now - my husband uses the Kindle. I took a look - and I don't think that software will work on a Kindle. Also - I think my husband is more than a little rusty in terms of his programming skills (he's taken a lot of university courses since he retired - but most of his recent courses were in theoretical types of mathematics). Robyn

 

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A stupid article by a not stupid man. Will elaborate later.

 

I'm not sure why one has to choose between exclusive use of one format or the other (except maybe when you're going on vacation and have to decide whether to carry a real book or a Kindle on the plane). Robyn

 

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full disclosure:

 

I am a reference librarian, MLS and all, who has worked in my profession for almost 30 years.

I am the semi-Luddite of the crew. If i can figure out how to do it just about anyone can.

 

We have two Kindle I's at work and for general reading, traveling I like it. In the had it feels like a trade paper and after about 5 minutes I forget that is is an electronic device. I totally disliked the Kindle II - a bit too big to be held in one hand but without the book feel of Kindle I.

 

There are other e-readers out there and for the younger people - especially in academic institutions- these will be the way they go. There will still be a place for paper as even small children recognize the difference between paper - or in some cases - board books and a computerized book.

 

They have their place and paper books have theirs at this point at least. I can see reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle or Pollan's book on a Kindle but I want the paper version of Mastering the Art of French Cooking or The New Portugese Table from which to cook.

 

As far as Mr. Baker goes - he has some points but I challenge him to actually WORK in a small public library today without the access to digitized or paid online access to periodicals. Yes, folks - not everything online is free. Many of us subscribe to databases to the tune of several thousand dollars a year to give our patrons remote access - course that is very much cheaper than it would cost us to subscribe to the paper product - not to mention the problem of storage.

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Nicholson Baker may have written a stupid article, but he's right about at least one thing: an advantage to the iPhone Kindle app is that you can read in bed with the light off.

 

I've been using the app for a couple of weeks and have some mixed experiences. The parts I thought I'd hate turned out not to be a problem. Reading on a screen, even for two hours or so, is fine and doesn't cause any significant eye strain, less than a computer screen. The small screen means you have to turn the "page" more often than in a book, but I got used to that before long.

 

The portability is nice, as is the ability to read with one hand (especially on a subway). I like being able to pick up and put down the "book" at a moment's notice. It's ideal for light reading on a commute, while waiting on line, hanging at the playground with the kid, and so on.

 

The software needs some work. Sometimes while syncing with the Amazon servers, it will hang up for a couple of seconds: annoying. And sometimes it will forget where I left off reading last and I'll have to scroll around to find it, which can be a real hassle: skimming is much more difficult than in a paper book.

 

The biggest problems I've encountered are due to the iPhone's limitations. Obviously you can't read without a battery, and my 3G's battery life isn't good. And last weekend, while on a trip to the shore, my iPhone crashed and wouldn't open any downloaded apps. It was easy to fix once I got home, but I wasn't able to read anything until then. Annoying.

 

But it works at least pretty well. I'm leaving this afternoon for a trip to Seattle and have downloaded a couple of books rather than bring paper books. So I'll keep using it, if not relying on it.

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...They have their place and paper books have theirs at this point at least. I can see reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle or Pollan's book on a Kindle but I want the paper version of Mastering the Art of French Cooking or The New Portugese Table from which to cook...

 

Especially because your real book will probably survive a spill in the kitchen - but your Kindle probably won't! Robyn

 

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i bought an e-reader, the small new sony, yesterday. it will be fine for its intended use, which involves keeping me busy on the subway. but what i don't understand is where i'm supposed to buy readers for the other letters in the alphabet.

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i bought an e-reader, the small new sony, yesterday. it will be fine for its intended use, which involves keeping me busy on the subway. but what i don't understand is where i'm supposed to buy readers for the other letters in the alphabet.

not invented yet. be patient. in the meantime, the i-phone amazon reader gets you one more letter

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