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Since we do not have a section for holidays, I am putting this holiday here because the reason for this holiday began in Israel.

 

Hannukah began last night and I will be posting some goodies that I am making for the holiday.

 

I am making Italian, Moroccan and German Hannukah specialties.

 

What are you making?

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Happy Hannukah from Dave Grohl covering The Ramones:    

Shouldn't Christmas threads go here, too, then?

Any latke tips/tricks?

 

Potato/onion ratios? Use/forego egg/flour/matzoh meal? Baking powder?

 

Re: making ahead, I've read that refrigerating makes them soggy, and that even if it's just for a day, better to place the freshly-fried specimens on a sheet pan, freeze and then seal in a plastic bag. To serve, reheat/crisp @ 450F.

 

 

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Any latke tips/tricks?

 

Potato/onion ratios? Use/forego egg/flour/matzoh meal? Baking powder?

 

Re: making ahead, I've read that refrigerating makes them soggy, and that even if it's just for a day, better to place the freshly-fried specimens on a sheet pan, freeze and then seal in a plastic bag. To serve, reheat/crisp @ 450F.

 

I use this recipe to make latkes:

 

Potato Latkes

 

I prefer them without flour and/or matza meal and I never use baking powder. I am also going to make a potato-sage fritter that I am going to make tomorrow night. I will post the recipe and pictures.

 

I have made them a few hours ahead and then reheated them in the oven, but I know some people make them, freeze them and then defrost and reheat in the oven. Refrigerating them definitely makes them soggy.

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Here's pretty much what my family uses.

 

Note what she says about matzo meal, which I recommend. I don't put scallions in.

 

 

 

Crispy Traditional Pancakes

 

This recipe is originally from the cookbook Jewish Cooking in America. Nathan says she makes them "very thin," but those who want thicker latkes can add matzo meal or flour.

 

2 pounds russet (baking) or Yukon Gold Potatoes

1 medium onion

1-1/2 cups chopped scallions, including the green part

1 large egg, beaten

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Vegetable oil for frying

 

Traditional latkes

 

1. Peel the potatoes and put in cold water. Using a grater or a food processor, coarsely grate the potatoes and onions. Place together in a fine-mesh strainer or tea towel and squeeze out all the water over a bowl. The potato starch will settle to the bottom: reserve that after you have carefully poured off the water.

 

2. Mix the potato and onion with the potato starch. Add the scallions, egg, and salt and pepper.

 

3. Heat a griddle or non-stick pan and coat with a thin film of vegetable oil. Take about 2 tablespoons of the potato mixture in the palm of your hand and flatten as best you can. Place the potato mixture on the griddle, flatten with a large spatula, and fry for a few minutes until golden. Flip the pancake over and brown the other side. Remove to paper towels to drain. Serve immediately. (The latkes also can be frozen to be served at a later time, after crisping in a 350-degree oven.)

 

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I use the proportions from Mimi Sheraton's recipe in From My Mother's Kitchen, but grate the potatoes with the shredding blade of the food processor. She calls for 2 1/2 lbs of medium old potatoes (I often use Yukon Gold), 1 large onion, 2 eggs, separated (I don't bother), 2 T. potato flour or matzah meal (I use matzah meal), 1 scant tablespoons of salt, 1 teaspoon white pepper (I don't mind the black flecks) and corn oil for frying.

 

Grate the onion and potato alternately to prevent the potato from oxidizing (unless you actually want the traditional taupe of our people.) Transfer to a bowl and squeeze out excess liquid by handfuls. Reserve the liquid and let it settle for a few minutes until the starch collects at the bottom. Pour off the water. and mix the starch into the potato and onions. Egg the eggs, matsah meal salt and pepper and mix. Fry in the corn oil and keep warm, if necessary in a 250 degree oven for no more than 15 minutes. (Many people say you can make these ahead an re-crisp in the oven, but I never do it. I think latkes are like tempura.)

 

This is essentially the only use I make of corn oil during the year, but I consider it essential, since that was my grandmother's oil of choice and latkes don't taste right to me without it. She used to grate the potatoes by hand, of course, but I prefer the long thin shreds of the food processor.

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I do not like Yukon Golds for this purpose.

 

But 2 eggs for 2.5 lbs of potatoes is better than 2 eggs for 1.25 pounds of potatoes.

 

I use the food processor too unless I'm just making a few. But some say hand grating adds that extra something...like pieces of knuckle skin. :lol:

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