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Here is the schedule for Music Mountain, summer 2008.

 

They try to present one relatively modern piece (sometimes contemporary) piece in most programs and the oldsters tolerate it.

 

Music Mountain is one of my favorite places on earth. Last year we noticed that there were a few younger people in the audience. (The term "younger" is relative, of course. )

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Much contemporary pop music is just noise to me.

 

I agree completely, despite swearing in my twenties that such a thing would never happen to me. The older I get, the more I like classical music.

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I get increasingly interested in hip hop as I get older - it was once a repetitive thump to me.

 

I might even perceive some merit in Mozart one day. Who knows? Can't love everything - there just isn't time.

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I get increasingly interested in hip hop as I get older - it was once a repetitive thump to me.

 

I might even perceive some merit in Mozart one day. Who knows? Can't love everything - there just isn't time.

Check out Wale--100 Miles and Running.

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Shameless plug alert: if anyone is interested in hearing a program of 20th-century modernist classical pieces, including 2 works from the 1980s, come to the Dessoff Choirs' next concert on Thursday, May 1st. We'll be doing Dominick Argento's "I Hate and I Love", Bernstein's "Missa Brevis", and Luigi Dallapiccola's "Canti di Prigonia". More details here.

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As for Wilfrid's point about the visual arts, this is something I've thought about a lot. i think one of the biggest causes of resistance to music is that one is giving up time in a very fixed way. Prometeo is going to last for 2 hours, like it or not, you can't walk away and move on to the next painting or ask your friend what they think that yellow splodge in the corner is doing there. So I do sometimes think the medium is fundamentally unsuited to the nature of modern life sometimes.

 

so, you're coming around on adorno then....

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I've never been entirely anti-Adorno, it's just completely rammed down one's throat by a lot of the composers I've associated with and that makes me uncomfortable with it. The idea that one is somehow writing music in order to allow one's audience to better appreciate Frankfurt dialectic negation seems rather absurd to me.

 

This, for example, by a truly truly awful and not very well known composer I will not identify, surely has to be the least enticing sounding aesthetic project of all time:

 

X's music seeks to pursue and further develop that programme of radical abstraction initiated during the period of high modernism in the 1950s. In consequence, his work, reflecting those strictures formulated in Greenbergian modernism and reflected in the critical-theoretic work of Theodor Adorno, asserts the autonomy of the medium and creative action from all notions of market utility. This places Downie's creative programme in firm opposition to those trends of marketisation that have subsequently restored the servility of composers and aesthetic action to the priorities of the market. As those organizational and aesthetic tendencies associated with integral serialism and constructionism represent a zero point in the maturation of music, Downie sees no alternative than to their continued pursuance. Within such a context, no alternative creative action is tenable.

 

I believe music has a genuine philosophical dimension, but more important is that one has to love the way it sounds.

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I believe music has a genuine philosophical dimension, but more important is that one has to love the way it sounds.

I couldn't possibly agree with you more.

 

The qualifier is, of course, that what I think sounds good is I can only imagine very different to what most other people here would think sounds good. Not to mention that of course the notion of 'sounding good' is a highly culturally conditioned one. However, the point that really worries me about the insane philosophy quoted above is that I really suspect this composer hates the way his own music sounds, but seems to think he has to write that way because of some dialectical obligation...

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I think the student rush program is a noble one, but I see the NY Philharmonic's issues as being ones of programming. Last year I was looking at their upcoming season schedule, and there just wasn't anything in there that called out to me. It was just the same old, same old.

 

I think they need a shot of something new. Or something old, but dormant (by necessity wonderful, but long-forgotten).

 

But the problem is that their subscriber base goes apeshit at any departure from the same old same old. I've seen it happen during my many years as a subscriber there. Those old people get NASTY.

 

They're walking a tightrope. They want to attract new subcribers, but they're afraid of alienating the subscribers they have. I think they'll have to make a choice at some point.

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Luigi Dallapiccola's "Canti di Prigonia".

 

See, that's exactly the kind of twelve-tone piece I think audiences would connect with because of its vocal content.

 

I'll be going to Fredric Rzewski that night, but I can't wait to hear how the Dallapiccola goes over.

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I think the student rush program is a noble one, but I see the NY Philharmonic's issues as being ones of programming. Last year I was looking at their upcoming season schedule, and there just wasn't anything in there that called out to me. It was just the same old, same old.

 

I think they need a shot of something new. Or something old, but dormant (by necessity wonderful, but long-forgotten).

 

But the problem is that their subscriber base goes apeshit at any departure from the same old same old. I've seen it happen during my many years as a subscriber there. Those old people get NASTY.

 

They're walking a tightrope. They want to attract new subcribers, but they're afraid of alienating the subscribers they have. I think they'll have to make a choice at some point.

But couldn't they do a small series comprised of the new or newly rediscovered or some such thing? Leaving the mass of the programming alone in order to assuage the traditional base? Or set it up so that one evening of each of the programs had something a little different in it?

 

Just throwing things out there. They have to do something, or they'll be dead in a decade or two.

 

 

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