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This is something which could go in the Cheerful or Annoying category, but I think we need a niche for just good old air-headery.   One of the morning news shows featured a discussion of last night

Yes Wilf. Montrous commentary. I will not say anymoore because I'll be violating some our mores.

AAAA!!!! AAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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I dunno. Historical ignorance of popular music (actually, music in general) is just a sticking point for some of us -- especially when it's on the part of rock fans overestimating the importance and quality of that genre.

 

I got unduly annoyed by that thread here that asked what "the greatest decade for music" was -- with the choices beginning with the 1960s.

There's just so much ignorance around that my priorities constantly shift as to what pisses me off the most.

 

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So, like, are we going to kill the writer's family too? Maybe torch his house and then shoot them one by one when they come out?

 

No. We are going to do that to the responsible editor's family.

 

It's an especial bugbear with me that several pairs of eyes surely saw this article before it was printed. It's not a blog post. I infer not necessarily widespread ignorance, but that casual who-gives-a-fuck attitude I have recently detected in Adam Platt's writing (some say it is nothing new).

 

Everything about the sentence is wrong. The Rolling Stones aren't "singers", they have no special connection to Chicago, and anyone being paid to write that sentence should have thought of another example.

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As promised.

 

Brooklyn’s New Culinary Movement

 

I made the mistake of reading this over my morning coffee at 7:00AM. This is awful stuff, far worse than that offhand remark about singers in Chicago.

 

These Brooklynites, most in their 20s and 30s, are hand-making pickles, cheeses and chocolates the way others form bands and artists’ collectives. They have a sense of community and an appreciation for traditional methods and flavors. They also share an aesthetic that’s equal parts 19th and 21st century, with a taste for bold graphics, salvaged wood and, for the men, scruffy beards.

Can you say "trust fund?"

 

 

Gabrielle Langholtz, the editor of Edible Brooklyn, which chronicles the borough’s food scene, said it has grown along with the arrival of what she calls the “new demographic.”

 

“It’s that guy in the band with the big plastic glasses who’s already asking for grass-fed steak and knows about nibs,” Ms. Langholtz said.

 

“Ten years ago all of these people hadn’t moved to Brooklyn yet,” she added, comparing Brooklyn today to Berkeley in the 1970s. “There’s a relationship to food that comes with that approach to the universe,” Ms. Langholtz said. “Every person you pass has read Michael Pollan, every person has thought about joining a raw milk club, and if they haven’t made ricotta, they want to.”

My dilemma: In front of me is "that guy in the band with the big plastic glasses" and Ms. Langholtz. I have a gun but only one bullet. Who do I shoot? I'm leaning toward Gabrielle.

 

Yes. I was right.

 

 

Along with butchering whole animals, Mr. Castronovo and Mr. Falcinelli, the owners of Frankies Spuntino restaurants in Brooklyn and the Lower East Side of Manhattan, will be making their own charcuterie at Prime Meats.

 

“The whole process, truthfully, will take a long time.” Mr. Falcinelli said. “The aged stuff will take a year to understand. Pâté will take a few months.”

I like the Frankies - I've been happily eating at the original branch of the Sputino since it opened in 2003. But what the hell is Falcinelli talking about? Understand? I really am up to speed on the concept of pepperoni. I get it. It will either taste good or it won't but I'll understand it either way.

 

There's much more in this vein. I need to lie down.

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“Ten years ago all of these people hadn’t moved to Brooklyn yet,”

 

gets me angry in almost the same way that Rolling Stones, Muddy Waters does.

 

I guess it's good. Now that my (genuine) bud Nathan has joined the Army, I need another source of aggravation over Young People's thinking they invented everything.

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I'm glad you spotted that one. There's so many there.

The Brooklyn Kitchen carries major brands, but it is the sole retailer for knives from Cut Brooklyn, a local specialty knife maker.

 

“It’s difficult to keep those guys stocked,” said Joel Bukiewicz, Cut Brooklyn’s owner and solitary employee. “It’s like sweeping a dirt floor.”

 

Maybe that’s because Mr. Bukiewicz takes 10 to 12 hours to fashion one eight-inch chef’s knife. In an average week he will make between four and six knives. He first learned how to make hunting knives in Georgia, and started creating kitchen knives in his small Gowanus workshop in 2007.

 

“There’s an appreciation here for craftsmanship and people who work with their hands,” Mr. Bukiewicz said. “I had no idea there was going to be this convergence of artists, artisans and food culture in Brooklyn.”

 

10 to 12 hours a knife? I'm trying to understand this business model. Yes, it works in Japan where it takes months to make a samurai sword but unlike the master craftsmen of Japan who are following a tradition that's more than 500 years old, Mr. Bukiewicz is making chef's knives in Brooklyn.

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I'm glad you spotted that one. There's so many there.

The Brooklyn Kitchen carries major brands, but it is the sole retailer for knives from Cut Brooklyn, a local specialty knife maker.

 

“It’s difficult to keep those guys stocked,” said Joel Bukiewicz, Cut Brooklyn’s owner and solitary employee. “It’s like sweeping a dirt floor.”

 

Maybe that’s because Mr. Bukiewicz takes 10 to 12 hours to fashion one eight-inch chef’s knife. In an average week he will make between four and six knives. He first learned how to make hunting knives in Georgia, and started creating kitchen knives in his small Gowanus workshop in 2007.

 

“There’s an appreciation here for craftsmanship and people who work with their hands,” Mr. Bukiewicz said. “I had no idea there was going to be this convergence of artists, artisans and food culture in Brooklyn.”

 

10 to 12 hours a knife? I'm trying to understand this business model. Yes, it works in Japan where it takes months to make a samurai sword but unlike the master craftsmen of Japan who are following a tradition that's more than 500 years old, Mr. Bukiewicz is making chef's knives in Brooklyn.

so, what does he charge $5000 a knife?

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so, what does he charge $5000 a knife?

 

I'm trying to figure that out. Coincidentally, Deb and I happened to walk into the place (The Brooklyn Kitchen) where his knives are sold last Saturday. It had the usual stuff, some of it at decent prices, but there were plenty of annoying things I'd classify as kitchen toys. Some examples:

 

The Garlic Zoom

chefn%20garlic%20zoom.jpg 574244v1.jpg

 

You put the garlic in and then enlist the aid of a 7 year old to roll it around your counter to chop the garlic. Afterwards, you open the thing up and take the garlic out. Wow. Look out, Chef of the Future. The thing must be impossible to clean too.

 

And the Cross Cutting Garlic Twist.

Garlic_Twist_How_To_1.jpg Garlic_Twist_How_To_4.jpg

 

It's billed as "the one kitchen utensil you cannot live without!" Well, somehow I'll try. Just when did garlic become so fucking hard to cut?

 

I saw the knives behind the counter - they looked just like ordinary cutlery. They didn't shimmer with a mystical spiritual force or anything like that. I just checked his prices and he tops out at $350 a knife. That means his hourly rate is between $29 to $35. They look like nice knives but Joel needs to rethink his business model.

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<snippage>

 

The Garlic Zoom

chefn%20garlic%20zoom.jpg 574244v1.jpg

 

You put the garlic in and then enlist the aid of a 7 year old to roll it around your counter to chop the garlic. Afterwards, you open the thing up and take the garlic out. Wow. Look out, Chef of the Future. The thing must be impossible to clean too.

i'm guessing the 7 year old is sold separately

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