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My mom has something similar to the 2nd garlic toy shown here, but it has actual blades and could do some serious damage if you got your fingers in there. It's quite handy for doing quick large amounts of garlic and ginger, but if I'm only doing a few cloves, give me my knife.

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This is something which could go in the Cheerful or Annoying category, but I think we need a niche for just good old air-headery.   One of the morning news shows featured a discussion of last night

Yes Wilf. Montrous commentary. I will not say anymoore because I'll be violating some our mores.

AAAA!!!! AAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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I'm glad you spotted that one. There's so many there.

The Brooklyn Kitchen carries major brands, but it is the sole retailer for knives from Cut Brooklyn, a local specialty knife maker.

 

"It's difficult to keep those guys stocked," said Joel Bukiewicz, Cut Brooklyn's owner and solitary employee. "It's like sweeping a dirt floor."

 

Maybe that's because Mr. Bukiewicz takes 10 to 12 hours to fashion one eight-inch chef's knife. In an average week he will make between four and six knives. He first learned how to make hunting knives in Georgia, and started creating kitchen knives in his small Gowanus workshop in 2007.

 

"There's an appreciation here for craftsmanship and people who work with their hands," Mr. Bukiewicz said. "I had no idea there was going to be this convergence of artists, artisans and food culture in Brooklyn."

 

10 to 12 hours a knife? I'm trying to understand this business model. Yes, it works in Japan where it takes months to make a samurai sword but unlike the master craftsmen of Japan who are following a tradition that's more than 500 years old, Mr. Bukiewicz is making chef's knives in Brooklyn.

so, what does he charge $5000 a knife?

 

 

$180

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They'll be setting up a kiln in the back yard and making their own pottery as well as weaving their own cloth for the napkins.

 

Don't ask how they'll make their own fertilizer.

Why is everyone surprised that people in the sticks behave like yokels?

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They'll be setting up a kiln in the back yard and making their own pottery as well as weaving their own cloth for the napkins.

 

Don't ask how they'll make their own fertilizer.

Why is everyone surprised that people in the sticks behave like yokels?

hey, they got electric lights and those magic boxes with the moving pictures, they're not yokels. hicks maybe but surely not yokels

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Guest Aaron T
$180

 

$180 to $350. Scroll down.

 

I should hope that he's getting $350 for 10 to 12 hours of work otherwise he's earning $18 an hour. He might as well work at Walmart.

 

Don't forget the cut that the store takes... The "artisan" is likely only getting half or maybe a bit more of the sales price.

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Guest Aaron T
$180

 

$180 to $350. Scroll down.

 

I should hope that he's getting $350 for 10 to 12 hours of work otherwise he's earning $18 an hour. He might as well work at Walmart.

 

Don't forget the cut that the store takes... The "artisan" is likely only getting half or maybe a bit more of the sales price.

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They'll be setting up a kiln in the back yard and making their own pottery as well as weaving their own cloth for the napkins.

 

Don't ask how they'll make their own fertilizer.

Why is everyone surprised that people in the sticks behave like yokels?

 

Like Hopkins playing Hannibal Lecter, aren't you worried about being typecast?

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They'll be setting up a kiln in the back yard and making their own pottery as well as weaving their own cloth for the napkins.

 

Don't ask how they'll make their own fertilizer.

Why is everyone surprised that people in the sticks behave like yokels?

 

Like Hopkins playing Hannibal Lecter, aren't you worried about being typecast?

Hush, it's good that people are put off coming out to our countryside.

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They'll be setting up a kiln in the back yard and making their own pottery as well as weaving their own cloth for the napkins.

 

Don't ask how they'll make their own fertilizer.

Why is everyone surprised that people in the sticks behave like yokels?

 

Like Hopkins playing Hannibal Lecter, aren't you worried about being typecast?

Hush, it's good that people are put off coming out to our countryside.

Dr. Johnson was referring to the outer boroughs of New York City.

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<snippage>

 

The Garlic Zoom

chefn%20garlic%20zoom.jpg 574244v1.jpg

 

You put the garlic in and then enlist the aid of a 7 year old to roll it around your counter to chop the garlic. Afterwards, you open the thing up and take the garlic out. Wow. Look out, Chef of the Future. The thing must be impossible to clean too.

i'm guessing the 7 year old is sold separately

My family has a tradition of giving one another absurd kitchen gadgets of minimal utility to one another for Christmas. This is what my mom got this year.

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Us, too, Anthony! And I just found a bunch of new fangled mechanical apple peelers back on the shelves. When will The Whole Earth Catalog be reprised along with geodesic domes?! Yokels become Earth First Intellectuals.

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