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This is something which could go in the Cheerful or Annoying category, but I think we need a niche for just good old air-headery.   One of the morning news shows featured a discussion of last night

Yes Wilf. Montrous commentary. I will not say anymoore because I'll be violating some our mores.

AAAA!!!! AAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Hurricane Ike is on it's way to kick Texas' ass. Galveston and Houston are being warned by the National Weather Service -

 

“Persons not heeding evacuation orders in single-family one- or two-story homes will face certain death,” the National Weather Service said in a local bulletin. “Many residences of average construction directly on the coast will be destroyed.”

 

You'd think that would make an impression. Not on everyone. From the NY Times:

 

Thousands fled the island earlier in the day in private cars or on government-chartered buses, but a few diehards insisted they would stay in their homes. One was Denise Scurry, a 46-year-old pool hall employee who was sitting on a milk crate Thursday afternoon in downtown Galveston near her two-story home, reading “Thugs and the Women Who Love Them” and sipping brandy.

 

“It ain’t going to be nothing but wind and rain,” she said. “Everybody’s all excited about nothing.”

 

 

 

Anyone else thinking 'natural selection'??

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Hurricane Ike is on it's way to kick Texas' ass. Galveston and Houston are being warned by the National Weather Service -

 

“Persons not heeding evacuation orders in single-family one- or two-story homes will face certain death,” the National Weather Service said in a local bulletin. “Many residences of average construction directly on the coast will be destroyed.”

 

You'd think that would make an impression. Not on everyone. From the NY Times:

 

Thousands fled the island earlier in the day in private cars or on government-chartered buses, but a few diehards insisted they would stay in their homes. One was Denise Scurry, a 46-year-old pool hall employee who was sitting on a milk crate Thursday afternoon in downtown Galveston near her two-story home, reading “Thugs and the Women Who Love Them” and sipping brandy.

 

“It ain’t going to be nothing but wind and rain,” she said. “Everybody’s all excited about nothing.”

 

 

 

Anyone else thinking 'natural selection'??

At 46 it's about 30 years too late. :rolleyes:

 

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Dingbats can be guys, right? What's the male called? Just experienced one. I was volunteered this morning (here in the PNW) to walk my granddaughter to the school bus at the end of the block. All nine kids in line live on this block. Five adults were in attendance. Two drove, though not a cloud in the sky. One father stood outside his car and offered his observations about the weather while he let his Hummer idle the whole time, spewing exhaust fumes at the children in line. Does this go in the Surreal or Annoyances topics? I don't have a reply. I'm speechless.

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Talk about "what goes around comes around" -

 

A stockbroker has been charged with stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from clients and sending the money overseas to Nigerian scam artists.

 

Prosecutors said former Tripp & Co. Inc. broker Michael Axel forged at least $600,000 worth of checks on four clients' accounts. One was a public high school teacher; the other three were in their 80s and 90s.

 

Axel, 68, was released without bail after being arraigned Thursday on grand larceny and forgery charges. He faces up to 15 years in prison if convicted on the top count, second-degree grand larceny.

 

Axel's lawyer, David Gourevitch, declined to comment.

 

Axel sent most of the stolen money to a phony lawyer in Nigeria who e-mailed him from Nigeria to say Axel had inherited $8.75 million from a distant relative, prosecutors said. That person told Axel he needed to send "up front" money for legal fees to free up the inheritance.

 

That 2005 e-mail to Axel was part of a common scam in which individuals overseas try to get Americans to send them money, saying it's needed to pay for legal procedures to free up money the victims have coming to them.

 

"This is a classic example of one con man taking another con man," Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau said. Axel fell for the scheme and never got any of that money back, Morgenthau said.

 

Axel is due back in Manhattan state Supreme Court on Nov. 16. Justice Lewis Bart Stone said the case may be resolved by then.

 

Morgenthau said Axel's thefts included $150,000 from a high school teacher's account from 2002 through 2005. The broker stole $400,000 the next year from another client, a 92-year-old resident of an assisted living facility, the district attorney said.

 

After an 88-year-old client of Axel's died in May 2007, the broker stole $10,000 from an account she held with her daughter, Morgenthau said. He said Axel also took $13,000 from an account that belonged to an 83-year-old man and his son.

 

Morgenthau said Tripp & Co. repaid the clients Axel victimized. He said Axel has repaid Tripp about half of what he stole.

 

http://www.newsday.com/news/local/newyork/...,0,325486.story

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  • 1 month later...

Sound the fanfare for Ms Fuschia Dunlop of the Financial Times:

 

There is something sweetly decadent about being a woman in a restaurant alone, well-dressed and content, enjoying a platter of rugged oysters on their bed of ice. I don’t do it often, but when I do, it makes me feel like a “fast” woman of the 1920s, wearing trousers and smoking cigarettes; or a swashbuckling English missionary of the 1930s, crossing the Gobi Desert on a cart drawn by mules; even, at times, Mata Hari. Eating oysters alone, and enjoying them as much as I do, makes me feel that I am capable of anything.

 

It's dinner. Get over it.

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm trying to move a fairly large sum of money from one place to another with some degree of alacrity. Signatures are required on a wire form. I sign the form, scan it to a colleague with the attached message: " Please print the attachment, sign on the bottom right, scan and send it to MrX@QEDSecurities.com. Thanks."

 

Mr. X., the intended recipient of the wire request, informs me this morning that he has not received the form. I get on the phone with the colleague's assistant who says to me, "I wired it to MrX@QEDSecurities-dot-com-dot." "Excuse me??" "Uh, you wrote the email address with a dot before and after the 'com'." "Uh, that was a period. To end a declarative sentence, you know?" "Ohhhhhh."

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On the phone with the finance clerk who processes our cheque requisitions. There was an error with the last one that they processed for my boss. First, she tried to tell me that this was the first time this mistake had been made. I had to inform her that no, finance has made this same mistake many many times. She again said no. ummmm.....ok.....Then I asked about the US component that had been missed. She told me that it had been crossed out. Crossed out in purple, kind of like a highlighter. That would be the highlighter that I used to differentiate between the US and CAD funds. She insisted that it looked crossed out.........Is there a wall I can bang my head on?? oh yes...right behind me.

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