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Doctors and the Medical Profession


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The "funny" thing is that people think the medical industry is different than other money-making industries. It isn't. I mean - sure it's regulated to a certain extent - but profit is the motive.

In the U.S. Not everywhere.

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yes, doctors are right down there with janitors, fruit pickers and walmart stockers.

 

Earnings 

Earnings of physicians and surgeons are among the highest of any occupation. The Medical Group Management Association’s Physician Compensation and Production Survey, reports that median total compensation for physicians in 2005 varied by specialty, as shown in table 2. Total compensation for physicians reflects the amount reported as direct compensation for tax purposes, plus all voluntary salary reductions. Salary, bonus and incentive payments, research stipends, honoraria, and distribution of profits were included in total compensation.

Table 2. Median compensation for physicians, 2005. 

Specialty     Less than two years in specialty     Over one year in specialty

Anesthesiology  $259,948     $321,686

Surgery: General 228,839     282,504

Obstetrics/gynecology: General 203,270     247,348

Psychiatry: General 173,922     180,000

Internal medicine: General 141,912     166,420

Pediatrics: General 132,953     161,331

Family practice (without obstetrics) 137,119     156,010

Footnotes:
(NOTE) Source: Medical Group Management Association, Physician Compensation and Production Report, 2005.

 

that's from the u.s department of labor.

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they're too busy counting their money to bother with spelling.

 

 

You really, really don't know much about the current state of the medical profession.

 

the current state of the medical profession is that some physicians make obscene amounts of money and some don't, no different than most professions. The real money is made by the private, for-profit hospital corporations that own dozens of hospitals and regional medical centers.

 

My legal practice is about 90% medical negligence. I have litigated hundreds of cases against hospitals and physicians. These are a few of my observations: First, the overwhelming majority of physicians are talented, knowledgeable, conscientious, and dedicated to their patients. Less than 5% of physicians are responsible for 50% of the medical malpractice claims filed. It is the classic example of a few bad apples spoiling the whole bunch. If physicians would simply police themselves more and get more aggressive in revoking the licenses of the few bad doctors, they could cut the number of medical malpractice cases in half overnight. That said, sometimes good doctors make a bad mistake. This is negligence and this is why they are insured. It's the same reason that we must have insurance to drive our cars. No matter how careful we are, accidents do happen, and the cost of the loss should be born by the one who caused it. The sad thing is that the insurance carriers who cover physicians are terrible. They rip-off the physicians with massive, unjustified premiums, and then blame it on frivolous lawsuits. The concept of getting a "frivolous lawsuit" all the way to a jury trial in a medical malpractice case is laughable. it just doesn't happen.

 

98,000 deaths result each year directly from preventable medical errors in the hospital setting. This is the equivalent to a fully loaded 737 airplane crashing everyday, yet there is no outcry to overhaul our nations hospitals. Most of the errors are systemic in nature rather than the fault of a single, negligent employee. Since hospitals were purchased by large, for profit, corporations revenues and profit margins have increased by cutting the bottom line. This is usually accomplished by cutting staff. Talk to any person who has been a nurse for 25 years or more, and than him/her tell how things are different on the floor now. It is staggering. The same is true with housekeeping staff. Hospitals are not as clean as they used to be. Hospital acquired infections are raging as a result.

 

Having done this work for as long as I have my conclusions are that most doctors are good, most hospitals are run too much like a business, and injured people should always have a right to recover their full damages if they are due to another's negligence.

 

 

Well Sir, bravo! People don't know shit. Of course you know, that for most things, there is always some innocent culprit convenient to blame. Again, people don't know shit.

 

 

EDIT

 

I'll add some more. I disdain the reluctance of the press to tell their readers, watchers, users and recipients of what they publish, that they are wrong, that they are being partial and that many in their audience, as a result, are myopic blabbermouths.

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In the bad hygiene category, at the risk of making more people angry, I have seen surgeons visit the cafeteria (and other parts of the hospital) after performing surgery, still wearing their operating room shoe covers. I observed this several times a week over the course of many years. Of course, I haven't worked in a medical center in the last 3 years, so hopefully they've really cracked down on it.

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yes, doctors are right down there with janitors, fruit pickers and walmart stockers.

 

Earnings 

Earnings of physicians and surgeons are among the highest of any occupation. The Medical Group Management Association’s Physician Compensation and Production Survey, reports that median total compensation for physicians in 2005 varied by specialty, as shown in table 2. Total compensation for physicians reflects the amount reported as direct compensation for tax purposes, plus all voluntary salary reductions. Salary, bonus and incentive payments, research stipends, honoraria, and distribution of profits were included in total compensation.

Table 2. Median compensation for physicians, 2005. 

Specialty     Less than two years in specialty     Over one year in specialty

Anesthesiology  $259,948     $321,686

Surgery: General 228,839     282,504

Obstetrics/gynecology: General 203,270     247,348

Psychiatry: General 173,922     180,000

Internal medicine: General 141,912     166,420

Pediatrics: General 132,953     161,331

Family practice (without obstetrics) 137,119     156,010

Footnotes:
(NOTE) Source: Medical Group Management Association, Physician Compensation and Production Report, 2005.

 

that's from the u.s department of labor.

 

Subtract malpractice premiums and they're left with...and not to mention the debt from opening a practice or buying into one, student loans...

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In the bad hygiene category, at the risk of making more people angry, I have seen surgeons visit the cafeteria (and other parts of the hospital) after performing surgery, still wearing their operating room shoe covers. I observed this several times a week over the course of many years. Of course, I haven't worked in a medical center in the last 3 years, so hopefully they've really cracked down on it.

 

 

Imagine that, less than perfectly behaved professionals. Shocking.

 

 

 

 

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In the bad hygiene category, at the risk of making more people angry, I have seen surgeons visit the cafeteria (and other parts of the hospital) after performing surgery, still wearing their operating room shoe covers. I observed this several times a week over the course of many years. Of course, I haven't worked in a medical center in the last 3 years, so hopefully they've really cracked down on it.

 

 

Imagine that, less than perfectly behaved professionals. Shocking.

There's a big difference between stealing post-it notes and spreading bacteria all over the hospital when it can be prevented.

 

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anecdotes should not make the case. It is a disgrace that insurance companies have such a large say in the manner Docs treat their patients. Who is the doctor? My long time doctor told me today of one cardiac patient with one very modern pacemaker (those that are pacemakers and defibrilators), that had suffered four or five heart attacks to which he prescribed a certain very new drug at a certain dosage. The patient's insurance company faxed my doctor a letter asking him to justify the dosage.

 

My doctor who was justifiedly insulted ( but not really)

answered:

 

1. Because I am the patient's doctor

2. Medically, this is a cardiac patient with several heart attacks and who could have a fatal one at any time, he should not take various drugs, if something happens to him, you, insurance company, will be responsible for it. After that (and this is so stupid), dosage approved.

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yes, doctors are right down there with janitors, fruit pickers and walmart stockers.

 

Earnings 

Earnings of physicians and surgeons are among the highest of any occupation. The Medical Group Management Association’s Physician Compensation and Production Survey, reports that median total compensation for physicians in 2005 varied by specialty, as shown in table 2. Total compensation for physicians reflects the amount reported as direct compensation for tax purposes, plus all voluntary salary reductions. Salary, bonus and incentive payments, research stipends, honoraria, and distribution of profits were included in total compensation.

Table 2. Median compensation for physicians, 2005. 

Specialty     Less than two years in specialty     Over one year in specialty

Anesthesiology  $259,948     $321,686

Surgery: General 228,839     282,504

Obstetrics/gynecology: General 203,270     247,348

Psychiatry: General 173,922     180,000

Internal medicine: General 141,912     166,420

Pediatrics: General 132,953     161,331

Family practice (without obstetrics) 137,119     156,010

Footnotes:
(NOTE) Source: Medical Group Management Association, Physician Compensation and Production Report, 2005.

 

that's from the u.s department of labor.

 

Subtract malpractice premiums and they're left with...and not to mention the debt from opening a practice or buying into one, student loans...

 

yes, it's no wonder they're all running illegal kidney rackets on the side. it's hard to pay down the mortgages on those tiny studios they live in, and to pay for gas for their 20 year old tercels.

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It takes a doctor a long damn time to get to those high salaries. You can be in a residency for up to 6 years, and then maybe a fellowship after that, and you're making less than 40K.

 

Yep.

 

And I repeat:

 

 

Subtract malpractice premiums and they're left with...and not to mention the debt from opening a practice or buying into one, student loans...

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