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As I posted earlier, at least 200,000 people die from mistakes in treatment in hospitals every year. 200,000 and that is believed to be an underestimate. This has been happening for more than 15 years. I saw such figures over 12 years ago. That comes to more than 3 million people-dead, due to treatment errors. Imagine if fifteen jumbo jets crashed daily each with 300 deaths, all due to pilot error. How long would it be before something were done to stop and fix the problem. Why is nothing being done about this?

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As I posted earlier, at least 200,000 people die from mistakes in treatment in hospitals every year. 200,000 and that is believed to be an underestimate. This has been happening for more than 15 years. I saw such figures over 12 years ago. That comes to more than 3 million people-dead, due to treatment errors. Imagine if fifteen jumbo jets crashed daily each with 300 deaths, all due to pilot error. How long would it be before something were done to stop and fix the problem. Why is nothing being done about this?

Sorry to be, er, a realist, but most of those would have died anyway, but maybe not quite so soon. Wrong drugs to elderly people....not quick enough treatment for pneumonia....

 

Of course someone tell me I'm wrong if they know better.

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I remember reading about some 2 million deaths annually from hospital-contracted infections in the US.

 

Yep, here: link

 

1. Infections contracted in hospitals are the fourth largest killer in America. Every year in this country, two million patients' contract infections in hospitals, and an estimated 103,000 die as a result, as many deaths as from AIDS, breast cancer, and auto accidents combined.

 

(eta: not a response to yvonne, we just posted at the same time.)

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I remember reading about some 2 million deaths annually from hospital-contracted infections in the US.

 

Yep, here: link

 

1. Infections contracted in hospitals are the fourth largest killer in America. Every year in this country, two million patients' contract infections in hospitals, and an estimated 103,000 die as a result, as many deaths as from AIDS, breast cancer, and auto accidents combined.

I don't think that article gives the average age of those who died. They were probably sick and old. Don't want to be ageist or anything, but it's a fact: most were terminally ill, I'd guess. It isn't the case you enter a hospital reasonably healthy and die--that's the exception.

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I don't think that article gives the average age of those who died. They were probably sick and old. Don't want to be ageist or anything, but it's a fact. Most were terminally ill, I'd guess. It isn't the case you enter a hospital reasonably healthy and die--that's the exception.

 

Sorry, the original article I read implied that the rate in the US was much higher than in other developed countries, but I couldn't remember where I'd seen it. At the risk of pulling a Nathan, it was here in slate. Looking it over again, it gives the rates of infection in Dutch (1%) and Canadian (10%) hospitals, and implies that these are better numbers, but I don't see where it gives the US rates. I might be missing it, I should be doing something else.

 

An anecdote that proves nothing at all though -- a good friend of ours who is a doctor in germany was completely (and very vocally) horrified during his visit to see Penn med stiudents standing outside at the campus lunch trucks in their scrubs. In Germany it is illegal.

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As I posted earlier, at least 200,000 people die from mistakes in treatment in hospitals every year. 200,000 and that is believed to be an underestimate. This has been happening for more than 15 years. I saw such figures over 12 years ago. That comes to more than 3 million people-dead, due to treatment errors. Imagine if fifteen jumbo jets crashed daily each with 300 deaths, all due to pilot error. How long would it be before something were done to stop and fix the problem. Why is nothing being done about this?

That quote about jumbo jets, where does it come from?

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As I posted earlier, at least 200,000 people die from mistakes in treatment in hospitals every year. 200,000 and that is believed to be an underestimate. This has been happening for more than 15 years. I saw such figures over 12 years ago. That comes to more than 3 million people-dead, due to treatment errors. Imagine if fifteen jumbo jets crashed daily each with 300 deaths, all due to pilot error. How long would it be before something were done to stop and fix the problem. Why is nothing being done about this?

Without some background information this doesn't mean a whole lot to me.

 

That isn't to say that I have my head in the sand. I'm certain people die because of treatment errors by doctors. Managing patient care in the modern world can be very difficult and there are many ways in which errors can be made.

 

Plus I think your jumbo jet math is wrong.

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I don't think that article gives the average age of those who died. They were probably sick and old. Don't want to be ageist or anything, but it's a fact. Most were terminally ill, I'd guess. It isn't the case you enter a hospital reasonably healthy and die--that's the exception.

 

Sorry, the original article I read implied that the rate in the US was much higher than in other developed countries, but I couldn't remember where I'd seen it. At the risk of pulling a Nathan, it was here in slate. Looking it over again, it gives the rates of infection in Dutch (1%) and Canadian (10%) hospitals, and implies that these are better numbers, but I don't see where it gives the US rates. I might be missing it, I should be doing something else.

 

An anecdote that proves nothing at all though -- a good friend of ours who is a doctor in germany was completely (and very vocally) horrified during his visit to see Penn med stiudents standing outside at the campus lunch trucks in their scrubs. In Germany it is illegal.

Interesting point about the 'scrubs', b/c I've noticed an increase in # of people traveling to and fro work in nurses' and junior MD ware but no-one seems to be worried about the community-hospital contamination rates.

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If I worked in a medical facility, I wouldn't want to bring home and launder my uniform. Do you think these people have the option to change and have their scrubs laundered? Or is this a cost-cutting issue for non-surgical personnel?

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If I worked in a medical facility, I wouldn't want to bring home and launder my uniform. Do you think these people have the option to change and have their scrubs laundered? Or is this a cost-cutting issue for non-surgical personnel?
=

Don 't wash your scrubs at home. They have to be washed at a very high temp (not usually reached at home).

 

I think you need a UNION.

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When we took Jack to visit his aunt in hospital, we were told to take him out of the ward immediately. In Ireland. Made sense, he was two.

 

G & Y Johnson know I'm the daughter of an oncologist, who is now passionately involved in palliative care. The doctors I grew up with worked hard, and saved my life with what was breakthrough surgery in 1971. Who else would I turn to then, and now?

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