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Melonious Thunk

Eating in Merida

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I'll pass that along to my friend.

 

LOL!

 

I've never been but I'd consider him lucky. It's supposed to be beautiful.

I think the food is typical of the Yucatan. I don't have any books specific to Merida but Lonley Planet's World Food: Mexico had this:

 

2296708961_a610260096_o.jpg

 

I'm jealous.

 

[self-edited to save the admins the trouble of asking me. ]

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I loved Merida -- among other things, it must be the most musical city I've ever been to (it almost seemed like a real-life version of Wagner's fantasy Nurenburg, where amateur musicians are hero-worshiped and brides are awarded for musical skill) -- but I had a hard time finding good food there.

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I've been to Merida, but it's been 15 years and I honestly don't remember much of what I ate and nothing stands out except for some street food (panuchos, salbutes) in the square outside our hotel. That said, Merida was an interesting city with a wonderful market place and a town square that came to life on Sunday afternoon with families strolling and many street vendors selling snacks. Seems to have a reputation of not being much of a food city, but I'm sure there's good food, it's just finding it and sifting out the touristic drek that's the problem. We had excellent food in the city of Valladolid, but that's quite a few miles down the road on the way to Cancun.

 

Here are a couple of references that might be helpful:

 

CH Thread

 

Yucatan Today

 

Article in Yucatecan Living

 

Food and Baseball in Merida - probably not helpful for your friend, interesting anyway.

 

On a side note, unless your friend is fearless and speaks really good Spanish, I'd recommend not driving in Merida if at all possible. The streets are confusing and the police direct traffic, often against the lights, in the downtown area. We were pulled over multiple times on our first evening for missing their signals and had to pay multiple mordidas (little bites, or bribes). We were looking for our hotel and kept driving in circles. When we finally ran out of pesos to pay them, (probably about 15.00 US total), one of the officers good naturedly got in the car with us and showed us where to go. Funny now, a bit harrowing at the time. We parked the car in the garage (which was fairly expensive) and didn't use it again until we left town to drive back to the Cancun airport. Next time, I'd arrange the trip to drop off the car at the Merida airport and take a taxi into town.

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I loved Merida -- among other things, it must be the most musical city I've ever been to (it almost seemed like a real-life version of Wagner's fantasy Nurenburg, where amateur musicians are hero-worshiped and brides are awarded for musical skill) -- but I had a hard time finding good food there.

 

I thought Guanajuato was the most musical city I've been to (go there in October or November for the musical festivals), and I've been to Mérida many times. I had a hard time finding good food In Oaxaca, but I had a hard time finding bad food in Mérida. I tended to go to Lebanese restaurants, of which there were many. I also like Cochinita Pibil or any of the Pibil style dishes, and I frequently cook with achiote paste myself, to remind me of the Yucatan.

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I loved Merida -- among other things, it must be the most musical city I've ever been to (it almost seemed like a real-life version of Wagner's fantasy Nurenburg, where amateur musicians are hero-worshiped and brides are awarded for musical skill) -- but I had a hard time finding good food there.

Was here on business for a couple of days. It's incredible how bad of a food city it is.

 

kuuk is nice, but that's about it. From how locals discuss food it seems like the most important factors are not getting cholera, and easy parking.

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It should be made clear that it's especially odd that Merida isn't a good food city when Yucatecan food is so good.

 

Just not there.

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It should be made clear that it's especially odd that Merida isn't a good food city when Yucatecan food is so good.

 

Just not there.

The few residents who can afford to eat out have cooks at home, and everyone else just wants cheap, cheap, cheap, so the flour, masa, pernil, and turkey industrial complex is optimized for that. (And when you see the municipal market, which looks like it's dipped in dung on a nightly basis, you can see where the cholera aversion comes from.)

 

 

At Holbox, on the other hand, everything is better than it needs to be.

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