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This is an example of the use of 'Chef' for the purposes of disambiguation -- in this case of the Pslatis twins; one chef and one publicist. Or perhaps it's irony. Or maybe both.

 

And I am a turnip.

 

You mean 'twat', surely?

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Not that this isn't fascinating, but can we address (1) the zip code +4; and whether to abbreviate the state in the address on a formal business letter?

use of both the zip +4 and the approved state abbreviation will help to speed your business letter through the postal system, if you believe their marketing.

I hear that only cunts and twats use Zip +4.

 

(Edit: Sorry, carry on your discussion.)

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The Professor just twatted himself:

 

http://mouthfulsfood.com/forums//index.php...mp;#entry921652

 

Mix: Shaw, whose literary agent was Chef Psaltis's twin brother, thought it the funnest thing in the universe. Everyone else hated it. Psaltis was fired soon after and the place closed within a couple of years.

The most concise way of saying what I said, I think. I could, I suppose, have said "whose literary agent was Psaltis the chef's, twin brother" or should it have been "Psalitis's, the chef's, twin brother"? Inelegant in either case, surely.

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The Professor just twatted himself:

 

http://mouthfulsfood.com/forums//index.php...mp;#entry921652

 

Mix: Shaw, whose literary agent was Chef Psaltis's twin brother, thought it the funnest thing in the universe. Everyone else hated it. Psaltis was fired soon after and the place closed within a couple of years.

The most concise way of saying what I said, I think. I could, I suppose, have said "whose literary agent was Psaltis the chef's, twin brother" or should it have been "Psalitis's, the chef's, twin brother"? Inelegant in either case, surely.

I don't think there's any danger of Ssam Bar closing soon. For the record, let's see how successful of some of the restaurants that Shaw has extravagently praised.

 

Mix: Shaw, whose literary agent was Chef Psaltis's twin brother, thought it the funnest thing in the universe. Everyone else hated it. Psaltis was fired soon after and the place closed within a couple of years.

 

Bid: Utterly wonderful according to Shaw whose friend Seeber was the chef. It closed in less than a year and Seeber was fired.

 

ADNY under Delouvrier: The best restaurant in NYC according to Shaw. Very mixed according to everyone else. Demoted to three stars and Delouvrier fired soon after.

 

ADNY under Esnault: For Shaw, still the best restaurant in NYC. Now closed.

 

Grammercy Tavern: The best American restaurant when his friend Seeber was cooking there. Still successful but more a tourist destination than anything else.

 

Otto: Shaw wanted Batali to do an eGullet Q&A so the ingredients were ineffable and the "Sardinian style" pizza was a masterstroke. Everyone else thought the pizza tasted like cardboard. A success with young families but everyone else goes only for the gelati.

 

He might as well disclose. As a shill be's obviously crap.

He doesn't refer to any other chef as chef.

 

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And yet people refer to chefs as Chef Whatever in writing very frequently (just as they refer to Doctor Whatever). So there are variations in usage among different forms of address.

 

It doesn't follow - how could it? - that a diner addressing a chef as "chef" is - what? - unheard of? Inappropriate? Rude?

 

The usage of honorifics in writing (and in particular journalistic writing) obviously differs from usage in casual conversation.

 

I'm not making a case here one way or the other, just observing that there's little in common between why (and when) Doctor Doctor is referred to as Dr. Doctor Doctor and when Chef Joe is referred to as Chef.

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And yet people refer to chefs as Chef Whatever in writing very frequently

[LML]Only twats.[/LML]

Google it. Choose your chef and google it. From the New York Times to the BBC.

 

There is no point pretending usage is other than it is.

 

example

 

example

 

example

 

:lol: :lol: :lol: Only for Ramsay it would be "Effing Chef, sir." Would anyone like to explain the difference between a twat and a hoi poloi, in a general, stereotypical sense, please?

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The Professor just twatted himself:

 

http://mouthfulsfood.com/forums//index.php...mp;#entry921652

 

Mix: Shaw, whose literary agent was Chef Psaltis's twin brother, thought it the funnest thing in the universe. Everyone else hated it. Psaltis was fired soon after and the place closed within a couple of years.

The most concise way of saying what I said, I think. I could, I suppose, have said "whose literary agent was Psaltis the chef's, twin brother" or should it have been "Psalitis's, the chef's, twin brother"? Inelegant in either case, surely.

I don't think there's any danger of Ssam Bar closing soon. For the record, let's see how successful of some of the restaurants that Shaw has extravagently praised.

 

Mix: Shaw, whose literary agent was Chef Psaltis's twin brother, thought it the funnest thing in the universe. Everyone else hated it. Psaltis was fired soon after and the place closed within a couple of years.

 

Bid: Utterly wonderful according to Shaw whose friend Seeber was the chef. It closed in less than a year and Seeber was fired.

 

ADNY under Delouvrier: The best restaurant in NYC according to Shaw. Very mixed according to everyone else. Demoted to three stars and Delouvrier fired soon after.

 

ADNY under Esnault: For Shaw, still the best restaurant in NYC. Now closed.

 

Grammercy Tavern: The best American restaurant when his friend Seeber was cooking there. Still successful but more a tourist destination than anything else.

 

Otto: Shaw wanted Batali to do an eGullet Q&A so the ingredients were ineffable and the "Sardinian style" pizza was a masterstroke. Everyone else thought the pizza tasted like cardboard. A success with young families but everyone else goes only for the gelati.

 

He might as well disclose. As a shill be's obviously crap.

He doesn't refer to any other chef as chef.

Bloody hell, neither I did. I only have 1/9 twat rating. I'll take that.

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And yet people refer to chefs as Chef Whatever in writing very frequently (just as they refer to Doctor Whatever). So there are variations in usage among different forms of address.

 

It doesn't follow - how could it? - that a diner addressing a chef as "chef" is - what? - unheard of? Inappropriate? Rude?

 

The usage of honorifics in writing (and in particular journalistic writing) obviously differs from usage in casual conversation.

 

I agree. We are in the throes of a typical internet debate where one is put to the task of proving something is true (that the honorific is commonly used in writing) to people who actually know it's true (and use it themselves), but are concerned that they might give up something important by conceding it.

 

It's not difficult in principle to establish that it's long been used in conversation; only difficult in practice, because examples over a period of time are hard to find unless one is actually in a library (which I am not).

 

I'm not making a case here one way or the other, just observing that there's little in common between why (and when) Doctor Doctor is referred to as Dr. Doctor Doctor and when Chef Joe is referred to as Chef.

 

There are differences, clearly. But Chef Joe is referred to as Chef for all that, and not uncommoncly.

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Aren't we talking about talking to a chef to his/her face? And addressing them 'chef'? I thought that was the whole point of the discussion.

That's where we were, but when I asserted that the title was commonly used in writing, that too was denied - or rather, it was implied that only twats used it in writing.

 

(Inexplicable, I know, but this is the internet.)

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And yet people refer to chefs as Chef Whatever in writing very frequently (just as they refer to Doctor Whatever). So there are variations in usage among different forms of address.

 

It doesn't follow - how could it? - that a diner addressing a chef as "chef" is - what? - unheard of? Inappropriate? Rude?

 

The usage of honorifics in writing (and in particular journalistic writing) obviously differs from usage in casual conversation.

 

I agree. We are in the throes of a typical internet debate where one is put to the task of proving something is true (that the honorific is commonly used in writing) to people who actually know it's true (and use it themselves), but are concerned that they might give up something important by conceding it.

I am concerned that on the basis of writing Chef X or whatever somewhere that it would be assumed that I'd say, "Chef" in addressing a chef in conversation. I've never done so and I've never heard G address the chef as 'chef'.

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