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All the kind sentiments are appreciated.

 

Here's a question I've been puzzling over. Our area has for a long time has had a large population of ring necked doves (similar to mourning doves). Their cooing is quite loud and noticeable, especially in the morning.

 

On my first early morning walk after the hurricane, I couldn't get over how quiet it was after the storm. It finally dawned on me that one of the main reasons was the absence of the cooing by the doves. They were all gone.

 

Were these doves literally blown away by the cyclone? Or did they have a premonition and leave of their own accord? Where are they now? Will the same birds come back (actually, I hope not)?

 

Premonition implies the kind of cognitive processes I doubt the doves possess. Animals have different sensory perceptions than we do, so I wouldn't be surprised if they sensed an alarming change in the environment and instinctively fled. There have been plenty of documented cases of animals acting oddly before, say, an earthquake.

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All the kind sentiments are appreciated.

 

Here's a question I've been puzzling over. Our area has for a long time has had a large population of ring necked doves (similar to mourning doves). Their cooing is quite loud and noticeable, especially in the morning.

 

On my first early morning walk after the hurricane, I couldn't get over how quiet it was after the storm. It finally dawned on me that one of the main reasons was the absence of the cooing by the doves. They were all gone.

 

Were these doves literally blown away by the cyclone? Or did they have a premonition and leave of their own accord? Where are they now? Will the same birds come back (actually, I hope not)?

 

Have you tried using 18 guage light load shotgun shells filled with 11 herbs and spices?

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As most of the meat on a pigeon is on the breasts you don't need to clean the bird (or even pluck it), just cut the breasts off. Of course, if you insist on the whole bird you'll have to do the cleaning as well as the killing.

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Southeastern Texas is really a mess. My daughter & son-in-law decided to decamp up to Lexington (where his parents live) the day after the storm because they have a newborn and didn't want to deal with what might be weeks with no power or water. Their water and power got turned back on yesterday, so they got into the car and tried to get back into Houston.

 

But by Brenham, they gave up and turned around. The roads were littered with debris, and packed with thousands of other cars also trying to do the same thing. The gas stations were out of gasoline, soft drinks, water, ice. With their tank a little less than half-full, they knew they could get back to Lexington, but weren't sure they could get all the way to Houston. Especially not if they had to do a lot of stop and go driving on a highway that was basically one massive traffic jam.

 

You know, the photos of luxury condominiums and beach houses and expensive yachts beached in what were manicured yards has really hidden the high cost of this devastation for ordinary folk. There definitely are areas where the damage has reached Katrina proportions, in both the material and the human toll.

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(I personally think that the worst thing about MF is the numerous complaints admins get that they didn't act fast enough when a problem emerges... as an admin you're damned if you do, damned if you don't. Seems to me that a few friendly reminders sure beat admins having to ask for posts to be altered and the ensuing falderol after tempers flare :blink: )

 

I suggest that the Hurricane Ike discussion be split (or moved) into a new thread that isn't in the wine section... just so people don't miss it.

I agree, I was totally missing this information until Jaymes gave me a heads up this morning. Thanks Jaymes. I miss having you as a neighbor somewhat close by.

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Peter and Jaymes, I am glad you are safe and am sorry for the devastation and loss to your area, including your homes. I was heartened to read about the excellent response of Lowes, which I would have not known about had I not read it here... thanks.

 

 

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Peter and Jaymes, I am glad you are safe and am sorry for the devastation and loss to your area, including your homes. I was heartened to read about the excellent response of Lowes, which I would have not known about had I not read it here... thanks.

 

Actually, I don't know if it's just that "Texas spirit" to which a lot of folks are attributing it or what, but there are a lot of people, organizations, stores, churches, neighborhoods, etc., pitching in to get things up and running. There has been some considerable comment in the local newspaper about it, observing that the haves are sharing with the have-nots and that most people are behaving pretty patiently and responsibly. It's been noted that even in the hardest-hit communities where homes were scraped clean and only the foundations remain, and the land was scoured so thoroughly by the surge that you can see the tops of the sceptic tanks, we're not seeing photos of people running through the streets carrying looted televisions and cases of liquor. Supposedly only fewer than a dozen have been arrested and overall crime has been down throughout the Houston/Galveston/Boliver area and, as one newspaper columnist put it, "driving through devastated neighborhoods, you see more people working to clean up the mess than you see standing in their front yards whining about somebody coming to help them."

 

One thing that longtime Galvestonians are really lamenting is the loss of the famed Balinese Room. It was built out over a pier, long and narrow. The original purpose was to facilitate various illegal activities - gambling, boozing and the like - because it was easy to see law enforcement arriving. Many of Texas' more infamous legends and characters involve the Balinese Room and it is a loss for sure. There were several other businesses on piers in that area - a gift shop, a Hooters. Gone with nothing left but poles sticking up "like suddenly empty fingers" as one reporter put it.

 

here's how one Galvestonian recently put it: "My mother-in-law’s father and grandfather worked at the Balinese Room. The Balinese Room was home to illegal gambling and many raids by the Texas Rangers. Mr. Franklin was one of the runners; upon arrival of any law enforcement, he would run down the hallway to the ball room, alert the guests and help flip tables in order to conceal the gambling. According to the website a former employee said, 'the Balinese was raided on 64 consecutive nights without a single bust.' It was shut down in 1957 and re-opened in 2002 (without the gambling, I guess)."

 

One of the most famous raids by the Rangers was under the cover of darkness from the Gulf by boat. I think that was the time they finally got busted.

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