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Daisy

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Recently I have had occasion to cut through Madison Square Park several times and I am struck by how nicely the Mark di Suvero sculptures currently installed (through the end of October) work in these surroundings. The park shows these pieces to great advantage.

 

Today, walking through Rockefeller Plaza, I got my first look at Jonathan Borofsky's Walking to the Sky. If what I observed is any indicator, this piece certainly is engaging the public---people taking pictures, touching it, posing like one of the figures. It may sound strange to say this about something so big, but this piece is relatively subdued compared to some fairly Recent Rock Center installations: Murakami's "Mr. Pointy" pieces and Koons' Puppy spring to mind.

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The Borofsky takes less volume than the puppy or Mr. Pointy; it's less of an imposition. Still, I'm having a certain amount of trouble seeing the enduring artfulness in some of these pieces. Every time I look at the Borofsky, I hear "It's a small world after all" in my head.

 

edit: I'm a big fan of DeSuvero, a wonderful artist in my view.

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Agreed. Love Di Suvero's work. Don't love the Borofsky. Didn't love the Murakami---it was fun and cute and all but all I could think of were those Vuitton handbags. I did oddly enough like Puppy. Not usually a fan of Koons.

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I find the Borofsky piece terribly uninteresting. It's momentarily diverting to notice the way in which real passersby strike poses, looking up, which make them seem part of the work. But there's really nothing to look at, and it evokes too many instantly obvious "concepts" or "ideas". It lacks mystery.

 

Now, which subway station is it (or is there more than one?) which boasts those infinitely engaging little metal statues of toffs, frogs, construction workers, and so on?

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Lack of mystery - lack of much of anything beyond what you see - seems to be a hallmark of the art-'tainment school of large scale sculpture. Not surprisingly, it is sucked up by lazy collectors with more money than taste or discipline.

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. Not surprisingly, it is sucked up by lazy collectors with more money than taste or discipline.

And homes with extensive grounds. :D

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Now, which subway station is it (or is there more than one?) which boasts those infinitely engaging little metal statues of toffs, frogs, construction workers, and so on?

Is that Tom Otterness? Is it somewhere in the Grand Central complex?

 

Canal Street on the E line has ravens.

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Tom Otterness' work is in the 14th st. A/E station at 8th ave.He also has some nice work in the Hudson River park near Chambers street,and there is a temporary installation of statues at various points along the Broadway median on the upper left side.There was an article about him in the city section of this past weeks' Sunday Times.I'm also a fan of some of the Subway mosaics.The eyeballs at Bowling Green and Chambers Street are my faves...

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I came across the Otterness pieces at 8th Ave. recently - what a nice surprise.

 

Subway mosaics: I like the whale in the water-filled subway car at Houston St. (1 or 9), and all the animals at the Museum of Natural History stop on CPW.

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There are Otterness sculptures in the East River along the western edge of Roosevelt Island that are fully revealed only at low tide.

 

The Borofsky piece reminds me of an effect created by the WTC at night. If you stood at a corner and looked up the edge of the building, (and moved around to make the illusion work) it looked as if there were a path to the moon.

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Thanks for clearing up the subway station point, wingding. I ought to have got that right, because that's where we regularly change from the L when heading to the UWS.

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Thanks for clearing up the subway station point, wingding. I ought to have got that right, because that's where we regularly change from the L when heading to the UWS.

There is also an otterness piece on 42nd st. - I think it's betw. 7th and 8th, at the Hilton Times Square, so you weren't that far off.

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It's Fire Prevention Week over at Rock Center, and one of the trucks parked there with its ladder extended offers a host of new visual references for the Borofsky. Much more interesting now.

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It's Fire Prevention Week over at Rock Center, and one of the trucks parked there with its ladder extended offers a host of new visual references for the Borofsky. Much more interesting now.

I love that intersection of art and life.

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