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Giving the price with recited "specials"


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Do you order blindly, gambling that the bill will not trigger indigestion and your credit card limit? Or do you take a deep breath and ask the prices, at the risk of seeming like Scrooge or a battered Wall Street investor?

 

That familiar dining dilemma would end under a proposed Nassau County law that would require restaurants to divulge the prices of specials not listed on menus.

 

“I’m sure that at one time or another you have been enticed by a waiter or waitress into ordering the special of the day, only to discover that it was really the price that was special,” said the proposal’s originator, Harvey B. Levinson, chairman of Nassau County’s Board of Assessors. Mr. Levinson does not regulate restaurants, but he discussed his pet peeve with other officials.

 

David W. Denenberg, a county legislator and fellow Democrat, sponsored the legislation. “The special of the day should not be the surprise of the day in terms of price,” he said.

 

The legislature’s presiding officer, Diane Yatauro, said she thought the proposal would pass.

 

Nassau County NY leads the way

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Do you order blindly, gambling that the bill will not trigger indigestion and your credit card limit? Or do you take a deep breath and ask the prices, at the risk of seeming like Scrooge or a battered Wall Street investor?

 

That familiar dining dilemma would end under a proposed Nassau County law that would require restaurants to divulge the prices of specials not listed on menus.

 

“I’m sure that at one time or another you have been enticed by a waiter or waitress into ordering the special of the day, only to discover that it was really the price that was special,” said the proposal’s originator, Harvey B. Levinson, chairman of Nassau County’s Board of Assessors. Mr. Levinson does not regulate restaurants, but he discussed his pet peeve with other officials.

 

David W. Denenberg, a county legislator and fellow Democrat, sponsored the legislation. “The special of the day should not be the surprise of the day in terms of price,” he said.

 

The legislature’s presiding officer, Diane Yatauro, said she thought the proposal would pass.

 

Nassau County NY leads the way

 

Next, they'll propose a bill that will force the server to say "You know, the special is just what we cleaned out of the walk-in or didn't sell in private dining last night. For $12."

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Do you order blindly, gambling that the bill will not trigger indigestion and your credit card limit? Or do you take a deep breath and ask the prices, at the risk of seeming like Scrooge or a battered Wall Street investor?

 

That familiar dining dilemma would end under a proposed Nassau County law that would require restaurants to divulge the prices of specials not listed on menus.

 

“I’m sure that at one time or another you have been enticed by a waiter or waitress into ordering the special of the day, only to discover that it was really the price that was special,” said the proposal’s originator, Harvey B. Levinson, chairman of Nassau County’s Board of Assessors. Mr. Levinson does not regulate restaurants, but he discussed his pet peeve with other officials.

 

David W. Denenberg, a county legislator and fellow Democrat, sponsored the legislation. “The special of the day should not be the surprise of the day in terms of price,” he said.

 

The legislature’s presiding officer, Diane Yatauro, said she thought the proposal would pass.

 

Nassau County NY leads the way

 

Next, they'll propose a bill that will force the server to say "You know, the special is just what we cleaned out of the walk-in or didn't sell in private dining last night. For $12."

 

The article mentions that several jurisdictions are considering laws which would require the written disclosure of nuts and other potentially dangerous items in any food preparation. Peanut oil is one target, of course.

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It seems silly to have a law on this, but can you imagine going into a store for a pair of socks and asking for the price, only to have the clerk tell you that you will find out only after the sale is made at the register? It is a bit weird to play hide the price like that.

 

"I like this car, how much does it cost?"

 

"We'll tell you how much it costs after you buy it."

 

:blink: :unsure:

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It seems silly to have a law on this, but can you imagine going into a store for a pair of socks and asking for the price, only to have the clerk tell you that you will find out only after the sale is made at the register? It is a bit weird to play hide the price like that.

 

"I like this car, how much does it cost?"

 

"We'll tell you how much it costs after you buy it."

 

:blink: :unsure:

The fact that the price of some specials is significantly higher that the prices of regular menu choices can't be an accident. The restaurants are counting on the idea that some people think it's tacky to ask about prices.

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I think the waiters at Sammy's Roumanian should recite the prices whether on the menu or not, and the calories.

 

"Roumanian tenderloin, $75, 4000 calories; breaded $85, 5500 calories; add a vegetable $110, 7000 calories; a side of karnatzlach, $26, 2000 calories; a bottle of vodka $495, comes with ice, glasses, etc."

 

 

 

NB: The above figures are for satirical purposes only and do not purport to represent the actual cost or calorie-burden of a pleasant dinner at Sammy's.

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Do you order blindly, gambling that the bill will not trigger indigestion and your credit card limit? Or do you take a deep breath and ask the prices, at the risk of seeming like Scrooge or a battered Wall Street investor?

 

That familiar dining dilemma would end under a proposed Nassau County law that would require restaurants to divulge the prices of specials not listed on menus.

 

“I’m sure that at one time or another you have been enticed by a waiter or waitress into ordering the special of the day, only to discover that it was really the price that was special,” said the proposal’s originator, Harvey B. Levinson, chairman of Nassau County’s Board of Assessors. Mr. Levinson does not regulate restaurants, but he discussed his pet peeve with other officials.

 

David W. Denenberg, a county legislator and fellow Democrat, sponsored the legislation. “The special of the day should not be the surprise of the day in terms of price,” he said.

 

The legislature’s presiding officer, Diane Yatauro, said she thought the proposal would pass.

 

Nassau County NY leads the way

 

Next, they'll propose a bill that will force the server to say "You know, the special is just what we cleaned out of the walk-in or didn't sell in private dining last night. For $12."

 

The article mentions that several jurisdictions are considering laws which would require the written disclosure of nuts and other potentially dangerous items in any food preparation. Peanut oil is one target, of course.

this would be more helpful than calorie counts

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Let me get this right - When you go for a meal out you decide on what you want according to the price alongside it?

Sad to say, yes. Not only in terms of which entree to order, but also whether or not to get an appetizer. I generally keep myself on a pretty tight budget.

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Let me get this right - When you go for a meal out you decide on what you want according to the price alongside it?

Sad to say, yes. Not only in terms of which entree to order, but also whether or not to get an appetizer. I generally keep myself on a pretty tight budget.

I couldn't be bothered to eat out if that was the case; I can eat cheaper and usually as good as, if not better, at home.

 

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