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The surrealism of everyday life


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17 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

(And certainly David's Brisket House doesn't.

(If there's anyone who knows how to run an authentic deli, it's Yemenites.)

Seriously, I thought David's was now owned by Latinos.

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We have threads for annoyances and what made us cheerful, but then there's those weird things that happen.....   My workplace is particularly fertile ground for the surreal. 2 current examples:

Yeah, me too.   As soon as I'm a real member, I'll upload a real avatar.   Or did you mean my sig?

You talkin' to me?

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22 hours ago, bloviatrix said:

In Kashruth, food is one of 4 categories - Meat and Dairy are self-explanatory. But then you have Pareve which is neutral and can be used with either. Fruits, vegetables, grains, are all pareve. Fish is pareve. However, the tradition is not to mix it with meat and if served at the same meal as meat you use separate plates and cutlery. The fourth category is, of course, Bacon, which is eaten while feeling extreme guilt (kidding).

Right.  So any deli that serves Reubens may be "kosher style", but not certified kosher.  Certified kosher restaurants can be meat or dairy, but not both.

BTW, as I posted some months back, this is a great history of the Jewish dairy restaurant: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/90039/the-dairy-restaurant-by-ben-katchor/

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Right.  But the vast majority of delis in America are Kosher-style, not Kosher.  And the vast majority of deli patrons in America don't care whether a deli is actually Kosher or not (except to the extent that they want their Reubens and other cheese sandwiches, and maybe think non-Kosher meat tends to be tastier).

And even what is probably the most famous actually Kosher deli in this country -- Second Avenue -- serves appetizing, but with fake cream cheese.  Because, I guess, the current market expects appetizing at an Ashkenazic Jewish restaurant -- even if the traditional definition of delicatessen excludes it.

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Just as you can get corned beef and pastrami sandwiches at Barney Greengrass, an appetizing specialist.  (We can congratulate Russ & Daughters for maintaining the distinction.)

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To be clear, I’m not saying there’s no difference between deli and appetizing.  Of course there is.

I’m just saying that you can’t definitively declare that a place “isn’t a deli” if it also serves appetizing.  Just about every famous deli you can think of does — including some Kosher ones. 

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13 minutes ago, Sneakeater said:

Have you ever been to Gottlieb’s?   I’ve always found it kind of frightening (just like Moe Wilensky’s in Montreal). 

God forbid.  But Mill Basin Kosher is possibly my favorite for the deli experience, and you’re right about that!

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I'm not quite sure what came over me, but I decided to polish some of my silver tonight - My shabbat candlesticks were obscenely tarnished as were some picture frames. And I while I was at it, I polished up a brass tray that belonged to my great-grandmother, that I use under my candlesticks, that I don't think has been polished in several decades. 

I despise polishing silver (it was my bi-weekly pre-shabbat chore as a kid) but I feel as if I had a good workout.

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