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The surrealism of everyday life


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6 hours ago, bloviatrix said:

I despise polishing silver

Almost as bad as doing copper.  Once in a while, I get the bug and do a pot or pan - it looks great for a day or two, and then...

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We have threads for annoyances and what made us cheerful, but then there's those weird things that happen.....   My workplace is particularly fertile ground for the surreal. 2 current examples:

Yeah, me too.   As soon as I'm a real member, I'll upload a real avatar.   Or did you mean my sig?

You talkin' to me?

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1 hour ago, joethefoodie said:

Almost as bad as doing copper.  Once in a while, I get the bug and do a pot or pan - it looks great for a day or two, and then...

And this is why I've always been able to overcome my desire to buy copper!

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Someone I "know" only by her Gothamist commenter name turns out to be the woman a friend moved in with (platonically, I think) when his marriage ended. She posted a flyer for a live music show in Brooklyn that he's presenting and she's MC'ing, and I was like, hey! I'm going to that. With the ex-wife. This should be interesting.

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On 5/24/2021 at 8:02 AM, small h said:

Resolved amicably. Liberato (of The Borscht Belt Deli) says he wasn't involved with his restaurant's interior design, and they're gonna change it. I don't believe the first part, but whatever. Peace has been restored in loxland.

https://www.boweryboogie.com/2021/06/russ-daughters-settle-style-spat-with-nick-liberato-and-borscht-belt-deli/

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I grew up in a planned Levitt community in New Jersey.  (My best friend grew up in another Levitt community in a different part of NJ, but with the same model houses.)  There's a FB group for people who lived and still live in that community.  I joined, and there are so many great pictures and documents posted to the group, especially from the plannings and first 10 years of the development.  Among the many items are pictures of house and retail construction, the original 1963 brochure listing all of the home models and their prices/monthly payments, and a 10-page homeowner's brochure.  The latter detailed every feature of the homes and how to maintain them, plus a full section on "Preservation of Property Values" (lawn maintenance, no clotheslines, etc.).  It's been a real trip down memory lane, plus I'm glad to get confirmation of some of my memories, like a farmstand that apparently had been near my house for a while but only remained the first summer we were there.

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29 minutes ago, StephanieL said:

...a 10-page homeowner's brochure.  The latter detailed every feature of the homes and how to maintain them, plus a full section on "Preservation of Property Values" (lawn maintenance, no clotheslines, etc.).

I have/maintain the last extant clothesline in Jordan Park, maybe in San Francisco.    I will kill anyone who tries to dismantle it, although it is used maybe 20 minutes a year.   

Husband adds that my apex was when we lived in El Paso for a couple of years.   It was so hot and so arid that you would hang your clothes on the line, then return to the first ones hung and take them down, bone dry.

 

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12 hours ago, StephanieL said:

I grew up in a planned Levitt community in New Jersey.  (My best friend grew up in another Levitt community in a different part of NJ, but with the same model houses.)  There's a FB group for people who lived and still live in that community.  I joined, and there are so many great pictures and documents posted to the group, especially from the plannings and first 10 years of the development.  Among the many items are pictures of house and retail construction, the original 1963 brochure listing all of the home models and their prices/monthly payments, and a 10-page homeowner's brochure.  The latter detailed every feature of the homes and how to maintain them, plus a full section on "Preservation of Property Values" (lawn maintenance, no clotheslines, etc.).  It's been a real trip down memory lane, plus I'm glad to get confirmation of some of my memories, like a farmstand that apparently had been near my house for a while but only remained the first summer we were there.

Chief among Levitt methods of "preservation of property values" was the inclusion in the deeds of restrictive covenants to keep the communities segregated.

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17 minutes ago, Anthony Bonner said:

yeah - I honestly thought that's where the original post was headed. 

https://www.nytimes.com/1997/12/28/nyregion/at-50-levittown-contends-with-its-legacy-of-bias.html

My dad (career Army) was turned away from Long Island Levittown, but I guess I should be thankful because he would have been serving overseas while our neighbors lit crosses on the lawn or worse. We were barred from living at Stuyvesant Town, any Trump buildings in Queens and Brooklyn, most Queens and Manhattan cooperative buildings. Unable to purchase in Levittown and similar planned communities. All he wanted was to settle his family in a safe community before going back overseas. In the end, we settled into a middle income public housing project in Queens, until he retired from the Army and took a job with federal law enforcement. 

Fun fact: My mother's home, which I inherited last year, contained a restrictive covenant prohibiting her from owning it. 

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46 minutes ago, splinky said:

any Trump buildings in Queens and Brooklyn,

some things which are horrible we can almost be thankful for. Almost.

The coop in which we live actually lost a federal discrimination lawsuit when the jewish cabal which ruled grand street turned down the sale of an apartment to a Puerto Rican buyer.

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18 minutes ago, joethefoodie said:

some things which are horrible we can almost be thankful for. Almost.

The coop in which we live actually lost a federal discrimination lawsuit when the jewish cabal which ruled grand street turned down the sale of an apartment to a Puerto Rican buyer.

true. clearly in the end we don't want to have neighbors who don't want us as neighbors, but it sure limits choices about where to actually live.

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Yup, let’s bring back the “ good old days”!    It wasn’t so “great”.  
 

On our block we have 2 Chinese, 1  Indian, 1 Armenian, 2 Jewish, 1 Irish and around the corner. 2 Japanese. Not really integrated  but if you got the money. Honey,you got the house.   

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