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So many Exhibitions, So Little Time

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Just noticed there’s a fairly big Miró show opening at MoMA on 2/24. Makes it feel like spring is just around the corner.

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Just noticed there’s a fairly big Miró show opening at MoMA on 2/24. Makes it feel like spring is just around the corner.

 

Went to Monday night's after hours preview, but after stopping at Connolly's Pub across the (54th) street. What's not to like?

 

Me - I especially liked the multimedia pieces on view.

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The next show I am looking forward to is https://philbrook.org/exhibitions/larry-clark-tulsa/ 

 

Here is the museums blurb.  "World-renowned photographer/filmmaker Larry Clark was born and raised in Tulsa. From 1963 to 1971, he photographed the daily lives of his friends. He captured unforgettable images of sex, violence, and drug use alongside intimate moments of solitary contemplation. These images were collected in Clark’s legendary and controversial 1971 book, Tulsa.

These pictures launched both Clark’s career and a new style of photography marked by equal parts intimacy and objectivity. Filmmakers Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, and Gus Van Sant cited Clark’s visual influence on their films Taxi DriverRumble Fish, and Drugstore Cowboy, respectively.

The gritty, honest, and ultimately compassionate look at drug abuse in Tulsa feels timely and vital even now as the United States grapples with a wide-reaching opioid addiction and renewed debates about gun and domestic violence. These concerns are at the core of the Philbrook Downtown presentation of selections from Philbrook’s newest acquisition, a 50-print portfolio of photographs from Clark’s Tulsa series.

Larry Clark: Tulsa is presented with generous support from the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation."

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I saw the Tulsa series somewhere years ago, and have the book. It’s both depressing, and the launch of a lot of cool stuff including (some of) Clark’s movies.

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If you like this kind of thing, the Adolph Gottlieb show at Pace (25th St) is museum scale and quality, and a knockout. All post-pictograph stuff.

 

I thought the recent Jasper Johns works at Matthew Marks we’re kind of sad. No sign of a major artist left.

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Basquiat at the Brant Foundation. Wow. I saw one of his collaborations with Warhol at the Whitney pretty recently, so this felt like a continuation. The space is quite spectacular. And it still has that new museum smell.

 

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This one kind of looks like me.

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If you like this kind of thing, the Adolph Gottlieb show at Pace (25th St) is museum scale and quality, and a knockout. All post-pictograph stuff.

 

I thought the recent Jasper Johns works at Matthew Marks we’re kind of sad. No sign of a major artist left.

 

Well certainly an 88-year old artist is working differently than a 40-year old one, no?

 

Have you ever seen any late-career work of deKooning - amazing, but in a totally different way. ( I think he also suffered from Alzheimer's late in life).

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The late DeKooning is problematic for me.  It does seem to be a huge falling-off from his earlier work.

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I like late dekoening a lot, even if it is a step down from his earlier stuff. he’s probably my favorite painter.

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I guess artists such as Basquiat, Van Gogh, Vermeer, et al. were lucky dying so young. That way, their latter work couldn't be compared to their earlier stuff.

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It's not so much about age; after all, Picasso, Matisse, and many other painters enjoyed a productive old age, despite physical challenges. It's more a question of how volitional DeKooning's later work is.  I don't have the answer, but if you compared the later with the earlier -- without knowing anything about the circumstances of their composition -- would you find the work of similar stature?

 

easter-monday-1955-56_willem_de_kooning.

de-kooning-3.jpg

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I saw a big show at the national gallery that had everything organized by decade and it didn’t seem like a gigantic break.

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