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So many Exhibitions, So Little Time


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Well worth making a reservation to visit the Pace galleries on West 25th for the Sam Gilliam show. Schjeldahl's review sent me there, and the work really is spectacular. I recommend going to the smaller gallery first (nearer 10th Ave) to see his more traditional color field paintings. I think that increases the impact of the drip paintings in the larger gallery. At first glance you'll think Pollock, but he uses a range of techniques (collage elements, very thick paint) to create remarkable depth. The colors dance out at you like the best of Rothko. Unmissable.

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Suggest a thread to mention interesting exhibitions you mean to attend.   Philip Pearlstein's retrospective at Monclair Art Museum, till Feb 1, 2009.   will add more later

here too   definitely planning to go.  

The Wallace Gallery at Columbia U. has a small show of works by Edward Koren, one of the cartoonists at The New Yorker. Interesting to see his evolution - as a student at CU, Koren worked on the humo

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Two good reasons to reserve a time slot at the Morgan.* Upstairs, a show by Betye Saar, who I am ashamed to say was not on my radar: at age 94, she's still working and producing. She executes what she calls "assemblages" -- arrangements based on found objects (and collage) but thoroughly reworked. Some beautiful pieces, for the most part carrying heart-breaking messages (as in "Loss of Innocence," a vintage child's dress on which hateful names for black children are delicately picked out).

And then there's Hockney, "Drawing from Life." I have seen an awful lot of Hockney over the years, and don't go out of my way to see more. But this exhibit succeeds through its focus: four of five models (including Hockney himself), reiteratively depicted by the artist over decades. You see the models age before your eyes, and you witness the variety of styles Hockney adopted and discarded. Worthwhile. And if nothing else, "Image of Gregory" is a knockout work:

 

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*On a Saturday morning, I had the Saar exhibit completely to myself; there were a handful of people in the two Hockney galleries.

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On 11/23/2020 at 6:53 PM, StephanieL said:

We've got tickets to see the Frida Kahlo exhibition at the DeYoung at the end of December, unless SF museums have to fully close again.

Nope, not happening.  Nearly all of the Bay Area (except for San Mateo County) is proactively going back into lockdown starting on Sunday night.  This will continue at least through the beginning of January.  No more haircuts either and we're back to capacity restrictions in the supermarkets, though schools that were already open can stay open.

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11 hours ago, StephanieL said:

Nope, not happening.  Nearly all of the Bay Area (except for San Mateo County) is proactively going back into lockdown starting on Sunday night.  This will continue at least through the beginning of January.  No more haircuts either and we're back to capacity restrictions in the supermarkets, though schools that were already open can stay open.

And Nero is still fiddling.

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Everyone was masked at the Brooklyn Museum's Studio 54 show. And groups of people kept to themselves. But those groups didn't seem, collectively, to feel the need to keep away from other groups. We felt less than safe till we reached the final, cavernous gallery in the exhibit.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Went to The Met last week. This is the longest I've gone without stepping into that museum in 30 years. I kind of like the visitor restrictions - a lot less annoying visitors taking photos of everything. I wanted to see Making of the Met which closed over the weekend. It was an interesting look at the history of the museum but the most fascinating thing I learned that was during both WWI and WWII the US military worked with the museum's curators for armor for assistance in developing prototype helmets and other body armor. The classic M1 helmet was designed by Met specialists.

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34 minutes ago, joethefoodie said:

Even though I haven't been, I renewed our memberships to all local museums on the last day of the year. And the botanical gardens as well.

So it's not too crazy in the Met?

There was a physically distanced line for the Costume Institute show (they have timed tickets) but otherwise it wasn't nearly as crowded. I have never seen the Grand Hall as empty as it was on Thursday.

Just beware that they've closed the coat checks. (as they have at MoMA as well)

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