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So many Exhibitions, So Little Time


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The experience is very different from visiting the actual Frick and seeing everything in situ, but at the Breuer, you can get within inches of the artworks and examine them in good light. 

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Suggest a thread to mention interesting exhibitions you mean to attend.   Philip Pearlstein's retrospective at Monclair Art Museum, till Feb 1, 2009.   will add more later

here too   definitely planning to go.  

The Wallace Gallery at Columbia U. has a small show of works by Edward Koren, one of the cartoonists at The New Yorker. Interesting to see his evolution - as a student at CU, Koren worked on the humo

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On 4/8/2021 at 3:50 PM, Lippy said:

The experience is very different from visiting the actual Frick and seeing everything in situ, but at the Breuer, you can get within inches of the artworks and examine them in good light. 

This a must-see exhibition. One reason, as Lippy said, is that you can really see the art works. It reminds you just how dismally lit some of the rooms in the Frick were. Also, and this may be irrational, but seeing the works in a conventional gallery space underlines just how many world-class masterpieces there are in this collection. I think the Frick was like a comfortable pair of slippers - you were just used to seeing the Rembrandt self-portrait not well lit and the Tiepolo in the entrance corridor.

Another point: it's great that some of these works, like Fragonard's four "Progress of Love Paintings" were beautifully set off by the interior decor at the Frick: but boy, do they pop when they're hung on plain gallery walls, again in good light.

One surprise for me: recall how the two Turners were hung facing each other in that long gallery among many other works? Here they share a room with just one other work, Constable's "The White Horse." And the Constable cleans their clocks - something I never imagined I would say. A much more achieved painting.

Finally, did they lose the Whistlers? Did not see them anywhere.

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I missed the Whistlers, too, somehow.  On line I learned that they are in gallery 22.  This gives me justification to go again, not that any is needed, but admission for a non-member is pricey.

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We're de Young members, so once the museums opened up at 25% capacity we booked (free) tickets to the Frida Kahlo exhibit whose run got extended.  Unfortunately, between the time we booked and the time we went this past Saturday, SF expanded museums to 50% capacity, and frankly it seemed like there were no capacity limits at all.  If it hadn't been for the fact that everyone was wearing masks, you could have thought it was like the before times: no distancing, people crowding around the art, standing in the middle of a small gallery space to look at the tour on their phones, etc., etc.  N said she even felt people breathing down her neck.  The guards either could care less or don't have the authority to police people.  After 5 minutes, we were both so freaked out that we had to leave.  It's a shame, because there were some really great items there, including lots of Kahlo's homemade outfits.

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On 4/11/2021 at 7:10 PM, Lippy said:

I missed the Whistlers, too, somehow.  On line I learned that they are in gallery 22.  This gives me justification to go again, not that any is needed, but admission for a non-member is pricey.

Kind of annoying that my Met membership isn't valid for the Frick collection. Like, do I get a refund for the part of the membership which covered me visiting the Breuer?

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We went to the Whitney for Community Day today, and that Making Knowing craft exhibit is the shit! Dawoud Bey: An American Project was staggering as well. And I got to paint and decorate a small ceramic troll at one of the some hands-on workshops. It's nice to get back there. Also, (and this is going to maybe sound terrible) I kind of hope they keep the timed entry stuff even after the pandemic is actually gone-ish. It would be great to attend a Biennial that didn't feel like the 6 train at rush hour.

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