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11 hours ago, Sneakeater said:

But the question wasn't who's like Porter.  It was who's as good as Porter.

Holland, Dozier, Holland?

Lorenz Hart?

 

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H-D-H as the best lyricists in American music?  Not sure about that.

OTOH, whichever one of Lieber-Stoller wrote the lyrics . . . .

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Concerto Köln:  La Prise de la Bastille (orchestral works by Martin/Gossec/von Dittersdorf/Davaux)

Gesualdo:  Madrigals//Stravinsky:  Monumentum pro Gesualdo (Martin/Horne/Lauridson/Levitt/Robinson/Scharbach/Kraft//Biggs//Rosensteil//Stravinsky/Columbia Symphony Orchestra)

Randy Newman:  The Randy Newman Songbook Vol. 2

Bach:  English Suites Nos. 2, 4 & 5 (Perahia)

Al Bilali Soudan:  Al Bilali Soudan

Locate 5,1:  Personalia

Brahms:  String Quartet No. 2//Verdi:  String Quartet (Artemis Quartet)

Alice Coltrane:  Translinear Light

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Dvorak:  Symphony No. 1 (Kertész/London Symphony Orchestra)

Khruangbin:  Con Todo el Mundo

Stravinsky:  Le Rossignol (Grist/Driscoll/Gramm//Stravinsky/Chorus & Orchestra of the Opera Society of Washington D.C.)

Yves Tumor:  Heaven to a Tortured Wind

Patricia Pettibon:  L'Amour, la Mort, la Mer

Ornette Coleman:  At the Golden Circle, Volume Two

Martial Canterel:  Refuge Underneath

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Dvorak:  Symphonies Nos. 2 & 3 (Kertész/London Symphony Orchestra)

Hinds:  The Prettiest Curse (I liked them better when they were punk)

Amira Saqati:  Destination Halal

Stravinsky:  The Firebird (Stravinsky/Columbia Symphony Orchestra)

Thundercat:  It Is What It Is

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Serge Gainsbourg:  Mauvaises Nouvelles des Étoiles

Redd Kross:  Third Eye

Andrew R. Butler:  Rags Parkland Sings the Songs of the Future (Original Cast)

The Weeknd:  After Hours

Various:  The Savory Collection 1935-1940 (Disc IV)

Randy Newman:  The Randy Newman Songbook Vol. 3

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A good thing about this post-Modern world is that the phrase "selling out" has almost no content any more.

Hinds would say they expanded their sound to include pop.

I don't like it as much.

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Concerto Köln:  Sinfonias Españolas (by Moreno/Pons/Nono/Arriaga) (probably the best accounts of this repertoire I have ever heard)

Kapsberger:  Labarinto d'Amore (Dunford/Reinhold)

James Farm:  City Folk

Sonny Til & The Orioles:  Still Crying in the Chapel (in its way, as exquisite as the Baroque cantatas I love to listen to)

Stravinsky:  Violin Concerto/Symphony in Three Movements (Stern//Stravinsky/Columbia Symphony Orchestra) (this was one of the first classical albums I ever bought; even I, a vinyl loyalist, have to admit this new CD remastering -- well, it came out in 2015, so I guess it's only "new" if you're Old like me -- is a BIG improvement) (now, though, it's hard to hear these pieces and not think of Balanchine)

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The Strokes:  The New Normal (I should love them.  But I just don't)

Brunetti: Symphonies (Concerto Köln) (again, about the best accounts of this repertoire I have heard)

Alkemie:  Live 2019

Bob Dylan:  Rough and Rowdy Ways

Mary J. Blige:  Herstory, Vol. 1

Handel:  Complete Flute Sonatas (Lisa Beznosiuk/Richard Tunnicliffe/Paul Nicholson) (this isn't fabulously great music, but this has to be the best case for it I've heard made) (and it's STILL Handel, even if not from his top drawer)

Various:  Goodbye, Boys, Goodbye!:  Girl Group Pop Gems Obscure & Unreleased (1963-1967) (despite what you might hope, this is not an Olivia Records compilation)

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On 6/29/2020 at 12:57 AM, Sneakeater said:

A good thing about this post-Modern world is that the phrase "selling out" has almost no content any more.

Hinds would say they expanded their sound to include pop.

I don't like it as much.

In contrast, repeated listening to the most recent Sleater-Kinney made me realize that in going pop they were doing something quite audacious.

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Sibelius:  Scaramouche (Segerstam/Turku Philharmonic Orchestra) (who knew Sibelius could be so charming?)

Novos Baianos:  Acabou Chorare

Blacher:  Romeo & Juliet (Robinson/Simpson/Crawford/Vote//Silberschlag/Chesapeake Chamber Orchestra) (this unknown opera is really good)

Various (actually it's all Count Basie):  The Savory Collection 1935-1940 (Discs V & VI)

Schubert:  Forellenquintett//Mozart:  Piano Quartet No. 1 (Brendel/Zehetmair/Zimermann/Duven/Riegelbauer)

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On 6/29/2020 at 12:57 AM, Sneakeater said:

A good thing about this post-Modern world is that the phrase "selling out" has almost no content any more.

Hinds would say they expanded their sound to include pop.

I don't like it as much.

I would have classed them as powerpop.

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