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Bought a bunch the other day. It looks a bit like spring onions crossed with leeks crossed with naked garlic bulbs. Strong garlic flavor, not separatable cloves.

 

So far I've used 1 bulb, chopped and sauteed with mirepoix for flageolet beans. In other words, just like regular garlic, which seemed a bit of a waste. Still have the leaves from that one, and a few more bulbs plus leaves. I'm thinking maybe mixing with potato for ravioli filling, including using the leaves (chiffonade like leek greens and sauteed). Any other suggestions?

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I bought some yesterday at the Greenmarket, thinking it was a bunch of leeks or some such. OK, I'm a food moron. Big surprise.

 

Tonight, finally realizing it was garlic, I mixed the bulb and the softer of the leaves (the woody center is inedible) into some mushrooms that I sauteed with dinner. And if I say so myself, it was pretty good.

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PS for people who live near me in Brooklyn -- there's a new Expensive Fancy Mushroom vendor in the spur of booths in the GAP Greenmarket set on the road into the Park whose products, while Expensive and Fancy, are awesome.

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I make a green garlic soup - chop up 8 heads w/part of the green stalk, saute with potato. Add some stock and simmer. Puree. I might be forgetting an ingredient or two. Quite pungent, but we always enjoy it.

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Thanks!

 

I actually Googled "green garlic" and got a few suggestions, including something from Chez Pim that looked good(but required prawns that I don't think I can get easily :( . Now I think I might use it in a frittata with asparagus stalks -- I've been planning to do that anyway sometime this week, and this would make it more interesting. (Dare I admit that I'm not all that fond of asparagus -- pee aside. ;) )

 

BTW, Sneak: I make a practice of buying things -- vegetables mostly, and often Asian or South Asian -- that I have no idea what they are. Then I play with them. It's fun. :) And now maybe I'll get some mushrooms at USGM tomorrow, to add to the frittata!

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Oh, I'm way beyond that, in terms of ignorance of basic things that any competent person would know.

 

There was this famous instance many years ago where my wife sent me out to buy some parsley. Believe me, my ignorance of leafy greens is total.

 

So I got to the Korean grocer and told him I'd been sent to buy parsley. Our ignorances complimented each other: I didn't know anything about greens, and he didn't know anything about English. So he didn't know what "parsley" was, either. Between us, we settled on something that turned out to be cilantro as being the likeliest thing. When I got home, my wife was not pleased (albeit amused).

 

This had the good result (for me) that my wife never sent me out to buy greens again.

 

(OBLIGATORY SELF-PITYING ADDENDUM [NOTE: If you're tired of reading about how my wife is dead and all, STOP READING NOW]: Of course, now, I'm kinda at a loss, leafy greens wise.)

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Bought a bunch the other day. It looks a bit like spring onions crossed with leeks crossed with naked garlic bulbs.

 

I've never seen it before - I'll have to check it out.

 

Where I stay in England, there grows, near a ford in the river, what my friend refers to as wild garlic. I had thought they were ramps. But being a coward, I won't actually try tasting something wild and unidentifiable that grows in another land.

 

What you described above sounds exactly like it.

 

PS: Sneak, you cooked!

 

 

 

 

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You could always look stuff up on the eG cooking academy, or whatever it's called. ;)

 

Barring that, I know of a bunch of books that would truly be helpful if you want to teach yourself. Of course, then we'd no longer get your excellent reports on restaurants (and on the pulchritude of various barmaids). :( So on second thought, don't learn to cook. :D

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I use it in a frittata or risotto, to make salsa verde, or on pasta as a riff on aglio/oglio. A Romanian friend once served me what she said was a typical Romanian dish, lamb braised with green garlic--lots of it because it cooks down quite a bit.

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Green garlic is fantastic pickled. Make a simple pickle brine with rice vinegar, a bit of sugar, and a pinch or two of salt. Cut off the bulb part of green garlic, reserve the top for other use. Wash well, scrub a layer or two of paper off the bulbs and soak in the brine for a few days. (Throw out the paper and soak the bulbs, btw.) The brine is so high in acidity that you won't have to worry much about botulism. If you're just making a small amount it'll keep fine in the fridge. If not, you can jar them and process in water bath for longer keeping.

 

You can also add a few dried hot chilli peppers or a handful of sizhuan peppercorns for variation.

 

The pickled garlic is great sliced and add to stir-fries, salads, or eat as a condiment with grilled meat.

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