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40% off coupon and a gift certificate, what should I get? It's going to depend on what they have in stock, of course, but some books on my wish list or just look interesting are (not in any particula

I agree, except that once in a while I feel like doing it. What I find chef's or restaurant cookbooks useful for is inspiration, new flavor combinations, new ingredients, that kind of thing. It woul

That's great news! Out of nowhere the other day, Eden Lipson crossed my mind. Now I know why.

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No, but I'll see if I can get if from my library (on interbranch loan after you're done with it? ^_^ ).

I tried to renew, but was not allowed to, because there are other holds on it, but you can try. It may take a few weeks before it's available.

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Jeremy Fox's On Vegetables. http://www.phaidon.com/store/food-cook/on-vegetables-9780714873909/

 

Beautiful and inspiring. Should be read by anyone contemplating vegetarian or vegan cooking. Yes, dairy plays a big part in many recipes, but could be sidestepped with a little additional creativity.

 

Like this mushroom stew. Swap out the cream in the potato puree with veg broth. Still stunning and full of flavor.

 

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This copy is from the library, but I think I need to buy one since the post-its I stuck in it make it look like a porcupine.

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Inspired by someone I go out with, I've been buying a lot of the Time-Life "Good Cook" cookbooks. (I think Richard Olney was an editor.)

 

Olney was "Chief Series Consultant." Maybe that means he gave shape and format to the series.

 

I love those books--a combination of information on ingredients and techniques, then recipes for all over the world (well, Europe mostly). I should use them more.

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Inspired by someone I go out with, I've been buying a lot of the Time-Life "Good Cook" cookbooks. (I think Richard Olney was an editor.)

 

Olney was "Chief Series Consultant." Maybe that means he gave shape and format to the series.

 

I love those books--a combination of information on ingredients and techniques, then recipes for all over the world (well, Europe mostly). I should use them more.

 

 

At a minimum, they are a snapshot in time.

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Inspired by someone I go out with, I've been buying a lot of the Time-Life "Good Cook" cookbooks. (I think Richard Olney was an editor.)

 

Olney was "Chief Series Consultant." Maybe that means he gave shape and format to the series.

 

I love those books--a combination of information on ingredients and techniques, then recipes for all over the world (well, Europe mostly). I should use them more.

 

 

At a minimum, they are a snapshot in time.

 

I have most of them too...love these books. Some of the Foods of The World are really a snapshot in time....especially the photos.

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Inspired by someone I go out with, I've been buying a lot of the Time-Life "Good Cook" cookbooks. (I think Richard Olney was an editor.)

 

Olney was "Chief Series Consultant." Maybe that means he gave shape and format to the series.

 

I love those books--a combination of information on ingredients and techniques, then recipes for all over the world (well, Europe mostly). I should use them more.

 

 

At a minimum, they are a snapshot in time.

 

I have most of them too...love these books. Some of the Foods of The World are really a snapshot in time....especially the photos.

 

Germany especially (Foods of the World, that is).

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This series came out at an important time in my cooking life, providing broad instruction about basic product as well as foreign cuisines. But shortly after and perhaps because of this series and the following broadened interest in travel and food, there was an explosion of books on ethnic cooking as well as menu specifics such as souffles, patés, breads, slow cooking (soups and stews) and on and on. IMHO, these later books were written by people with deeper and more passionate feelings about their subject matter. In comparison, T & L was, again IMHO, instructive but sterile.

 

I gradually exchanged my T & L volumes for writings on specific areas, both geographical and cooking. But T & L remains a fascinating and well written time capsule.

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